Districtcna

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Districtcna

  1. 1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report Gerrish-Higgins School District Roscommon, Michigan, United States Prepared for the Michigan Department of Education Submitted: Not submitted yet
  2. 2. Gerrish-Higgins School District Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report Contents Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Purpose of the Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Structure of the Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Summary of Uses for the CNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 District Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Strand I - Teaching For Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Standard 1 - Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Standard 2 - Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Standard 3 - Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Strand II - Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Standard 1 - Instructional Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Standard 2 - Shared Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Standard 3 - Operational and Resource Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Strand III - Personnel and Professional Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Standard 1 - Personnel Qualifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Standard 2 - Professional Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Strand IV - School and Community Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Standard 1 - Parent/Family Involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Standard 2 - Community Involvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Strand V - Data Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Standard 1 - Data Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Standard 2 - Information Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Goals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 CNA - Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Report - Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 2 of 34
  3. 3. Gerrish-Higgins School District Introduction Purpose of the Report The Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) was developed to be used as a tool to assist a school staff in determining the strengths and challenges of their school. The CNA assesses the system processes and protocols of practice that are in place to support student academic achievement. Completion of these reports will also fulfill many of the federal requirements for a comprehensive needs assessment prior to decisions regarding how federal funds will be spent in a building or district. Structure of the Report The School Improvement Framework establishes a vision for school improvement. The Process Cycle for School Improvement has four major components that cycle in continuous praxis. They are: Gather Data Where are we now (status) and where do we want to be (goals)? Study/Analyze What did the data/information we collected tell us? Plan How do we organize our work so that it aligns to our goals and resources? Do Staff implements the strategies and action steps outlined in the plan Gather Data II Where are we now (status) and did we reach our goals? While the SI Framework provides the vision for school improvement, the CNA is a tool that supports two of the four areas of the School Improvement Process: Gather Data and Study. The following pages provide probing questions to create dialogue about student and school data. They are designed to facilitate a deeper reflection into a school's data/information and protocols of practice in order to identify areas of need. Data/information from the CNA can be used to write a school improvement plan that includes specific student achievement goals, objectives, and strategies designed by the stakeholders. A CNA should be conducted once every three to five years, coinciding with the school improvement planning cycle, and revisited annually. Sources of data/information that serve the process of needs identification can include: School Improvement Framework Rubric self assessment (which includes the EdYES! Performance indicators), the current school improvement plan, information contained in the School Report Card, school's annual education report, and student test data from multiple sources. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 3 of 34
  4. 4. Gerrish-Higgins School District The CNA consists of three sections Student Data Analysis: Assesses current student achievement data and information about the school. The resulting Student Data Analysis Report can be used for school improvement planning purposes. The report includes: 1) Identification of Student learning goals, 2) Identification of possible contributing causes for gaps in achievement, and 3) Objectives to achieve student learning goals. This process is done as the first step of the CNA. The information links and template should be obtained from the NORMES website. The links are available on your homepage. Instructional Processes and Practices Analysis: Assesses the system processes and protocols of practice that are in place to support student academic achievement. The assessment focuses on all 90 of the Key Characteristics contained in the School Improvement Framework Rubrics. Standard and Strand analysis reports have been included to organize the identified strengths and challenges in system processes and protocols of practice. Completion of this section will also provide information required to for the annual Education YES! Performance Indicators report. Conclusions and Goals: Provides a format to align identified student achievement challenges with system challenges. Summary of Uses for the CNA Guide the school's identification of additional resources (grants) to support its goals and objectives. Annually evaluate progress on the 40 Education YES! Performance Indicators. Annually review and/or evaluate all 90 indicators in the School Improvement Framework. Serve as the basis for all other needs assessments that may be required of the school. Form the basis of the school's professional learning plan as required by PA25. Identify areas of need to be included in the school's technology plan. Satisfy NCA requirement for a School Profile Report. Comply with federal grant requirements of aligning resources with identified needs through a comprehensive needs analysis. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 4 of 34
  5. 5. Gerrish-Higgins School District District Information District: Gerrish-Higgins School District ISD/RESA: C.O.O.R. ISD Public/Non-Public: Non-Public Grades: PK,K,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 District Code Number: 72010 City: Roscommon State/Province: Michigan Country: United States Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 5 of 34
  6. 6. Gerrish-Higgins School District Strand I - Teaching For Learning The school holds high expectations for all students, identifies essential curricular content, makes certain it is sequenced appropriately and is taught effectively in the available instructional times. Assessments used are aligned to curricular content and are used to guide instructional decisions and monitor student learning. Michigan Department of Education began publishing both the school's self-rating and the evidence reported for each indicator in 2005. The school's self-rating for each characteristic, and the evidence provided, is available to the public on the School Report Card. Standard 1 - Curriculum Schools/Districts have a cohesive plan for instruction and learning that serves as the basis for teachers' and students' active involvement in the construction and application of knowledge. Benchmark A: Aligned, Reviewed & Monitored Indicators: I.1.A.1 Aligned, Coherent and Inclusive Curriculum: The written curriculum incorporates the district's expectations for good instruction and essential content and affirms a common vision and understanding of the learning standards under which the district operates. Based on state standards, it is structured around a set of interrelated programs for students and staff, guided by a common framework, and pursued over a sustained period of time. The curriculum reflects a commitment to equity and diversity and its flexibility is designed to address the wide range of needs and abilities of all students. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: The district has an aligned K-8 curriculum in the four core academic areas, as well as other areas. Evidence of progress to date includes: a formal written document and detailed grade level curriculum maps.The Scott Foresman Reading and Everyday Math programs K-8 directly align with the GLCE's and MCF. All teachers are working toward using and aligning the written curriculum with fidelity.In support of the written curriculum, the Supervising Learning/Teacher Evaluation Process provides documentation of administrative support and teacher feedback, of the alignment of standards-based, cross curricular instruction in all four core content areas. The results support that standards-based education which is aligned and driven by the MCF and the GLCE's. Curriculum teams meet regularly and continue to review and revise the process. Subject alignment for music, physical education and technology are also in place and aligned to the MI Frameworks and GLCEs where available. As a Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 6 of 34
