Kentucky’s National History Day
What is National History Day? <ul><li>NHD is a project-based education program that engages students in the process of dis...
Categories <ul><li>Exhibit </li></ul><ul><li>Documentary </li></ul><ul><li>Paper (individual only) </li></ul><ul><li>Perfo...
Who participates? <ul><li>Students in grades 6-12 (individual or group) </li></ul><ul><li>Compete in District, State, and ...
Requirements <ul><li>Each category has rules associated with it. </li></ul><ul><li>All PROJECTS must have an annotated bib...
Theme <ul><li>Theme is very general and changes from year to year.  </li></ul><ul><li>This year’s theme is “The Individual...
Student Interview <ul><li>Students are interviewed at the contests. </li></ul><ul><li>Judges are usually history teachers,...
Rubric --Students can improve their projects between contests.
Academic Expectations and Core Content Standards met by NHD <ul><li>Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>2.20: Students underst...
District Contests <ul><li>District 1, Murray State University, March 14 </li></ul><ul><li>District 2, Kentucky Wesleyan Co...
 
State and National Contests <ul><li>State </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, Frankfort  </...
History Day Project <ul><li>It is not a book report, students will have to think about their topics, ask questions, find a...
Selecting a Topic <ul><li>Students should choose a topic that… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>INTERESTS  them </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Doing Research <ul><li>Students need both primary and secondary sources.  </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary sources are not crea...
Where Should Students Do Research? <ul><ul><li>Libraries (school, public, and University) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Histo...
Going Beyond the Book Report <ul><li>NHD projects do more than tell a story, they make a point about a topic. A thesis sta...
Benefits for Teachers <ul><li>Project-based teaching tool  </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals to various learning styles </li></ul>...
Benefits for Students <ul><li>Makes learning about history fun! </li></ul><ul><li>Shows students that history is alive and...
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Kentuckys National History Day 08 09

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An introductory powerpoint about Kentucky's National History Day program.

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Kentuckys National History Day 08 09

