Karl_Johnson CV 2016 -17

183 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
183
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Karl_Johnson CV 2016 -17

  1. 1. **Full Version CV** Dr. Karl Ellis Johnson 105 Churchill Avenue Somerset, N.J. 08873 Cell (908) 507-3733 E- mail: kjohnsonramapo.edu@gmail.com Skype: kjohnson333 Rank: Associate Professor of The School of Humanities & Global Studies: African American Studies and Chair (Convener & Asst. Chair) of Africana Studies Convening Group at Ramapo College of New Jersey at 505 Ramapo Valley Road, Mahwah, N.J. 07430 the top Public Liberal Arts College I. Ramapo College-Record of Actions Fall 2015 Co-Chair Africana Studies School of Humanities and Global Studies (SSHGS) Fall 2010 Appointed to Graduate School Faculty (MALS) Fall 2010 Senior Editor “Cultural Journal” Ramapo College Spring 2009 Chair Africana Studies Group (SSHS)-name changed from African American Studies to reflect our African * Diaspora Dimension Spring 2008 Appointed Chair of Subcommittee on General Education for College States Accreditation Feb. 2008 Appointed by President of College as member of Steering Committee for College States Accreditation Spring 2007 Co-Chair (Co-Convener) African Americans Studies Group Fall 2007 Tenured Associate Professor of African-American Studies Fall 2006 Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of African-American Studies Fall 2005 Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of African-American History 9/2002 to 8/05 Initial Appointment: Temporary Assistant Professor of History, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Mahwah, NJ. Taught courses African-American History I( Before 1865 )and II (after 1865), African Americans in Film, The Age of Segregation 1865-1919, The Black Power Years 1965-80, Social Issues (Current & Historical Issues of Class, Gender, Ethnicity, & Race), Contemporay Africa, Introduction to U.S. History I & II, U.S. Relations toward Africa & its Diaspora, and Introduction to African Studies. Some of the above courses have been converted to the hybrid and/or online format as well. I performed all fulltime college professor duties, including student advisement and involvement in important faculty meetings. Ramapo is one of the TOP ranked public, liberal arts institution of its kind in the Northeast. 1
  2. 2. II. Education Background Ph.D. in History, Temple University, date awarded January 2001 Dissertation Title: “Black Philadelphia in Transition: The African-American Struggle on the Homefront During World War II and the Cold War, 1941-1963.” Advisor: Dr. Kenneth Kusmer Reader: V.P. Franklin, Editor of The Journal of African American History Fields of concentration: African-American History, African History, Diplomatic History, Third World History, Urban History, and United States History MA in History, Rutgers Univ. Graduate School-Newark, awarded May 1996 MA Thesis Title: “Herbert Hoover’s Change of Policy toward Haiti, 1929-1930: His Commission and its Impact on Ending the U.S. Military Occupation of Haiti, 1929-1930.” Advisor: Dr. Warren F. Kimball Fields of concentration: African-American History, Diplomatic History, History of U.S. Foreign Relations toward the Caribbean & Latin America, and United States History. BA in Economics and History, Rutgers College, New Brunswick, NJ, awarded May 1987. BA History Thesis: “The Zabatisu of Japan” Training in Experiential Technology and Revenue Producing Online Education: April 2009, “Certificate of Completion Moodle 102-Online Course Facilitation. 4 Star MRCT. Chief Instructors: Gina Russell Stevens and Shelia D. Gatling MOODLEROOMS, INC., 190 W. Ostend St. Suite, 110. Baltimore, MD 21230 January 2009, Internet Online Course Creation “Certificate of Completion” Moodle 101-Course Management System. Instructors: Gina Russell Stevens and Shelia D. Gatling MOODLEROOMS, INC. Johns Hopkins Eastern Campus, 1101 East 33rd Street, Suite A306 Baltimore, MD 21218-3637 Sept. 2006-2008, Internet Online WebCT-Black Board Course Management System training,--Online Course Design, by Instructional Design Dept at Ramapo College Of NJ. III. University Work Experience Outside Ramapo College 8/20-23/2008 Visiting Professor & researcher at the University of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, Africa. I gave a lecture and workshop for Graduate Students and faculty on the topic of “African Influences in American Cultures.” I spent 3 days of research at 2