  7. 7. Gerrish-Higgins School District participant of MiBLSi project, DIBELS benchmarks are also included in curriculum mapping. Extensive work has been done with the Human Sexuality Advisory Committee and the teaching of HIV/AIDS mandated by the State of Michigan for the Health Curriculum. The District Technology Plan has been updated. Roscommon High School is in the process of implementing the new Michigan Merit Curriculum, realigning classes and classroom instruction to meet the demands of this curriculum. Freshman and sophomore level classes have been re-evaluated by staff to include best practices and to help students meet the states content expectations (junior and senior classes are in the process of realignment). RHS staff members have worked in Professional Learning Communities (PLC), within each discipline, to work on identifying power standards and aligning these standards with the curriculum. Benchmark B: Communicated Indicators: I.1.B.1 Communicated and Articulated Curriculum: The district places a high value on effective communication and articulation of the curriculum. In order to communicate this curriculum to all stakeholders, a variety of two- way communication techniques are employed. The district facilitates a system-wide curricular dialog and clearly defines expectations about essential content throughout instructional levels. This includes a cross-school review of the content and the identification and elimination of gaps and overlaps. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: The written district curriculum is easily cross-referenced through the use of grade level brochures which identify major content and themes taught at each grade level. These documents are sent home to parents annually, given to all new families when registering, and available to teachers. Performance- based report cards offer additional detail of curricular content, and examples of the cards are available for cross-grade reference. Grade level teams meet regularly in order to collaborate about curriculum, instruction, and to evaluate data. Data information cards are completed for every student, and passed on to the next year's teacher, thus providing a myriad of information at a glance. Many job-embedded opportunities are in place for staff to work together collaboratively, both as grade level and cross grade level teams. District time is provided once a month for K-12 discussion of curriculum by content area. MiBLSi provides an avenue for professional development K-8 this year and K-12 next year, to help communicate and articulate core curriculum in reading. In support to the written curriculum, the Supervising Learning/Teacher Evaluation Process provides documentation of administrative support and teacher feedback, of the alignment of standards-based, cross curricular instruction in all four core content areas. The results support that standards-based education which is aligned and driven by the MCF and the GLCEs. Weekly departmental PLC meetings provide time for staff to continue working of developing and, in some cases, modifying curriculum in order to meet state content expectations as well as meet our overriding school goal of improving writing across the curriculum. Staff PD time has been allocated to also include the teaching of reading strategies to students. Both reading and writing are areas of concern based upon MME results. Using data triangulation of teacher assessment, NWEA, and at the High School level MME/ACT results, teachers are able to generate appropriate interventions Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 7 of 34
  8. 8. Gerrish-Higgins School District for students. These interventions are based upon student abilities and we are continually working to improve how teachers differentiate instruction within their classrooms. These practices and changes are communicated to stakeholders through dialogue and the school listserv. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? The work that the staff has been doing in differentiated instruction, reading strategies (for expository text), and writing prompts across each discipline will have the greatest impact on our students and their achievement levels. We are in the infancy of our new MMC ideas, so student growth will only improve as we improve our instruction. Standard 2 - Instruction Intentional processes and practices are used by schools and teachers to facilitate high levels of student learning. Benchmark A: Planning Indicators: I.2.A.1 Systematic Planning for Quality Instruction: The district has a comprehensive vision for the delivery of quality, culturally relevant instruction. District leaders work directly with school leaders to ensure a reflective and evidence-based approach to teaching practice. There is a common expectation throughout all instructional levels that research-based instructional strategies are collaboratively developed, observable in classroom practice and measured by their impact on student achievement. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We are data driven in our district! The data that we compile drives our instruction. DIBELS, NWEA, SWIS, MIACCESS, MLPP, QRI, Title I Comprehensive Needs Assessment (Pre-8), and report cards align with the GLCEs. Gap Analysis is used to define curricular areas of need. Special Education uses AIMS writing probes. We use MEAP results to help focus our writing, and evaluate which students go to extended day. Comprehensive curriculum maps have been compiled and are utilized for each grade level. Backward design units have been put together which incorporate higher level thinking skills. Written documentation of curriculum planning takes place during districtwide PD release time and grade level meetings.Curricular mapping at each grade level follows a prescribed scope and sequence aligned to the state standards. Weekly collaborative sessions among grade level teams allows for review of student data and an opportunity for ongoing discussion of student needs. Common assessments, particularly in writing, are scored as a group. Results of summative assessments are consistently recorded, and analysis of the data is used to plan future instruction. Cross district planning Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 8 of 34
  9. 9. Gerrish-Higgins School District is scheduled annually, and provides additional collaborative time in order to review pacing schedules and curriculum equity from classroom to classroom. Input from teachers is key to the selection and purchase of curricular support materials. Pilot programs are often used to field test researched based programs, and professional development offerings are sufficient to sustain the initiatives provided. (Everyday Math, Four Block Literacy, 6+1 Traits of Writing and Lucy Calkins are examples.) Benchmark B: Delivery Indicators: I.2.B.1 Coherent and Effective Support for the Delivery of Instruction: The district provides a collaboratively developed and implemented standards-based, system-wide framework of high quality instruction that includes common instructional strategies in a real-world context. The emphasis is on challenging, rigorous and equitable practices and support is provided to promote the success of all students. To achieve this shared vision of instruction, the district collaborates with staff to provide context- and research-based professional development. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Grade level teams through out the district work in collaborative teams. The district provides one monthly 2 hour late arrival day for whole building Professional Learning Communities (PLC) with two of those arly relaease days being used for districtwide curricular area meetings. This provides regular discussion opportunity for teachers to have meaningful conversations about instructional strategies and classroom practices as they apply to curricular units. Team planning results in shared responsibility and greater equity of instruction from classroom to classroom. Professional development opportunities and professional learning community approaches are used to promote continuous changes in researched based instructional practices. Regularly scheduled observations are assured by contract, and administrative walk throughs are routine. Through the Title I Comprehensive Needs Assessment Pre-8, we provide staff and schedule support for students who are targeted. We have a color coding system which identifies benchmark (green), strategic(yellow), and intensive (red) students that reflects changes within skill areas. Title I services change based on the color coding system. Curriculum mapping provides scope and sequence, time lines and connections between units. Modifications are made for students when necessary, and extensions are offered to those who require it. After school intervention programs and summer school opportunities offer additional support to struggling students, while in-class aid support is offered by highly qualified para-professionals. Teacher/student artifacts demonstrate differentiated lessons and assignments through writing folders, lesson plans, and various activities. We continually adapt our curriculum to meet the ever changing Michigan Grade Level Content Expectations in all subject areas! Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? PLC meetings where the focus is on continual development of the curriculum has the strongest impact on Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 9 of 34
  10. 10. Gerrish-Higgins School District student achievement and learning. Standard 3 - Assessment Schools/districts systematically gather and use multiple sources of evidence to monitor student achievement. Benchmark A: Aligned to Curriculum & Instruction Indicators: I.3.A.1 Use of Multiple Measures to Support School-wide Decision-making: The district is committed to the use of multiple measures to inform decisions at both the school and district level. Multiple sources of data are used to guide instruction, monitor student achievement, assure equity, provide accountability and determine resource allocation. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: At both of the districts' elementary schools staff consistently uses formative, periodic benchmark, and culminating assessments to monitor student achievement and inform instruction. Assessment is an essential part of planning. We use MEAP, MI-ACCESS, & NWEA as our schools' Standardized assessments. Daily Practice Aligned to Standardized Assessments: GLCE's, Everyday Math Unit Tests, Writing Prompts/Rubrics, Accelerated Reader, Science & Social Studies Rubrics, Spellings tests, DIBELS progress monitoring, and formative assessments in Language Arts. Benchmark Assessments: NWEA (Given 3 times a year), MEAP, Everyday Math Assessments, MLPP, DIBELS, QRI, Fitness Grams, Music Assessments, and Report Cards. Culminating Assessments: Science Fair, Science investigation journals, research project presentations, processed writing, projects, portfolio's, and performances. Our assessment data consistently drives instruction. At the secondary level, various assessments are used as outlined in the lesson, including teacher-designed tests and quizzes, rubrics, authentic assessments, observation,etc. * Formal assessments (MEAP and NWEA) align with standards & benchmarks, GLCE's. The NWEA is given three times a year to our students. This data is analyzed and compared throughout the school year. Student results are used to measure our curriculum goals. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Using NWEA and MME/ACT data has been the driving force behind our curriculum choices and will continue to be used to show student growth and achievement. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 10 of 34