  1. 1. Kentucky’s National History Day
  2. 2. What is National History Day? <ul><li>NHD is a project-based education program that engages students in the process of discovery and interpretation of historical topics. It is like a science fair for history. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Categories <ul><li>Exhibit </li></ul><ul><li>Documentary </li></ul><ul><li>Paper (individual only) </li></ul><ul><li>Performance </li></ul><ul><li>Web Site (group and individual combined) </li></ul>
  4. 4. Who participates? <ul><li>Students in grades 6-12 (individual or group) </li></ul><ul><li>Compete in District, State, and National Contests </li></ul>
  5. 5. Requirements <ul><li>Each category has rules associated with it. </li></ul><ul><li>All PROJECTS must have an annotated bibliography with separated secondary and primary sources. </li></ul><ul><li>All PROJECTS (except Paper) must have a Process Paper. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Theme <ul><li>Theme is very general and changes from year to year. </li></ul><ul><li>This year’s theme is “The Individual in History.” Other themes have been “Taking a Stand in History” and “Triumph and Tragedy” </li></ul>
  7. 7. Student Interview <ul><li>Students are interviewed at the contests. </li></ul><ul><li>Judges are usually history teachers, public historians, or librarians. </li></ul><ul><li>Judges ask students questions like: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did you pick this topic? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How did you do your research? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why is your topic significant? </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Rubric --Students can improve their projects between contests.
  9. 9. Academic Expectations and Core Content Standards met by NHD <ul><li>Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>2.20: Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-06-5.11, SS-07-5.1.1, and SS-08-5.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources) to describe and explain historical events and conditions and to analyze </li></ul><ul><li>the perspectives of different individuals and groups (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, age, economic status, religion, political group) in </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. history prior to Reconstruction. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-07-5.1.2 and SS-08-5.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those </li></ul><ul><li>relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-8-HP-U-2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will understand that U.S. History can be analyzed by examining significant eras (Exploration as it relates to the settlement of America, </li></ul><ul><li>The Great Convergence, Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and the New Nation, Expansion and Reform, Civil War) to develop </li></ul><ul><li>chronological understanding and recognize cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-8-HP-S-1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interpretative nature of history using a variety of tools and resources (e.g., primary and </li></ul><ul><li>secondary sources, Internet, timelines, maps) </li></ul><ul><li>High School </li></ul><ul><li>2.20: Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources, data, artifacts) to analyze perceptions and perspectives (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, </li></ul><ul><li>nationality, age, economic status, religion, politics, geographic factors) of people and historical events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States History </li></ul><ul><li>(Reconstruction to present). </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will analyze how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause and effect relationships, tying past to present. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.2.1 through SS-HS-5.2.7— History of the United States </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.3.1 through SS-HS-5.3.6—History of the World </li></ul>
  10. 10. District Contests <ul><li>District 1, Murray State University, March 14 </li></ul><ul><li>District 2, Kentucky Wesleyan College, March 21 </li></ul><ul><li>District 3, University of Louisville, TBA </li></ul><ul><li>District 4, Western Kentucky University—not until 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>District 5, Eastern Kentucky University, March 21 </li></ul><ul><li>District 6, Georgetown College, February 28 </li></ul><ul><li>District 7, Morehead State University, March 7 </li></ul><ul><li>District 8, Southeast Community and Technical College, March 20 </li></ul>
  11. 12. State and National Contests <ul><li>State </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, Frankfort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>April 18, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nationals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>College Park, Maryland </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>June 14-18, 2009 </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. History Day Project <ul><li>It is not a book report, students will have to think about their topics, ask questions, find answers, and develop their own conclusions. </li></ul><ul><li>Students must “do history,” instead of just read about in a textbook. Students discover topic, instead of being told about their topic. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Selecting a Topic <ul><li>Students should choose a topic that… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>INTERESTS them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relates to the THEME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has a NARROWED FOCUS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Topics can be… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local, State, U.S. History, or World History </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to pick topic at least 25 years old. </li></ul></ul>
  14. 15. Doing Research <ul><li>Students need both primary and secondary sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary sources are not created first-hand. </li></ul><ul><li>History Textbook </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedias </li></ul><ul><li>Books or articles written by scholars about a topic </li></ul><ul><li>Primary sources are materials directly related to a topic by time or participation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Letters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speeches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diaries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Newspaper or magazine articles from the time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oral History Interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manuscripts/Paper collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Songs and Hymns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photographs and artifacts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Court Proceedings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government records, including census data </li></ul></ul>
  15. 16. Where Should Students Do Research? <ul><ul><li>Libraries (school, public, and University) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical societies and/or museums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contact college professors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Archival Collections at organizations (i.e. corporations, YMCA, etc.) </li></ul></ul>
  16. 17. Going Beyond the Book Report <ul><li>NHD projects do more than tell a story, they make a point about a topic. A thesis statement makes an argument about the historical impact of the person, event, pattern, or idea you are studying. Often, it answers historical questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions like: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why is my topic significant? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has my topic influenced anything else of historical importance? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What changed as a result of my topic? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What causes led up to my topic? </li></ul></ul>
  17. 18. Benefits for Teachers <ul><li>Project-based teaching tool </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals to various learning styles </li></ul><ul><li>Can be incorporated into class (theme is always very general) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches history core content (primary sources, secondary sources, timelines, and artifacts are used to interpret history and historical perspective) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches literacy (research, reading, and writing) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches students to analyze and think critically. </li></ul><ul><li>Helps teachers integrate the study of history with other disciplines, including writing and the arts. </li></ul>
  18. 19. Benefits for Students <ul><li>Makes learning about history fun! </li></ul><ul><li>Shows students that history is alive and relevant to their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Lets students be creative and not just learn about history through a textbook. It’s hands-on. </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn important life skills and research skills that will help them in high school and college </li></ul><ul><li>Engages all kinds of learners.  </li></ul><ul><li>Encourages students to use their community’s resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Gives incentives to do well: Special Prizes/Scholarships at all levels of competition. </li></ul><ul><li>Chances to improve their work and compete at three levels of competitions. </li></ul>

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