Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
International Day Against
Homophobia, Transphobia
and Biphobia – 17 May
CREATING INCLUSIVE WORKPLACES FOR PEOPLE FROM GEND...
Introduction
 Inclusion Committee works towards making the office a place that is inclusive of
people from all different ...
Why is this important for the workplace?
 Research shows that people who feel like they can be “out” at work and honest a...
History of the day
 Established at the International Day Against Homophobia in 2004, held on 17 May when
the World Health...
LGBTIAQQ+???
 There is a constant struggle for all gender and sexuality diverse people to be
recognised by the movement
...
The solution: “Queer”
 Rather than using a long acronym that is confusing and can leave people out, the term “queer” is a...
Terminology: Sexuality
 Homosexual/gay: Same sex attraction, some may limit this to men only
 Lesbian: Same sex attracti...
Terminology: Gender Identity
 Transgender: Identifying as a different gender to what you were assigned at birth.
I.e. at ...
A special category: Intersex
 Intersex: Being born with reproductive anatomy or genetics that not the typical
definition ...
Terminology: Making the dominant norm
visible
 Our society only seems to demand that queer people “come out” and “identif...
Distinct categories of gender and sexuality
status
Sexuality – I am
attracted to…
Gender Identity – I feel
I am a….
Do sex...
Born this way?
 Contrary to the popular Lady Gaga song, not everyone thinks they were “born this
way”
 Sexuality and gen...
Identity vs physical sex characteristics
 Gender identity is not based on a person’s sex characteristics, or whether they...
Being inclusive in the workplace
 It goes without saying saying outright derogatory things to queer co-workers is not oka...
For more information
 Workplace resources: http://orinam.net/resources-for/workplace/
 General resources: https://lgbt.f...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

You can listen to the audio of this talk here: soundcloud.com/user-613779614/idahobit

This talk is an introduction to queer issues.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