  11. 11. Gerrish-Higgins School District Strand II - Leadership School leaders create a school environment where everyone contributes to a cumulative, purposeful and positive effect on student learning. Michigan Department of Education began publishing both the school's self-rating and the evidence reported for each indicator in 2005. The school's self-rating for each characteristic, and the evidence provided, is available to the public on the School Report Card. Standard 1 - Instructional Leadership School leaders create and sustain a context for learning that puts students' learning first. Benchmark A: Educational Program Indicators: II.1.A.1 High Standards and Clear Expectations: There is a system-wide climate that supports student learning with equity as a core value. Everyone in the district is united in purpose to assure that all students learn to high standards in order to close achievement gaps. District leaders and school administrators set clear expectations and decentralize responsibility for decisions through the provision of internal accountability measures. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: The building principals through out the district assume the role as leading by example through full participation in the professional development opportunities sponsored by the local and intermediate school districts. (i.e. MIBLSI (Academic and Behavioral), Professional Learning Communities). There is full participation by building leadership in suggested and mandated teacher trainings at the district level such as MLPP, LETRS, DIBELS, Data Usage and Professional Learning communities. One district school leader has been trained as a state literacy trainer and works outside the district as a regional consultant. Another principal serves as district representative for the COOR Intermediate School District CCCPD advisory board which is responsible for professional development recommendations at the ISD level. As part of participation in the MiBLSi grant (Pre-8 this year and Pre-12 next year), building leadership teams guide schoolwide efforts for data analysis and school wide program development and implimentation as it applies to continuing school improvement. The superintendent has also served in a leadership role to support curricumlum discussion in World Languages at both the intermediate school district and state level. Utilizing our PLC groups for common planning has been the biggest key for us in not only targeting students, but also in targeting Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 11 of 34
  12. 12. Gerrish-Higgins School District focus areas within our curriculum. Within these PLC groups, content expectations and course requirements are discussed as are common formative and summative assessment pieces. Also, we are able to pursue smaller PD opportunities through introducing various reading strategies, for example, and asking for teachers to try them in their classrooms and report back to the PLC about the impact the strategy had on students. We have had staff-wide PD on expository text reading strategies, John Collins/Mark Dressel writing processes, utilizing NWEA results, as well as looking at the work of Mike Schmoker, Ruby Payne, and Paul Slocumb. Benchmark B: Instructional Support Indicators: II.1.B.1 Culture of Collaboration: District leaders are continually seeking to build a culture of mutual respect, collaboration, trust and shared responsibility for system as well as school improvement. A common value throughout the district is that adults, as well as students, are continuous learners. As a result, Professional Learning Communities exist at all levels of the organization. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: All members of staff through out the district are active participants in the school improvement process. Collaborative decision making is part of the district culture. Major curricular purchases are made with input from the teaching staff from each of the four buildings. Materials sufficient to teach curriculum are purchased, and programs with upgraded editions are provided as needed. Site based decision making is at the center of the building culture thorugh the district whenever such a choice is possible. Major decisions are generally made as a result of full staff discussion using a consensus model. The community and parents have had a major voice in regards to the SCORE meetings that the superintendent has implemented over the course of the last three years. We continueto implement several positive changes as a result of this group. The Superintendent has also implemented a parent and a teacher committee. Both groups meet monthly to discuss needed changes and budget issues. And again, several positive changes have coem form both groups. We have continued to give teachers time to visit and observe each other's classrooms. Teachers us the norms and ground rules they have established for discussions, written reflections and after substantive discussions and specific protocols for discussion. Through everything above, a very healthy professional learning community has emerged which is driven by data results. The above collaborative practices occur across grade levels and content areas. Grade levels cross each other, as well as content areas through the Understanding By Design (Backwards Design) process. Staff members design shared teaching units from a "Big Idea" process. Assessment instruments are devised first and Multiple Standards are incorporated across all Content Areas. Change has been continual within our high school as we work to adapt to the MMC requirements. Key points for us include PLC work, formal administrative observations, informal administration walk-throughs. We also are able to emply two-hour late-arrival or early-dismissal days for staff and PLC professional development opportunities. For us, the collaborative nature inherent in the PLC allows us to constantly re-evaluate our curriculum maps and course requirements. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 12 of 34
  13. 13. Gerrish-Higgins School District II.1.B.2 Instructional Program Coherence: In order to assure coherence across the entire system, district leaders have established a vision of powerful teaching and learning in collaboration with stakeholders. The district provides direction, assistance and resources to align, support, and enhance all parts of the system in seeking to successfully achieve this vision. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Our local MEA Teachers' Organization has demonstrated great support for following the vision of each one of our buildings through contract language they wrote. Teacher contracts contain language listing expectations for teaching standards appropriate with high expectations. The district and building missions provide clear statements of goals of learning success for every student. Annual reports and grade level brochures distributed to parents, clearly communicate desired student outcomes. Performance based report cards are correlated with state grade level content expectations. Surveys conducted as part of school improvement efforts have shown high levels of satisfaction by both parents and students in matters connected to applying school rules fairly and consistently. The Mission Statement also appears on the district website and in the student handbooks of each building which are reviewed annually. The most recent revisions of these policy handbooks were completed within the past year and included parent and community representation on the working committee. Change has been continual within our high school as we work to adapt to the MMC requirements. Key points for us include PLC work, formal administrative observations, informal administration walk-throughs. We also are able to emply two-hour late-arrival or early-dismissal days for staff and PLC professional development opportunities. For us, the collaborative nature inherent in the PLC allows us to constantly re-evaluate our curriculum maps and course requirements. Change has been continual within our high school as we work to adapt to the MMC requirements. Key points for us include PLC work, formal administrative observations, informal administration walk-throughs. We also are able to emply two- hour late-arrival or early-dismissal days for staff and PLC professional development opportunities. All staff members in our district are active participants in school improvement work. We recently completed a successful Quality Assurance Review (QAR) visit at the high school this past February. Common planning and common formative and summative assessments are also employed. We have also recently revisited and reworked our schools vision and mission statements, making sure that all stakeholders were involved in the process and that both statements truly embody our school improvement goals. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? The PLCs at all buildings are making a very postive impact on students achievemnent. It allows for professionakl dialogue and planning. Standard 2 - Shared Leadership Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 13 of 34