  3. 3. the Ethiopian Studies department and Museum examining primary materials on the 3000 year history of Ethiopian Civilization. 9/01 to 6/05 African-American Studies History Instructor, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ. I teach evening and summer courses in African-American History Before 1865 and After 1865. I perform all lectures, counsel students, created the syllabi, selected the readings, marked papers and exams, and gave final grades to undergraduate students. The College of NJ is an award winning academic institution. 1/01 to 5/01 History Instructor, Temple University-Ambler Campus I taught a 3rd World history course, which covered Africa, Asia, and Latin America from 1500 to the present. I performed independently all lectures, counseled students, created the syllabi, selected the readings, marked papers and exams, and gave final grades. Ambler is a suburban campus of Temple University. 9/00 to 12/00 History Instructor, Temple University-Ambler Campus Taught introduction American history course “History of the United States 1877- Present.” I performed independently all lectures, counseled students, created the syllabi, selected the readings, marked papers and exams, and gave final grades. 9/97 to 12/00 History Teacher Assistant, Temple University - Main Campus, Philadelphia I assisted Professors and department in research and curriculum development for undergraduate history courses, “Race and Ethnicity” and “History of the U.S. 1600-1877.” I graded exams and papers, counseled undergraduate students, and held weekly historical discussion sessions with an average of 45 undergraduate students. I also gave periodic lectures on my topics of specialization in student halls, which averaged 100 undergraduates. 9/96 to 8/97 History Instructor, Rutgers University-Newark, NJ I independently taught 3 Afro-American history courses—fall 1996, spring 1997, and summer 1997. I independently taught both sections “1600 to the Civil War” and “Reconstruction to Present.” I performed all lectures, counseled students, created the syllabi, selected the readings, marked papers and exams, and gave final grades to over 120 undergraduate students. Newark is an urban campus of Rutgers University. 1/95 to 5/96 History Instructor, New Jersey Institute of Technology-Newark, NJ Independently taught 4 courses in Afro-American history—2 in spring 1995, 1 in fall 1995, and 1 in spring 1996. I taught both sections “1600 to the Civil War” and “Reconstruction to Present.” I independently performed all lectures, counseled students, created the syllabi, selected the readings, marked papers and exams, and gave final grades to over 160 undergraduate students. NJIT is an award winning science and technical college. December 1-3, 2016, Conference for the 49th Conference of the African Studies Association (ASA) with Theme: Imagining Africa at the Center: Bridging Scholarship, Policy, and Representation in African Studies held 3
  4. 4. in Washington , DC: I will present my paper titled “The current status of African, Medieval Manuscripts & Historic sites in Djenne and Timbuktu, Mali: Their present situation and the future prospects of the protection of these cultural treasures for scholarship & posterity.” This even will take place at the Washington Marriot at Wardman Park PREVIOUS PRIVATE SECTOR EMPLOYMENT HISTORY: Other Skills and Employment Supervisory and Technology Management: 1992 to 1994 Assistant Manager and Technical Trainer for Sprint-United Telephone’s Business Office, 160 Center Street Clinton, NJ Manager of 45 subordinates for customer service compliance in competitive high tech communications industry. Responsible for making daily decisions on budget and financial matters regarding the selling of technical and communication products for the office. Responsible for testing new technology before it was given to out important business customers. 1989 to 1992 Supervisor of Telephone Technicians for United Telephone (Newton and Sparta, NJ) Manager of 15 technicians in the satellite office in Sparta. Responsible for maintaining office, ordering of supplies for warehouse, security for a 100 million dollars worth of communications equipment, and making sure technicians do quality work in the field. Had to maintain good public relations with neighbors and community, which was crucial for customer service compliance. Fiscal Responsibility and Financial Management: 1996 to 2000 Summit Bank, Part-time and Summer Teller, Hillsborough, NJ Responsible for handling millions of dollars worth of transactions weekly, and providing satisfactory customer service. I regularly opened up new accounts and was responsible for the operation and the maintenance of the bank’s cash machine, which contains a daily average $75,000. 1987 to 1989 Banker, Management, Track, Customer Service Representative for Emigrant Savings Bank, New York, NY Emigrant Bank is a major savings bank in New York City that has branches in midtown Manhattan and Wall Street. I was responsible for solving problems with financial accounts 4
