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A few days after the presentation,
we will send an evaluation and links to an archive and resources.
We appreciate your fe...
Child and Family Learning Network
Connect with us!
To receive notifications of future webinars and other learning opportun...
Additional Webinar Resources:
Wellness in the Workplace
https://learn.extension.org/events/1617
Wellness in the Workplace
Kathleen Morgan
Family & Community Health Sciences Department Chair,
Rutgers Cooperative Extensi...
Adults/Employees are not healthy!
The Burden of Heart Disease &
Stroke
Know your state and local data to
report to potential partners and
employers. Compare...
According to 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor
Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey results, adults in
NJ reported the following r...
Risk Factor New Jersey Nationwide (States
and D.C.)
Eat fruits &
vegetables less than
5 times/day
72.5 75.6
Overweight or ...
Workplace Wellness…Why Should
We Care?
Healthier Individuals = lower co-pays & out-of-pocket
costs, improved quality of li...
Employers are wise to invest in
worksite health promotion:
Improve employers’ health, productivity & contribute to an
impr...
Developing a Culture of Wellness in the
Workplace
A Culture of Wellness:
Does not happen overnight, because it
Is a cultural shift in an organization, and is
More than a fe...
What are the barriers?
Busy employees
No budget
Confusion- where do we start?
Lack of participation
What does a culture of wellness look like on
the worksite?
Opportunities for employees to learn
about
healthy lifestyle be...
Nutrition information
Provide information about healthy food choices
Avoiding diet trends
Healthy choices identified in ve...
Supportive opportunities and encouragement to
become more physically active…
community events
walking programs
incentiv...
Tobacco Free Living
Provide informational sessions about smoking
Provide smoking cessation programs
Emotional Health
Provide information about:
 stress management
 anxiety
 depression
Strategies for reducing the above
Preventative care
Healthcare system encourages
engagement in preventative care:
annual physicals
age-appropriate screenings
Gaining the Support of Management
The most important factor in worksite wellness
success may be the support of senior-level
management.
Be prepared to answer these questions:
•How will this initiative improve our workplace?
•How much will it cost to run this...
Tailor program strategies to meet the
goals/mission of the organization.
Consider this:
Does senior management believe in health
promotion programs at the worksite?
Does senior management partici...
A few quick tips
Share health claims data
Talk about the Return on Investment (ROI) on
worksite wellness programs (increased
productivity, reduced absenteeism, decr...
Remember this!
A healthy workforce is more productive, less
likely to be absent from the job, has improved
morale, and has...
Create a Wellness Committee
The Wellness Committee plays a large role in the
worksite’s health promotion activities, although the
committee can be sma...
Step One
Design the committee with a
cross-section of employee
representation from:
Management
Supervision
Human Resources...
Step Two
Convene a meeting to:
Discuss the results of the Employer Needs Assessment
and the Employee Behavior & Interest S...
Develop a realistic Work Plan
for the committee that will
show an impact on the work
environment.
Choose a starting point!
Prioritize the needs and
work of the wellness
committee
Community Based Efforts-
Main Street Projects, Business
Districts, Industrial Areas: What can
they do?
• Better walking pa...
Assessments
Employer Needs Assessment
Health Risk Assessments (HRA’s) help employers and
their wellness committees identify:
Strength...
Employer Needs Assessment
Employee Baseline Behavior & Interest Survey
Information about employee healthy lifestyle
behaviors
Information about heal...
Low, Medium, and High Cost Resources
How much time & money are you willing to
invest to develop
a Culture of Wellness in your organization?
Low-Cost Resources
Create a wellness committee
Promote and encourage employee
participation in:
Nutrition education
Phys...
Low-Cost Resources
Provide health promotion via:
Newsletters
Websites
Email
Other internal communications
Medium-Cost Resources
Arrange wellness committee meetings on a
regular basis
Offer wellness topic presentations
Host a hea...
Medium-Cost Resources
Conduct wellness screenings (BMI, blood
pressure, diabetes)
Provide health risk assessments
On-site ...