  14. 14. Gerrish-Higgins School District Structures and processes exist to support shared leadership in which all staff has collective responsibility for student learning. Benchmark A: School Culture & Climate Indicators: II.2.A.1 Coordinated Policies and Procedures: District policies and procedures are collaboratively developed, well understood and consistently and fairly implemented. The district's priority is on clear communication of these policies and procedures to assure the effective operation of the entire system, with an emphasis on equitable practices and meeting the needs of the underserved. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Our local MEA Teachers' Organization has demonstrated great support for following the vision of each one of our buildings through contract language they wrote. Teacher contracts contain language listing expectations for teaching standards appropriate with high expectations. The district and building missions provide clear statements of goals of learning success for every student. Annual reports and grade level brochures distributed to parents, clearly communicate desired student outcomes. Performance based report cards are correlated with state grade level content expectations. Surveys conducted as part of school improvement efforts have shown high levels of satisfaction by both parents and students in matters connected to applying school rules fairly and consistently. The Mission Statement also appears on the district website and in the student handbooks of each building which are reviewed annually. The most recent revisions of these policy handbooks were completed within the past year and included parent and community representation on the working committee. All members of staff through out the district are active participants in the school improvement process. Collaborative decision making is part of the district culture. Major curricular purchases are made with input from the teaching staff from each of the four buildings. Materials sufficient to teach curriculum are purchased, and programs with upgraded editions are provided as needed. Site based decision making is at the center of the building culture thorugh the district whenever such a choice is possible. Major decisions are generally made as a result of full staff discussion using a consensus model. The community and parents have had a major voice in regards to the SCORE meetings that the superintendent has implemented over the course of the last three years. We continueto implement several positive changes as a result of this group. The Superintendent has also implemented a parent and a teacher committee. Both groups meet monthly to discuss needed changes and budget issues. And again, several positive changes have coem form both groups. We have continued to give teachers time to visit and observe each other's classrooms. Teachers us the norms and ground rules they have established for discussions, written reflections and after substantive discussions and specific protocols for discussion. Through everything above, a very healthy professional learning community has emerged which is driven by data results. The above collaborative practices occur across grade levels and content areas. Grade levels cross each other, as well as content areas through the Understanding By Design (Backwards Design) process. Staff members design shared teaching units from a "Big Idea" process. Assessment instruments are devised first and Multiple Standards are incorporated across all Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 14 of 34
  15. 15. Gerrish-Higgins School District Content Areas. Benchmark B: Continuous Improvement Indicators: II.2.B.1 Culture of Collective Responsibility: The district holds all adults accountable for student learning and the attainment of high standards. Productive relationships are developed with all stakeholders and leadership is distributed across these stakeholder groups. Therefore, the district expects individuals to be accountable for their contributions to the collective result. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: All members of staff through out the district are active participants in the school improvement process. Collaborative decision making is part of the district culture. Major curricular purchases are made with input from the teaching staff from each of the four buildings. Materials sufficient to teach curriculum are purchased, and programs with upgraded editions are provided as needed. Site based decision making is at the center of the building culture thorugh the district whenever such a choice is possible. Major decisions are generally made as a result of full staff discussion using a consensus model. The community and parents have had a major voice in regards to the SCORE meetings that the superintendent has implemented over the course of the last three years. We continueto implement several positive changes as a result of this group. The Superintendent has also implemented a parent and a teacher committee. Both groups meet monthly to discuss needed changes and budget issues. And again, several positive changes have coem form both groups. We have continued to give teachers time to visit and observe each other's classrooms. Teachers us the norms and ground rules they have established for discussions, written reflections and after substantive discussions and specific protocols for discussion. Through everything above, a very healthy professional learning community has emerged which is driven by data results. The above collaborative practices occur across grade levels and content areas. Grade levels cross each other, as well as content areas through the Understanding By Design (Backwards Design) process. Staff members design shared teaching units from a "Big Idea" process. Assessment instruments are devised first and Multiple Standards are incorporated across all Content Areas. The building principals through out the district assume the role as leading by example through full participation in the professional development opportunities sponsored by the local and intermediate school districts. (i.e. MIBLSI (Academic and Behavioral), Professional Learning Communities). There is full participation by building leadership in suggested and mandated teacher trainings at the district level such as MLPP, LETRS, DIBELS, Data Usage and Professional Learning communities. One district school leader has been trained as a state literacy trainer and works outside the district as a regional consultant. Another prinicipal serves as district representative for the COOR Intermediate School District CCCPD advisory board which is responsible for professional development recommendations at the ISD level. As part of participation in the MiBLSi grant (Pre-8 this year and Pre-12 next year), building leadership teams guide schoolwide efforts for data analysis and school wide program development and implimentation as it applies to continuing school improvement. The superintendent has also served in a leadership role to support curricumlum Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 15 of 34
  16. 16. Gerrish-Higgins School District discussion in World Languages at both the intermediate school district and state level. Our local MEA Teachers' Organization has demonstrated great support for following the vision of each one of our buildings through contract language they wrote. Teacher contracts contain language listing expectations for teaching standards appropriate with high expectations. The district and building missions provide clear statements of goals of learning success for every student. Annual reports and grade level brochures distributed to parents, clearly communicate desired student outcomes. Performance based report cards are correlated with state grade level content expectations. Surveys conducted as part of school improvement efforts have shown high levels of satisfaction by both parents and students in matters connected to applying school rules fairly and consistently. The Mission Statement also appears on the district website and in the student handbooks of each building which are reviewed annually. The most recent revisions of these policy handbooks were completed within the past year and included parent and community representation on the working committee. All members of staff through out the district are active participants in the school improvement process. Collaborative decision making is part of the district culture. Major curricular purchases are made with input from the teaching staff from each of the four buildings. Materials sufficient to teach curriculum are purchased, and programs with upgraded editions are provided as needed. Site based decision making is at the center of the building culture thorugh the district whenever such a choice is possible. Major decisions are generally made as a result of full staff discussion using a consensus model. The community and parents have had a major voice in regards to the SCORE meetings that the superintendent has implemented over the course of the last three years. We continueto implement several positive changes as a result of this group. The Superintendent has also implemented a parent and a teacher committee. Both groups meet monthly to discuss needed changes and budget issues. And again, several positive changes have coem form both groups. We have continued to give teachers time to visit and observe each other's classrooms. Teachers us the norms and ground rules they have established for discussions, written reflections and after substantive discussions and specific protocols for discussion. Through everything above, a very healthy professional learning community has emerged which is driven by data results. The above collaborative practices occur across grade levels and content areas. Grade levels cross each other, as well as content areas through the Understanding By Design (Backwards Design) process. Staff members design shared teaching units from a "Big Idea" process. Assessment instruments are devised first and Multiple Standards are incorporated across all Content Areas. II.2.B.2 Continuous Improvement: The district is a learning organization committed to long-term improvement. As a result, it establishes a system-wide strategic plan, fueled by data, with clear goals and accountability for results. All schools in the district are, in turn, learning organizations committed to long-term data-driven reform and all staff is held accountable for student achievement results. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Through out the district we use disaggregated data from a variety of sources (MEAP,NWEA, MLPP, DIBELS, Everyday Math, NCA instruments, grade-level and department created assessment data) to monitor student progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. Data-driven instruction has become so completely embedded into the instructional process that it has become second nature for Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 16 of 34