  5. 5. that totaled a million dollars weekly. I also gave advice and managed financial accounts. Sold banking products, such as Mortgages, CDs, IRAs, etc. and provided exceptional customer service in the most diverse city in the nation. Given numerous training courses on financial management, public relations, and the banking industry. IV. Candidate’s Teaching Profile A. Courses taught (last 14 years) are Either Traditional, Fully Online Courses or Hybrid Courses 1. African-American History I: 1600 to Civil War, 200 level: (last 14 yrs fall, spr., summer) at College of NJ & Ramapo College. (Taught traditional way and as online course) 2. African-American History II- and Civil War to Present, 200 level (last 14 yrs fall, spr., summer) at College of NJ & Ramapo College. (Taught traditional way and as online course) 3. African-Americans in Film, 200 level (last 10 yrs spr.) at Ramapo College 4. African American Social & Political Thought at Ramapo College (Taught traditional way and as online course 10 years) 5. Contemporary Africa, 200 Level (last 9 years ) at Ramapo College (Taught traditional way and as online course) 6. Social Issues, 100 level (last 12 years fall, spr.) at Ramapo College. (Taught traditional way and as online course) 7. The Age of Segregation, 300 level (for 7 years ) at Ramapo College Hybrid 8. The Black Power Years, 300 level (for 5 years ) at Ramapo College. Hybrid 9. Third World History (1 semester) at Temple University 10. U.S. Relations toward Africa and its Diaspora, 300 level (3 semesters) at Ramapo College 11. United States History I & II 1600 to Present, 100 level ( last 12 years-mainly summer, but also fall & Spring) at Temple University and Ramapo College (called Introduction to U.S. History I & II) 12. Introduction to African Studies, 200 level (Last 9 years) at Ramapo College. (Taught traditional way and as online course) Graduate: 13. Does Race Matter? Fall 2012, Spr 2016 (2 years) 14. I have also done a wide array of Independent Studies and Class Lectures: on “AA in the Civil War,” “Africa”, “Slavery and the Middle Passage,” “Black Migration,” “Black Political & Intellectual Thought,”“Race and Ethnicity,” “History of the Ethiopian Church,”“History of African Muslims in Ameri,.” “History of Pre- Colonial West Africa,””The Life and Times of Malcolm X.” “The History of Blacks in NJ & NY, 1613-1863” “Rise and Fall of the Negro Leagues”(last 8 years) at Temple University and Ramapo College. 5
  6. 6. Some of the above courses have been converted to the online format (Long Distance Learning format) as well. B. Scholarship 1. Publication/Exhibits/Performance 1. Karl Johnson, Trouble Won’t Last: Postwar Black Philadelphia, Race, and Activism, 1944-1963 [Kindle Edition](Seattle: Kindle Direct Publishing, 2012) E- book ISBN: 978-1-62620-031-9 2. Karl Johnson, “Trouble Won’t Last: Black Church Resurrection and Activism in Postwar Philadelphia,” in African American Urban History Since World War II, eds. Kenneth L. Kusmer and Joe William Trotter, Jr. (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 2009) ISBN: 10-0-226-46510-1 3. Karl Johnson, “Police-Black Community Relations in Postwar Philadelphia: Race and Criminalization in Urban Social Spaces, 1945-1960,” The Journal of African American History Vol. 89, No. 2 (Spring 2004): 118-134. (Refereed) 4. Karl Johnson, “Black Philadelphia in Transition: The African-American Struggle on the Homefront During World War II and the Cold War, 1941-1963” (Ph.D. diss., Temple University, 2000). 5. Karl Johnson, “Herbert Hoover’s Change of Policy toward Haiti, 1929-1930: His Commission and its Impact on Ending the U.S. Military Occupation of Haiti, 1929-1930” (Master’s Thesis, Rutgers University, NJ, 1996). 6. Karl Johnson, “The Last Word: America Should Play Waiting Game in Haiti,” Emerge 6 (October 1994): 72. 7. Karl Johnson, “Liquor Stores Verses Community,” The North Jersey Herald & News, 4 February 1993, 6 (A). Book Reviews: Karl Johnson on Democracy Abroad, Lynching at Home: Racial Violence in Florida. By Tameka Bradley Hobbs. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2015. Pp.273. Paper $74.95. for the The Journal of African American History accepted (2016 or 2017). (Refereed) Karl Johnson on Making a Way Out of No Way: African American Women and the Second Great Migration. By Lisa Krissoff Boehmis. (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009. 297 pp. for the Journal of American Ethnic History ( 2012) (Refereed) Karl Johnson on Philadelphia Divided: Race and Politics in the City of Brotherly Love. By James Wolfinger. (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina 6