High-Cost Resources
Develop a budget for health promotion
Provide healthcare coverage for employees &
their families for p...
High-Cost Resources
Provide wellness programing to employee
family members
Provide on-site fitness facilities for
employees
Every program starts with a first step!
Kathleen Morgan
Family & Community Health Sciences Department Chair, Rutgers
Cooperative Extension
morgan@njaes.rutgers.ed...
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Wellness in the workplace webinar may 2014

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Wellness in the Workplace webinar-May 28, 2014

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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Wellness in the workplace webinar may 2014

  1. 1. A few days after the presentation, we will send an evaluation and links to an archive and resources. We appreciate your feedback. To receive these emails, please enter your email address in the chat box before we start the recording. All chats will be recorded and archived. Welcome to the Child and Family Learning Network Webinar Wellness in the Workplace
  2. 2. Child and Family Learning Network Connect with us! To receive notifications of future webinars and other learning opportunities from the Child and Family Learning Network, email Katie_Stamper@ncsu.edu. www.eXtension.org/families_and_child_well_being blogs.eXtension.org/childfamily http://www.pinterest.com/childandfam https://www.youtube.com/user/FamChildWellBeing facebook.com/childandfamilylearningnetwork twitter.com/Child_FamLN
  3. 3. Additional Webinar Resources: Wellness in the Workplace https://learn.extension.org/events/1617
  4. 4. Wellness in the Workplace Kathleen Morgan Family & Community Health Sciences Department Chair, Rutgers Cooperative Extension morgan@njaes.rutgers.edu Joanne Kinsey Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Atlantic/Ocean Counties jkinsey@njaes.rutgers.edu
  5. 5. Adults/Employees are not healthy!
  6. 6. The Burden of Heart Disease & Stroke Know your state and local data to report to potential partners and employers. Compare it to national data to tell the story.
  7. 7. According to 2007 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey results, adults in NJ reported the following risk factors for heart disease and stroke: – 28.2% had high blood pressure – 38.6% of those screened reported having high blood cholesterol – 9.2% had diabetes – 17.1% were current smokers – 62.3% were overweight or obese (BMI greater than or equal to 25.0) – 51.9% reported no exercise in the prior 30 days – 72.5% ate fruit and vegetables less than 5 times a day
  8. 8. Risk Factor New Jersey Nationwide (States and D.C.) Eat fruits & vegetables less than 5 times/day 72.5 75.6 Overweight or obese 62.3 62.9 No moderate or vigorous physical activity 51.9 50.5 High total blood cholesterol 38.6 37.6 High blood cholesterol 28.2 27.8 Cigarette smoking 17.1 19.8 Diabetes 9.2 8.0
  9. 9. Workplace Wellness…Why Should We Care? Healthier Individuals = lower co-pays & out-of-pocket costs, improved quality of life Healthier Workplace = lower premiums, higher morale, improved productivity, fewer employee sick days & absence Healthier Communities = improved quality of life, increased volunteerism
  10. 10. Employers are wise to invest in worksite health promotion: Improve employers’ health, productivity & contribute to an improved quality of life. Reduce missed workdays due to chronic illness related to heart disease & stroke – reducing the cost to employers for downtime & temporary help. Decrease absenteeism, employer turnover & health-care costs. May reduce the management of health-care & the cost of benefits & insurance. Create a culture of wellness in the work environment.
  11. 11. Developing a Culture of Wellness in the Workplace
  12. 12. A Culture of Wellness: Does not happen overnight, because it Is a cultural shift in an organization, and is More than a few haphazard activities, and Is sustainable!