  1. 1. International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia – 17 May CREATING INCLUSIVE WORKPLACES FOR PEOPLE FROM GENDER AND SEXUALITY DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS
  2. 2. Introduction  Inclusion Committee works towards making the office a place that is inclusive of people from all different backgrounds  As a bisexual person, I wanted to sponsor a day dedicated to gender and sexuality diverse people  The aim of this presentation is to educate staff about gender and sexuality issues so we can all be more aware and inclusive of people from different backgrounds
  3. 3. Why is this important for the workplace?  Research shows that people who feel like they can be “out” at work and honest about their gender/sexuality are more productive, better team members and more satisfied with their working life, therefore will stay with that employer for longer  See Out Now’s report “LGBT Diversity: Show Me The Business Case”  Making a workplace inclusive for gender and sexuality diverse people starts with people having an awareness of these different identities and knowing how to avoid behaviour that might make them feel uncomfortable
  4. 4. History of the day  Established at the International Day Against Homophobia in 2004, held on 17 May when the World Health Organisation decided to remove homosexuality from the International Classification of Diseases in 1990  “Draw the attention of policymakers, opinion leaders, social movements, the public and the media to the violence and discrimination experienced by LGBTI people internationally”- DayAgainstHomophobia.org  2009: Transphobia was included to recognise issues faced by transgender people  2015: Biphobia was added to the title to include bisexual people
  5. 5. LGBTIAQQ+???  There is a constant struggle for all gender and sexuality diverse people to be recognised by the movement  The original term was “gay”  “gay and lesbian”  LGB (lesbian, gay, bisexual)  LGBT to include transgender, etc  Now the acronym can be as long as LGBTIAQQ+ to encompass:  Intersex  Asexual  Queer  Questioning  “Plus” – other identities such as pansexual, demi-sexual, etc  The further down the acronym you are, the less recognition you get
  6. 6. The solution: “Queer”  Rather than using a long acronym that is confusing and can leave people out, the term “queer” is a term that everyone can use to refer to people that gender or sexuality diverse  It is used as an adjective i.e. a queer person, like you would say “Indigenous person”  It is not used as a noun i.e. you wouldn’t say “The queers are concerned about their rights”  The word has been reclaimed from its derogatory past, and is now seen as acceptable for non-queer people to use it in this context  This is not to say that all queer people are alike, or that they experience the same discrimination  However, these people are united by the fact that they sit outside the heterosexual or cisgender normative - in the same way that people of colour are from very different backgrounds, but are united by their common experience of racism
  7. 7. Terminology: Sexuality  Homosexual/gay: Same sex attraction, some may limit this to men only  Lesbian: Same sex attraction experienced by women  Bisexual/pansexual: Historically defined as being attracted to two genders (bi=two), however often now seen as being attracted to “your gender and other genders” to include people that identify as neither male or nor female.  Asexual: Person that doesn’t experience sexual attraction. Someone between “sexual” and “asexual”, who is only attracted to people they are emotionally bonded to, is a demisexual (demi meaning half)
  8. 8. Terminology: Gender Identity  Transgender: Identifying as a different gender to what you were assigned at birth. I.e. at birth the doctor identified you as female based on your sex characteristics. However, you identify as male – as a transman (Terms transman/transwoman emphasise the gender identity of the person, not the gender assigned at birth)  Genderqueer/non-binary: Someone who identifies as neither strictly male or female, that is they are outside the gender binary – they may identify as a third gender, or as gender neutral or agender. People who move between genders are gender fluid.
  9. 9. A special category: Intersex  Intersex: Being born with reproductive anatomy or genetics that not the typical definition of male or female. I.e. being born with some cells with XX chromosomes, some with XY chromosomes.  At about 1 in 1500-2000 births the gender is “indeterminate”  Intersex Society of North America (ISNA.org)  Hermaphrodite is now considered a derogatory term for intersex people.  Intersex people may identify as any sexual orientation or gender identity i.e.  Heterosexual and male  Asexual and female  Pansexual and genderqueer
  10. 10. Terminology: Making the dominant norm visible  Our society only seems to demand that queer people “come out” and “identify” – this is problematic, because unless you “come out”, you are assumed to be a heterosexual, cisgender person  So on the flip side of queer, here are the identities are other people can use to “come out”, terms that you may not have heard before:  Heterosexual: opposite of homosexual  Monosexual: opposite of bisexual, only attracted to one gender  Cisgender: opposite of transgender, that is you identify as the gender you were assigned at birth  Sexual/allosexual: opposite of asexual, feeling sexual attraction  Dyadic: opposite of intersex, having sex characteristics that fit a defined gender
  11. 11. Distinct categories of gender and sexuality status Sexuality – I am attracted to… Gender Identity – I feel I am a…. Do sex characteristics match male or female? Do you agree with your assigned gender? One other gender – either male or female - heterosexual Man Yes - Dyadic Yes - Cisgender Same gender – homosexual Woman No - Intersex No - Transgender All genders – bisexual/pansexual Gender-queer/non- binary/third gender No one - asexual It changes – gender fluid Defined by you Defined by a doctor at birth Defined by you, compared to how you were defined at birth
  12. 12. Born this way?  Contrary to the popular Lady Gaga song, not everyone thinks they were “born this way”  Sexuality and gender can be fluid and change for people, at any stage in their lives  However, this doesn’t mean you should minimise someone’s experience as simply a “phase”  Many transgender people have very strong feelings of their gender identity, some as young as 18 months old have identified as transgender:  “I a boy” – 18 month old transboy
  13. 13. Identity vs physical sex characteristics  Gender identity is not based on a person’s sex characteristics, or whether they have had any kind of gender reassignment hormonal treatment or surgery – it is about how they identify  People often focus on the physical aspect of a person’s sexuality i.e. asking transgender people if they’ve had “the surgery”  This is highly offensive – it’s basically asking someone to tell you what’s in their pants!  Accept how someone identifies – their identity is valid regardless of whether you understand and it and no one should have to justify their identity for someone else  Use the gender pronouns that they identify with – they may feel comfortable telling you, otherwise the commonly used pronouns are:  Transwoman/ciswoman – she/her  Transman/cisman – he/him  Genderqueer/non-binary – they/them  If you’re unsure, use their name or they/them
  14. 14. Being inclusive in the workplace  It goes without saying saying outright derogatory things to queer co-workers is not okay  However, without intending to be discriminatory, you may do something excludes someone who is gender/sexuality diverse by using certain language or making assumptions:  Calling someone who looks feminine a “she” assumes gender – she could be genderqueer or a transman  Asking a male co-worker “Do you have a girlfriend?”, assumes he is attracted to women exclusively  Questioning why a transwoman is using the female toilets  Asking an asexual person why they have never had a partner (although some asexual people will have romantic relationships without sexual attraction)  Assuming a woman with a male partner is straight when she could be bi/pansexual  Using language that limits gender identity to a binary – i.e. “attraction to the opposite sex” rather than “attraction to other sexes”
  15. 15. For more information  Workplace resources: http://orinam.net/resources-for/workplace/  General resources: https://lgbt.foundation/

×