  17. 17. Gerrish-Higgins School District staff members. They make instructional decisions for students based on several different sources of data on a daily basis. Through the use of district data systems available, student data can be compared over time. State MEAP results and other standardized tests are used to identify learning trends over time, as well as to point out the need for changes in instruction. Student progress is tracked throughout the school year in order to support the building goal of a full year of growth for every child. Grade Level Content Expectations are used as a guide to assure that every child possesses the skills necessary to be successful at the next grade level. School improvement efforts and annual Title I School-Wide needs assessments are reviewed to measure growth and adjust focus when necessary. Support programs offer differentiated modifications and extensions for learners of all abilities. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? While all buildings are making continuos improvement the collaborative teams are still forming at the High School Level. Standard 3 - Operational and Resource Management School leaders organize and manage the school to support teaching for learning. Benchmark A: Resource Allocation Indicators: II.3.A.1 Accountability and Strategic Resource Allocation: The district's long range strategic plan allocates resources in an equitable manner to assure adequate support for its educational programs and to meet the diverse needs of its schools. Decisions are made in a transparent manner to assure accountability and equity in the allocation of resources. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Professional learning opportunities offer a variety of choices but are always tied to the Title I Needs assessment. All Professional development most be research-based and tied to student need. While some are mandatory, many others are optional. When the district requires participation, the offerings occur during the school day, or stipends are provided. Follow up activities are available to those who wish to learn more. Opportunities to participate in a variety of current topics are offered through partnerships with several Northern Michigan Intermediate School Districts. Additional opportunities are provided through the MiBLSi grant initiative (Pre-8 this year but Pre-12 next year). Staff is offered the opportunity to identify areas of professional development that they wish to explore as a district. Learning community opportunities are often offered locally for college credit. When teachers Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 17 of 34
  18. 18. Gerrish-Higgins School District participate in professional development instruction that takes them away from the classroom, the district expectation is that teachers must identify (in advance of the conference) how the information will be shared with a other teachers in the district. Administration supports teachers who wish to spend time in another classroom by providing substitute coverage in their classroom. State conferences that relate to school improvement are considered on a case by case basis again depending upon how they realte to the identified student need through the Title I Comprehensive Needs Assessment. New programs are implemented with sufficient in-classroom support and time within the school week is provided for collaborative discussion. Federal, state and local services and programs are effectively coordinated through the district consolidated application process tosupport our school-wide plan. In fact, Gerrish-Higgins is involved in a number of grants that the Business Manager, Shay Anderson; Superintendent and Director of 31a, Dr.Millie Park Mellgren; and Title I Director, Kathy Rees, have written with stakeholders through the consolidated application process. These groups have worked very hard to coordinate the following grants. -Title I, Part A/D -Title II, Part A - Title II, Part D -Title V -31a State At-Risk -ECE Kathy Rees is responsible for the Title I and Early Childhood grants. Dr. Park Mellgren, Superintendent, coordinates services for students formally identified to receive at-risk services. Mrs. Anderson coordinates Title II, Parts A & D and Title V. Mrs. Anderson, Dr. Park Mellgren , and Mrs. Rees have coordinated their efforts to efficiently supply materials, professional development activities, teacher stipends, release time and other support to the entire school district. The district professional development request form has been very helpful to coordinate those types of opportunities. On the forms, staff members are first and foremost requested to identify the connection of the professional development activity to NCA/School Improvement Goals. They are also required to obtain the approval of the project director if funding from one of the above grants is required. Mrs. Anderson, Dr. Park Mellgren, and Mrs. Rees adjust the source of the funding, with the purpose of coordinating all of the grants. For example, staff members who request to attend professional development activities need to complete a plan of how they intend to share and use the information themselves, upon their return. Their goal is to make meaningful choices for professional development, which reflects a comprehensive, coordinated approach for educational reform. At the intermediate school district level, Mrs. Mcnitt, Roscommon Elementary Principal is a member of the COOR Intermediate Coordinating Committee for Professional Development(CCCPD). The CCCPD have coordinated grant efforts and have offered extensive training sessions that are ongoing throughout the year. School calendars provide opportunities for building teams to work on school improvement and curricular considerations throughout the school year. Classroom instructional time is aligned with district goals and care is taken to preserve sufficient blocks of uninterrupted learning time. Schedules are planned around optimum student learning times whenever possible. Pull out programs and supplemental curricular instruction are offered during times that are least invasive to the classroom learning environment. Weekly common planning time is offered in a collaborative setting at each grade level, providing an additional two hours of group planning beyond contract requirements. Additionally, the district has seven late start days that provide fourteen more hours of time dedicated to group collaboration between grade levels. Protocols have been established for these meetings, agendas are in place, and minutes are recorded with the principal. The work completed with the behavior aspect of the MiBLSi grant (pre-4 this year and Pre-12 next year) promotes the investment of time and systems that result in less time spent on discipline, creating more time for student learning. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Collaborative Decision making is still developing at the secondary levels where it appears to be more in place at the elementary level. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 18 of 34
  19. 19. Gerrish-Higgins School District Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 19 of 34
  20. 20. Gerrish-Higgins School District Strand III - Personnel and Professional Learning The school has highly qualified personnel who continually acquire and use skills, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs necessary to create a culture with high levels of learning for all. Michigan Department of Education began publishing both the school's self-rating and the evidence reported for each indicator in 2005. The school's self-rating for each characteristic, and the evidence provided, is available to the public on the School Report Card. Standard 1 - Personnel Qualifications School/district staff qualifications, knowledge and skills support student learning. Benchmark A: Requirements Indicators: III.1.A.1 Highly Qualified Personnel: The district recruits, hires and retains a highly diverse and qualified staff. The primary attributes considered in the hiring process include: extensive knowledge of content area(s); demonstrated use of effective research-based and developmentally appropriate instructional practices and experience teaching a diverse population. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: All staff members through out the district are highly qualified as identified by No Child Left Behind. Ongoing professional development is available to teachers that focus on both content knowledge and best teaching practices. Every teacher has had intensive support (including peer coaching) to teach Everyday Mathematics and the Lucy Calkins writing framework. In addition, grant initiatives (MiBLSi - Pre-8 this year and Pre-12 next year) focus on strategies to improve student behavior and reading skills. Staff members routinely demonstrate a high level of expertise and incorporate higher order thinking in daily instruction. Building staff members have assumed a leadership role with a state organizations and committees, while another serves as a professional math consultant. The one of the building principals in the district serves as district representative to the COOR ISD team that is responsible for planning professional development. Many staff members assume leadership roles within the district and some have participated in state range finding and similar activities. Involvement with the state MiBLSi (Pre-8 ths year and Pre-12 next year) grant has resulted in a team centered approach to ongoing teacher development through training, guidance, feedback, resources/tools. A coordinated focus on action plans have resulted from current data throughout the year. The leadership Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 20 of 34