  13. 13. What are the barriers? Busy employees No budget Confusion- where do we start? Lack of participation
  14. 14. What does a culture of wellness look like on the worksite? Opportunities for employees to learn about healthy lifestyle behavior: Nutrition Increased physical activity Tobacco free living
  15. 15. Nutrition information Provide information about healthy food choices Avoiding diet trends Healthy choices identified in vending machines Healthy options in the cafeteria
  16. 16. Supportive opportunities and encouragement to become more physically active… community events walking programs incentives for gym memberships walking stations/paths on-site
  17. 17. Tobacco Free Living Provide informational sessions about smoking Provide smoking cessation programs
  18. 18. Emotional Health Provide information about:  stress management  anxiety  depression Strategies for reducing the above
  19. 19. Preventative care Healthcare system encourages engagement in preventative care: annual physicals age-appropriate screenings
  20. 20. Gaining the Support of Management
  21. 21. The most important factor in worksite wellness success may be the support of senior-level management.
  22. 22. Be prepared to answer these questions: •How will this initiative improve our workplace? •How much will it cost to run this program or bring about this change? •How can we persuade workers to participate? •How will we know if this was a meaningful use of time and resources?
  23. 23. Tailor program strategies to meet the goals/mission of the organization.
  24. 24. Consider this: Does senior management believe in health promotion programs at the worksite? Does senior management participate in wellness activities or practice healthy lifestyle habits?
  25. 25. A few quick tips Share health claims data
  26. 26. Talk about the Return on Investment (ROI) on worksite wellness programs (increased productivity, reduced absenteeism, decreased health care costs, improved morale). Look for cost-free or low-cost programs to get started.
  27. 27. Remember this! A healthy workforce is more productive, less likely to be absent from the job, has improved morale, and has the need for LESS dollars spent on health care claims.
  28. 28. Create a Wellness Committee
  29. 29. The Wellness Committee plays a large role in the worksite’s health promotion activities, although the committee can be small in numbers. Be sure to convene interested or experienced employees as role models.
  30. 30. Step One Design the committee with a cross-section of employee representation from: Management Supervision Human Resources Other Wellness Champions
  31. 31. Step Two Convene a meeting to: Discuss the results of the Employer Needs Assessment and the Employee Behavior & Interest Survey Discuss other worksite data collected about wellness issues (example - health claims data)
  32. 32. Develop a realistic Work Plan for the committee that will show an impact on the work environment. Choose a starting point!
  33. 33. Prioritize the needs and work of the wellness committee
  34. 34. Community Based Efforts- Main Street Projects, Business Districts, Industrial Areas: What can they do? • Better walking paths • Bike riding to work: purchasing bike racks • Working with famer’s markets to provide coupons • Walking club • Community wellness initiatives
  35. 35. Assessments
  36. 36. Employer Needs Assessment Health Risk Assessments (HRA’s) help employers and their wellness committees identify: Strengths in their programming Gaps and areas of need Begin the conversation about wellness at the worksite
  37. 37. Employer Needs Assessment
  38. 38. Employee Baseline Behavior & Interest Survey Information about employee healthy lifestyle behaviors Information about health topics of interest and how employees want the information delivered Data reported back to the employer
  39. 39. Low, Medium, and High Cost Resources
  40. 40. How much time & money are you willing to invest to develop a Culture of Wellness in your organization?
  41. 41. Low-Cost Resources Create a wellness committee Promote and encourage employee participation in: Nutrition education Physical activity/fitness
  42. 42. Low-Cost Resources Provide health promotion via: Newsletters Websites Email Other internal communications
  43. 43. Medium-Cost Resources Arrange wellness committee meetings on a regular basis Offer wellness topic presentations Host a health fair
  44. 44. Medium-Cost Resources Conduct wellness screenings (BMI, blood pressure, diabetes) Provide health risk assessments On-site weight management programs
  45. 45. High-Cost Resources Develop a budget for health promotion Provide healthcare coverage for employees & their families for prevention & treatment of chronic disease
  46. 46. High-Cost Resources Provide wellness programing to employee family members Provide on-site fitness facilities for employees
  47. 47. Every program starts with a first step!
  48. 48. Kathleen Morgan Family & Community Health Sciences Department Chair, Rutgers Cooperative Extension morgan@njaes.rutgers.edu Joanne Kinsey Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Atlantic/Ocean Counties jkinsey@njaes.rutgers.edu

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