Copyright version 3 k binns

383 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
383
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
34
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Give group a few minutes to think and talk about the question. Review answers as a group. Talk about how creation=copyright with the last bullet point.
  • Copyright does not mean you cannot use material, but it does mean that the way you use it is limited.
  • Tell audience that they must go through this process to determine if they are using the materials correctly under the fair use laws for educators.Added an image
  • Added bold text to break up the slide and centered heading. Removed “Most Likely”– the disclaimer at the bottom of the slide informs audience that they need to be thoughtful about their use of materials.Added numeral to link slide to the idea of FOUR factors.
  • Added bold text to break up the slide and centered heading. Removed “Most Likely”– the disclaimer at the bottom of the slide informs audience that they need to be thoughtful about their use of materials.Adjusted position of columns to match columns on previous slideAdded numeral to link slide to the idea of FOUR factors.
  • Added numeral to link slide to the idea of FOUR factors.
  • Added bold text to break up the slide and centered heading. Removed “Most Likely”– the disclaimer at the bottom of the slide informs audience that they need to be thoughtful about their use of materials.Adjusted position of columns to match columns on previous slideAdded numeral to link slide to the idea of FOUR factors.
  • Reduced number of words significantly
  • Spaced links further apart to utilize full space of the slide.Added simple graphic.
  • Public Domain and Orphan Works are exactly what they sound like--- materials without copyright. . Prior to use you must make a good faith effort to find the author. This will protect you under the Good Faith Fair Use Defense
  • Libraries are undergoing a mass digitization of materials that are no longer protected under copyright. Check online for a database. Open Library: over 1 million books available--- includes Shakespeare, Alice in Wonderland, Dracula. (million written numerically to give a visual effect) OER Commons: provides online textbooks, science inquiry lessons, classroom management tips, and much more. FREE and OPEN!
  • If you find a resource that would enhance your classroom, but cannot find the author or entity that is responsible for it, you may still be able to use it. If the author does emerge, you will most likely be protected under the Good Faith Fair Use Defense.
  • The TEACH Act (Technology, Education, and Copyright Harmonization Act) clarified how materials may be used when in distance learning. Prior to the TEACH Act, educators providing online courses were not able to share resources as easily as educators in a traditional classroom. If you are providing online courses, please review the Copyright Clearance Center's information page to fully understand copyright allowances.
  • As an educator it is your responsibility to model fair use of all materials and ensure that your students are doing the same. Stay informed and use materials fairly.
  • Copyright version 3 k binns

    1. 1. Copyrighted Materials and the Educational Setting<br />Kate Binns<br />September 1, 2011<br />
    2. 2. How do you feel about copyright?<br />Don’t worry! Soon you’ll <br />be an expert!<br />
    3. 3. Copyright--- What does it mean to you?<br />Do you know how identify materials for your classroom without infringing on copyright? <br /><ul><li>Did you think about this -- © ?
    4. 4. The moment something original is created it is protected under copyright law. This means that everything on the internet is protected by copyright, unless identified as public domain.</li></li></ul><li>Use of Copyrighted Material<br />“Copyright law provides educators with a separate set of rights in addition to fair use, to display (show) and perform (show or play) others' works in the classroom. These rights are in Section 110(1) of the Copyright Act and apply to any work, regardless of the medium.” Georgia K. Harper, “The Copyright Crash Course”<br />
    5. 5. Four Fair Use Factors<br />Ask yourself:<br />What is the character of the use?<br />What is the nature of the work you are using?<br />How much of the work will you use?<br />What effect would this use have on the market for the original or for permissions if they were widespread?<br />
    6. 6. What is the character of the use?<br />Not Fair Use<br />Commercial<br />Fair Use<br />Nonprofit<br />Educational<br />Personal<br />These are simply guidelines, if you have a question about the manner in which you are using material please research it further. You can get permission to use copyrighted works, so don’t be discouraged if your use is not consider fair use.<br />
    7. 7. What is the nature of the work you are using?<br />Not Fair Use<br />Imaginative Works<br />Unpublished Works<br />Fair Use<br />Factual Works<br />Published Works<br />These are simply guidelines, if you have a question about the manner in which you are using material please research it further. You can get permission to use copyrighted works, so don’t be discouraged if your use is not consider fair use.<br />
    8. 8. How much of the work will you use?<br />Not Fair Use<br />More than a small amount<br />Fair Use<br />Small Amount<br />(1 chapter, a poem, short story, essay, graph or illustration)<br />These are simply guidelines, if you have a question about the manner in which you are using material please research it further. You can get permission to use copyrighted works, so don’t be discouraged if your use is not consider fair use.<br />
    9. 9. What effect would this have on the market for the original or for permissions if they were widespread?<br />Not Fair Use<br />Competes with original<br />Avoids paying for use. <br />Fair Use<br />Original is out of print or otherwise unavailable<br />Copyright owner is unidentifiable<br />No market available for permission <br />These are simply guidelines, if you have a question about the manner in which you are using material please research it further. You can get permission to use copyrighted works, so don’t be discouraged if your use is not consider fair use.<br />
    10. 10. Getting Permission<br />A class set allows you use it in your classroom.<br /> Check the Copyright Clearance Centerfor instant permission.<br />Contacts for attaining permission can found at: Copyright Crash Course.<br />Always make sure that you receive permission in writing from the author or controlling entity of the material.<br />
    11. 11. Resources for Fair Use Guidelines<br />University of Minnesota's Fair Use Analysis Tool<br />Center for Social Media-- Fair Use<br />Copyright Clearance Center<br />University of Maryland University College<br />
    12. 12. Using Public Domain and Orphan Works<br />Public Domain: expired copyright or never had a copyright. <br />Resources: Cornell University Copyright Information Center<br />Orphan Works: materials without a clear author, despite an exhaustive search. <br />Resources: Good Faith Fair Use Defense<br />
    13. 13. Public Domain Resources<br />Open Library: more than1,000,000 books available!<br />OER Commons: textbooks, science inquiry lessons, classroom management tips, and much more. <br />
    14. 14. Public Domain Images<br />Instead of using Google Images try one of these public domain photo and clip art resources:<br />Photo8<br />Free Digital Photos<br />Discovery Education ClipArt<br />Wylio<br />Public Domain Pictures<br />
    15. 15. Orphan Works<br />What if you can’t find the owner of an essential classroom resource?<br />You must first search, search, search!<br />Your use will likely be protected under the Good Faith Fair Use Defense.<br />Who wrote me?!<br />Who’s my publisher?!<br />
    16. 16. TEACH Act<br /> Allows educators leading online classrooms to share the same materials as in-person classrooms.<br />More information on copyright allowances found at: Copyright Clearance Center's. <br />
    17. 17. Why is this important information?<br />You must model what you teach! Ensure that your students understand how to use materials by showing it daily.<br />If you or your students violate copyright, you can be held accountable for each offense and fined for up to $150,000 for each act!<br />
    18. 18. I hope you feel…<br />
    19. 19. Reference Page<br />Harper, G.K. (2007). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/ <br />

    ×