  21. 21. Gerrish-Higgins School District team uses collaborative time to disseminate this information to the building staff on a monthly basis and site based decision making is an essential part of the process. Professional development has included: RTI, NWEA, MiBLSi, Non-bullying intervention, Junior Class Learning, MEAP, Backwards Design, LETERS, Project Read, DIBELS, MLPP, QRI, and EPLI training, Non-violent crisis intervention, four blocks, Road to the Code, PALS, KPALS, using data, independent professional study and implementation of best practices, and staff led professional development (Project Read, Bullying Training, Positive Behavior Support meetings). New teachers are paired with Master Teachers to honor their required three year mentoring requirement and are given research-based professional development opportunities. By maintaining the PLC meetings, administration provides ample opportunity for all staff to be involved in the school improvement process. Collegial conversations, through the PLC format and through the use of mentoring, maintain a high level of professionalism and articulation of ideas. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? More development needs to take place in Recruitment of Highly Qualified. Standard 2 - Professional Learning Professional learning is conducted with colleagues across the school/district on improving staff practices and student achievement. Benchmark A: Collaboration Indicators: III.2.A.1 Coordinated Professional Development Based Upon Common Principles: The system provides job- embedded, on-going, interrelated learning opportunities for all staff to improve their effectiveness. The intent of professional development is to help build capacity and implement new skills system-wide emphasizing their application in the classroom. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: Cross district teams meet regularly to discuss/refine curriculum delivery and mapping as a result of late start release time offered monthly, and professional development time dedicated to this effort. In addition, collaborative planning is scheduled weekly through out all of the buildings in the district and participation is required at all grade levels and includes Special Education. This time is in addition to the planning time assured by union contract. Monthly staff meetings are dedicated to school improvement issues and most qualify as hours toward professional development. Peer coaching is used Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 21 of 34
  22. 22. Gerrish-Higgins School District to support our school improvement efforts in writing, and improved reading practices. Action research opportunities are available to all staff members and have been incorporated into mandatory ISD sponsored professional development at the beginning of the school year. (This year two days were dedicated to the work of Ruby Payne.) A building framework for professional learning communities is based on recent professional development centered on this work. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Collaborative Decision making is still developing at the secondary levels where it appears to be more in place at the elementary level. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 22 of 34
  23. 23. Gerrish-Higgins School District Strand IV - School and Community Relations The school staff maintains purposeful, active, positive relationships with families of its students and with the community in which it operates to support student learning. Michigan Department of Education began publishing both the school's self-rating and the evidence reported for each indicator in 2005. The school's self-rating for each characteristic, and the evidence provided, is available to the public on the School Report Card. Standard 1 - Parent/Family Involvement Schools actively and continuously involve parents and families in student learning and other school activities. Benchmark A: Communication Indicators: IV.1.A.1 Purposeful Communication and Collaborative Relationships: The district uses system-wide strategies to listen to and communicate with parents/families. They are provided meaningful roles in the decision-making process and the district promotes a culture of participation, responsibility and ownership. The collaborative relationships that are developed reflect the needs and strengths of the district, its schools and parents/families. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We are a school of limited diversity. The largest group would be economic status. Forty-eight percent is the population statistic used to qualify us as a Title I School-Wide site. All other categories of diversity combine to total less than 10%. While we do not have to consider families who speak another language, we do have to be concerned about families without telephones or computers. Because our school encompasses a large geographical area, it is often difficult for parents to travel (high fuel costs) the distance necessary for face to face conversations. To best communicate with all of our families, we send home many hard copy documents. Care is taken to assure that they are reader friendly. School/Parent/Family communication is conducted through Scoop Articles, Weekly Communicator Articles, Classroom Newsletters, Family Involvement Nights, Classroom phones, Parent Survey, Parent Workshops, District/School Website, Student-Led Conferences, Parent/Student Surveys, Title I Parent Compacts, Home Visits, Classroom Volunteers, Child Studies/IEPs and Daily Planners are utilized at the secondary level. We also offer parents the opportunity to attend the Kirtland Children's Theater Productions. Information is also available through our district, building and classroom websites. Parent Conferences are often scheduled in the evening so that parents do not have to leave Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 23 of 34
  24. 24. Gerrish-Higgins School District their jobs. Public transportation travel tokens are provided for parents who have no way to come to school for meetings. Technology contact opportunities are offered through our building and district websites, and through a ListServ, school information is communicated via the Internet. We offer open lines of communication with stakeholders via school e-mail, use of student planners and progress reports, and time available for parent-teacher conferences (three times per school year once a trimester). As a district, we also offer an after-school, extended day program to struggling students.rv which parents can sign up for on a voluntary basis. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Communication Improvement is a continuos process which alway needs further development. Standard 2 - Community Involvement The community at large is supportive of and involved in student learning and other school activities. Benchmark A: Communication Indicators: IV.2.A.1 Purposeful Communication and Collaborative Relationships: The district has developed on-going, system-wide strategies to listen to and communicate with its stakeholders. It has created and mobilized collaborative networks of these stakeholders to support the schools. They are given meaningful roles in the decision-making process thereby promoting a culture of participation, responsibility and ownership. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We are a school of limited diversity. The largest group would be economic status. Forty-eight percent is the population statistic used to qualify us as a Title I School-Wide site. All other categories of diversity combine to total less than 10%. While we do not have to consider families who speak another language, we do have to be concerned about families without telephones or computers. Because our school encompasses a large geographical area, it is often difficult for parents to travel (high fuel costs) the distance necessary for face to face conversations. To best communicate with all of our families, we send home many hard copy documents. Care is taken to assure that they are reader friendly. School/Parent/Family communication is conducted through Scoop Articles, Weekly Communicator Articles, Classroom Newsletters, Family Involvement Nights, Classroom phones, Parent Surveys, Parent Workshops, District/School Website, Student-Led Conferences, Parent/Student Surveys, Title I Parent Compacts, Home Visits, Classroom Volunteers, Child Studies/IEPs and Daily Planners are utilized at the secondary level. We also offer parents the opportunity to attend the Kirtland Children's Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 24 of 34
  25. 25. Gerrish-Higgins School District Theater Productions. Information is also available through our district, building and classroom websites. Parent Conferences are often scheduled in the evening so that parents do not have to leave their jobs. Public transportation travel tokens are provided for parents who have no way to come to school for meetings. Technology contact opportunities are offered through our building and district websites, and through a ListServ which parents can sign up for on a voluntary basis. The Superintendent meets with a group of parents monthly to discuss concerns and the implement change. Parents are also part of the development of the consolidated grant applications. Parents and community members have also participated in teh SCORE meetings. This group has defined district needs and many possitive changes have occured because of this group. Various forms of Parent Surveys are also utilized Pre-12 in order to obtain parent input of various topics and needs. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Communication Improvement is a continuos process which alway needs further development. Stakeholder in put is not consistently applied across all grade levels in our district. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 25 of 34
  26. 26. Gerrish-Higgins School District Strand V - Data Management Schools/districts have a system for managing data and information in order to inform decisions to improve student achievement. Michigan Department of Education began publishing both the school's self-rating and the evidence reported for each indicator in 2005. The school's self-rating for each characteristic, and the evidence provided, is available to the public on the School Report Card. Standard 1 - Data Management The school has policies, procedures and systems for the generation, collection, storage and retrieval of its data. Benchmark A: Data Generation Indicators: V.1.A.1 Comprehensive, Accessible and Meaningful Data System: Through the use of multiple types and sources of disaggregated data, the system informs efforts to close achievement gaps. This data is readily accessible to stakeholders directly involved in data-based decision-making. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We disaggregate our data obtained from NWEA, Work Keys, and the MME/ACT at the high school. MEAP and Data obtained through NWEA and Test Whiz is compared over time to establish learning trends. Item analysis of MEAP question statistics, together with review of released testing items, are used to focus teaching practices appropriate to student needs. at the elmetnary level DIBELS fluency data is used to identify Title I eligibility, for both in school and extended day programs. It allows for comparison of local norms, state norms, and MiBLSi school project norms. DIBELS progress monitoring is used to track student progress/improvement over time. User friendly graphic representations of data are available with this program, and can be produced by both teachers and administration. Individual student reading data is obtained through Quantitative Reading Inventories GRades 4-8 that are administered and reported three times a year. A performance flow chart based on current student data is used to determine the amount and frequency of assessment requirements for each child. School Improvement Plans are reviewed annually and decisions are made based on that data. Building action plans are reviewed three times per year. Changes are implemented whenever necessary to address identified needs. Teachers take part in data meetings three times a year. These sessions are led by the principal (and other support personnel) who are able to assist teachers as they Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 26 of 34
  27. 27. Gerrish-Higgins School District develop the skills necessary to analyze data within grade level and cross grade level teams. Individual goals are established for all students who are below benchmark standards, and these goals are revised as new data becomes available. Student and school information is collected, identified, and generated through CA 60s, MLPP Reports, NWEA, SWIS, Everyday Math Assessment Reports, Test Whiz, DIBELS, QRI, and DRA. The Title I Comprehensive Data Collection and Results Implementation Process drives targeted skill areas. The supplemental support is fluid and responds and regularly changes in direct response to data results. Through Collaborative Teams we use Gap Analysis Plans, Curriculum Mapping, Everyday Math Pacing Guides and the Title I Comprehensive Data Analysis processes to constantly up-date our instructional practices. We have collaborative planning time for 2 hours each month. Title I supplemental services (K-8) are revised as the result of this data analysis process. The teams then apply the insights obtained through this process to develop curriculum in their classrooms. The climate for the Collaborative Planning Time is such that it promotes a safe environment for thinking out of the box and for taking positive risks. At the high school level course decisions, classroom instruction, and instructional strategies are made based upon the data and how we can best help our students to achieve. Data also drives how each course is designed to meet state content expectations. Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Date collection, analysis and results application is not consistently applied across all grade levels in our district. Standard 2 - Information Management The school/district staff collaborates to derive information from data and use it to support decisions. Benchmark A: Analysis & Interpretation Indicators: V.2.A.1 Systematic Support for Data Analysis: District leaders are experienced in data analysis and assist in training school staff in data analysis techniques. The district provides a range of assessment tools and training in the analysis and use of data for the purpose of reviewing student performance and school and system effectiveness. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We use disaggregated data from a variety of sources (MEAP, NWEA, SWIS, MLPP, DIBELS, Everyday Math, grade-level and department created assessment data) to determine learning priorities, Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 27 of 34
  28. 28. Gerrish-Higgins School District monitor progress, and help sustain continuous improvement. this wealth of data is collected and reviewed. Individual student data is used to make decisions relative to differentiated opportunities for students of all abilities. A response to intervention program, helps to established a multi-level approach to intervention support/services. Instructional decisions are made both at the classroom and district level, and evolve as a result of data collected through a variety of sources. Professional development is on-going and provides opportunities for teachers to incorporate improved teaching strategies supported by research. Collaborative planning time (2.5 hours weekly) provides teachers the opportunity to have meaningful dialogue about effective teaching. Good ideas are routinely shared as a result of this process. Program changes based on data have resulted in changes across the curriculum. These changes include both acquisition of new materials and incorporation of improved practices. Action plans are created and revised by the instructional staff in partnership with the building principal. We are data driven in our district! The data that we compile drives our instruction. DIBELS, NWEA, SWIS, MIACCESS, MLPP, QRI, Title I Comprehensive Needs Assessment (Pre-8), and report cards align with the GLCEs. Gap Analysis is used to define curricular areas of need. Special Education uses AIMS writing probes. We use MEAP results to help focus our writing, and evaluate which students go to extended day. Comprehensive curriculum maps have been compiled and are utilized for each grade level. Backward design units have been put together which incorporate higher level thinking skills. Written documentation of curriculum planning takes place during districtwide PD release time and grade level meetings.Curricular mapping at each grade level follows a prescribed scope and sequence aligned to the state standards. Weekly collaborative sessions among grade level teams allows for review of student data and an opportunity for ongoing discussion of student needs. Common assessments, particularly in writing, are scored as a group. Results of summative assessments are consistently recorded, and analysis of the data is used to plan future instruction. Cross district planning is scheduled annually, and provides additional collaborative time in order to review pacing schedules and curriculum equity from classroom to classroom. Input from teachers is key to the selection and purchase of curricular support materials. Pilot programs are often used to field test researched based programs, and professional development offerings are sufficient to sustain the initiatives provided. (Everyday Math, Four Block Literacy, 6+1 Traits of Writing and Lucy Calkins are examples.) Benchmark B: Applications Indicators: V.2.B.1 Informed Data-Based Decision-Making: System-wide curricular and instructional decisions are based on data and research at all levels. The district structures the decision-making process so that disaggregated data provides the basis for a systematic analysis of instructional and organizational effectiveness, with the results of this analysis employed to improve student and system performance. Response: Getting Started Partially Implemented Implemented Exemplary Evidence: We are data driven in our district! The data that we compile drives our instruction. DIBELS, NWEA, SWIS, MIACCESS, MLPP, QRI, Title I Comprehensive Needs Assessment (Pre-8), report cards align with the GLCEs and at the high school level MME/ACT. Disaggregated data provides the driving Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 28 of 34
  29. 29. Gerrish-Higgins School District force behind all decisions. . Gap Analysis is used to define curricular areas of need. Special Education uses AIMS writing probes. We use MEAP results to help focus our writing, and evaluate which students go to extended day. Comprehensive curriculum maps have been compiled and are utilized for each grade level. Backward design units have been put together which incorporate higher level thinking skills. Written documentation of curriculum planning takes place during districtwide PD release time and grade level meetings.Curricular mapping at each grade level follows a prescribed scope and sequence aligned to the state standards. Weekly collaborative sessions among grade level teams allows for review of student data and an opportunity for ongoing discussion of student needs. Use of departmental PLC groups as well as K-12 curriculum meetings, along with a movement towards building/district-wide PLC groups, establishes a solid foundation from which we can make solid, appropriate curricular decisions.Common assessments, particularly in writing, are scored as a group. Results of summative assessments are consistently recorded, and analysis of the data is used to plan future instruction. Cross district planning is scheduled annually, and provides additional collaborative time in order to review pacing schedules and curriculum equity from classroom to classroom. Input from teachers is key to the selection and purchase of curricular support materials. Pilot programs are often used to field test researched based programs, and professional development offerings are sufficient to sustain the initiatives provided. (Everyday Math, Four Block Literacy, 6+1 Traits of Writing and Lucy Calkins are examples.) Focus Questions 1. What in our systems and practices may be impacting our student achievement goals? Date collection, analysis and results application is not consistently applied across all grade levels in our district. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 29 of 34
  30. 30. Gerrish-Higgins School District Goals Content Area: Math Student Goal Statement: To increase the percentage of student meeting expectations for the MEAP 2009 testing period. In addition, increase students meeting benchmark according to the criteria set forth on the NWEA test. Gap Statement: A percentage of students at the elementary level are not meeting grade level expectations in math. For instance, 87% of the students in third grade met expectations in the MEAP according to the Fall 2008 test. However in the Fall of 2008 at St. Helen Elementary 82% of the students in second grade were not meeting benchmark according to the NWEA Assessment. In addition, 59% in 3rd, and 60% in 4th are not meeting benchmark in math based on the current 08/09 NWEA assessments. At Roscommon Elementary School 2008 MEAP Scores showed Fourth grade students (skills acquired through third grade) scored 83% proficient. Post data trends indicated a decline in proficiency over the past three years of approximately 3% per year. At the middle school level, 17% of the students did not meet grade level expectations acccording to the MEAP data from the Fall 2008 testing. Cause for Gap: The AYP Math targets are: 3=67%, 4=65%, 5= 2%, 6=60%, 7=57% and 8=54%. At the elementary and middle school levels we have certainlly moved students out of the lower categories. Data analysis has revealed several students who's cut scores were very close to the next level. Interventions have been implemented to close the gap for these students to move them into the next level. The gap was identified by MEAP and NWEA results, students were identified and then strategies and services were implemented. The cause for the gap was the fact that without assessment data we were unaware of the exact needs that went beyond the Universal Intructional needs of our students. Key Characteristics Impacted by Goal: None selected Content Area: English Language Arts Student Goal Statement: To increase the percentage of student meeting expectations for DIBELS testing during the 2009/2010 school year. We can track this through the DIBELS progress monitoring process. Gap Statement: A large percentage of students at the elementary level are not meeting grade level expectations in oral reading fluency. For instance, at 1st grade 46% of the students at Roscommon Elementary School and 47% of the students at St. Helen Elementary School are not meeting benchmark in letter naming fluency according to the latest DIBELS test. In addition at 3rd grade, 49% of the students at Roscommon Elementary School and 59% of the students at St. Helen Elementary School are not meeting expectations in oral reading fluency according to the latest DIBELS test. At Roscommon Middle School according to the spring 2009 data, 54% of our students failed to meet the projected goal. Cause for Gap: The AYP Targets for Reading are: 3=60%, 4=59%, 5=57%, 6=56%, 7=54%, and 8=53%. At the elementary and middle school levels we have certainlly moved students out of the lower categories. Data analysis has revealed several students who's cut scores were very close to the next level. Interventions have been implemented to close the gap for these students to move them into the next level. The gap was identified by MEAP and NWEA results, students were identified and then strategies and services were implemented. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 30 of 34
  31. 31. Gerrish-Higgins School District The cause for the gap was the fact that without assessment data we were unaware of the exact needs that went beyond the Universal Intructional needs of our students. Key Characteristics Impacted by Goal: None selected Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 31 of 34
  32. 32. Gerrish-Higgins School District CNA - Conclusion 1. As the district staff reviewed the school and district responses to questions asked about the system processes and practices, (key characteristics at the school level and indicators at the district level) what trends were noticed that may have an impact on student achievement? In reviewing our assessment data and reflecting upon the district curriculum and the instructional practices through-out our district it is very apparent that writing needs to be greatly improved K-12. The Everday Math program utilized K-8 works well but it needs to be monitored through a Pacing Guide to insure that everything is covered in the spiral. If units do not get done then Mathematical Gaps are created. Our reading program has been successful, however, our data indicates at 3rd and 4th grade in both of our elementary buildings that the CORE Curriculum needed to be more intentionally taught. At the Middel school level it has become apparent that it is very difficualt for the teaching staff to complete and respond to data. Both Elmementary Buildings in our district made AYP and were awarded an "A" on our Michigan School Report Card and are on Step 0 in regards to AYP. The Middle School also made AYP, achieved a "B" on the Michigan School Report Card and are also on Step 0. However, the reflections in this section must be addressed in order for student achievement to continue to improve. 2. What did the district staff identify as over-arching system challenges that would need to be addressed at the district level? At the building level? Writing must be systematically and intentionally taught through out the district. St. Helen Elementary is currently Piloting for the district an Assessment/Instruction Writing Program called, "My Access". Students type in their narratives and are immediately given feed back based on the MEAP 6 point rubric. The program assesses the writing sample and scores it instantly. The students are then directed to very specific activities to address the types of errors they made in the writing sample. This was our first full year of Piloting the Program and we have obtained some fantastic results. As a district we have indentified that a need for assessing writing and responding to that assessemnt has been an over-arching sytem challenge for us. Roscommon Elementary has been using the Lucy Cawkins Writing materials and have even provided a Title I Teacher who goes in and models the lessons in every classroom once a week. Due to staff cuts the Middle School and High School are experiecing tremendous instructional delivery difficulties. The budget is a real part of our world which greatly henders our efforts. 3. What process did the district used to complete the Comprehensive Needs Assessment for the district? Each building team through out the district, consisting of multiple stakeholders, contributed to the District Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report. The actual assessment pieces were collected by the Title I Staff,however all staff contributed to administering the assessment instruments. Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 32 of 34
  33. 33. Gerrish-Higgins School District Report - Summary Indicators Getting Partially Implemented Exemplary Started Implemented Strand I - Teaching For Learning Standard 1 - Curriculum Benchmark A - Aligned, Reviewed & Monitored I.1.A.1 Aligned, Coherent and Inclusive Curriculum Benchmark B - Communicated I.1.B.1 Communicated and Articulated Curriculum Standard 2 - Instruction Benchmark A - Planning I.2.A.1 Systematic Planning for Quality Instruction Benchmark B - Delivery I.2.B.1 Coherent and Effective Support for the Delivery of Instruction Standard 3 - Assessment Benchmark A - Aligned to Curriculum & Instruction I.3.A.1 Use of Multiple Measures to Support School-wide Decision-making Strand II - Leadership Standard 1 - Instructional Leadership Benchmark A - Educational Program II.1.A.1 High Standards and Clear Expectations Benchmark B - Instructional Support II.1.B.1 Culture of Collaboration II.1.B.2 Instructional Program Coherence Standard 2 - Shared Leadership Benchmark A - School Culture & Climate II.2.A.1 Coordinated Policies and Procedures Benchmark B - Continuous Improvement II.2.B.1 Culture of Collective Responsibility II.2.B.2 Continuous Improvement Standard 3 - Operational and Resource Management Benchmark A - Resource Allocation II.3.A.1 Accountability and Strategic Resource Allocation Strand III - Personnel and Professional Learning Standard 1 - Personnel Qualifications Benchmark A - Requirements III.1.A.1 Highly Qualified Personnel Standard 2 - Professional Learning Benchmark A - Collaboration III.2.A.1 Coordinated Professional Development Based Upon Common Principles Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 33 of 34
  34. 34. Gerrish-Higgins School District Report - Summary: Continued..... Indicators Getting Partially Implemented Exemplary Started Implemented Strand IV - School and Community Relations Standard 1 - Parent/Family Involvement Benchmark A - Communication IV.1.A.1 Purposeful Communication and Collaborative Relationships Standard 2 - Community Involvement Benchmark A - Communication IV.2.A.1 Purposeful Communication and Collaborative Relationships Strand V - Data Management Standard 1 - Data Management Benchmark A - Data Generation V.1.A.1 Comprehensive, Accessible and Meaningful Data System Standard 2 - Information Management Benchmark A - Analysis & Interpretation V.2.A.1 Systematic Support for Data Analysis Benchmark B - Applications V.2.B.1 Informed Data-Based Decision-Making Comprehensive Needs Assessment Report: DRAFT COPY Page 34 of 34

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