  7. 7. Press, 2007. 336 pp. for the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 132, No. 3 (July 2008): p 294. (Refereed) Karl Johnson on Robert O. Self. American Babylon: Race and the Struggle for Postwar Oakland. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005 [2003]. Pp. 408. Cloth $49.95, paper $19.95. for the The Journal of African American History Vol. 92, No. 1 (Winter 2007): 137-139. (Refereed) *Specialized Journal Reviewer October 2014, for all Peer Reviewed Articles, on Police/ Black Community Relations for the prestigious “Journal of Urban History.” Works in Progress: 1. December 1-3, 2016, Conference for the 49th Conference of the African Studies Association (ASA) with Theme: Imagining Africa at the Center: Bridging Scholarship, Policy, and Representation in African Studies held in Washington , DC: I will present my paper titled “The current status of African, Medieval Manuscripts & Historic sites in Djenne and Timbuktu, Mali: Their present situation and the future prospects of the protection of these cultural treasures for scholarship & posterity.” This even will take place at the Washington Marriot at Wardman Park 2. Karl Johnson, When We Were Working Class?: The myth that Class began to succeeded Race in 1970s urban America, a Novel [Kindle Edition](Seattle: Kindle Direct Publishing, 2017-2018) E-book & Printed Conferences Attended and Scholarly Presentations Upcoming December 1-3, 2016, Conference for the 49th Conference of the African Studies Association (ASA) with Theme: Imagining Africa at the Center: Bridging Scholarship, Policy, and Representation in African Studies held in Washington , DC: I will present my paper titled “The current status of African, Medieval Manuscripts & Historic sites in Djenne and Timbuktu, Mali: Their present situation and the future prospects of the protection of these cultural treasures for scholarship & posterity.” This even will take place at the Washington Marriot at Wardman Park June 1-4, 2016 in Africa- Dakar, Senegal, I participated in workshop development at a joint conference of the American Anthropological Association and African Studies Association and hosted by Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa ((CODESRIA) and the West African Research Center (WARC). Titled : "Innovation, Transformation and Sustainable Futures in Africa. This event, took place at the Novotel Dakar Hotel. 7
  8. 8. November 1, 2013, Conference for the 7th Biennial Conference of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD), held October 30-November 2, 2013 in Santo Domingo, The Dominican Republic, selected paper for presentation. Part of the Ramapo College panel entitled: Messages to Africa from the African Diaspora “Voices of Concern from the African Diaspora about Timbuktu, Mali & the Destruction of Black African, Medieval Manuscripts & Historic sites: Is Djenne Next?” November 10, 2011, I was part of a scholarly panel for the Global Challenge Lecture Series titled “Horn of Africa” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “Roukema Center for International Education” to comment on the current social and political issues facing African nation’s, such as Somalia, the Sudan, South Sudan, Eritrea, and Ethiopia. I gave a The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after the presentation and panel discussions. November 5, 2011, I presented a paper and actively participated at the prestigious conference of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD), held November 3-6, 2011 at the University of Pittsburgh. The theme of the Conference was: African Liberation & Black Power: Challenges of Diasporic Encounters Across Time, Space, and Imagination. My first panel was titled: Black Power and Education in the Diaspora and I presented a paper titled “Effectiveness of Afro-centric, Freedom, and Black Cultural Schools in Teaching about the Africa Diaspora during the Black Power Era” November 19, 2010, I organized a scholarly trip for the Ramapo Africana Convening group to attend panels and workshops at the New School in New York City. The Conference was titled “From Impunity to Accountability: Africa’s Development in the 21st Century.” The panels included topics relevant to modern Africa, such as Accountability, Democracy, and Development: Can the State Deliver?; Making the State Accountable: Initial Conditions and Roadmaps for the Future; and Models of the Past and New Paradigms: Evaluations Based on Country Experiences. October 1, 2010, I presented a paper at the prestigious Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) 95th National Meeting. The panel was Education for Economic Empowerment topic of my paper was “Freedom and Liberation Schools: Models of Education for at Risk Students.” The Conference theme was The History of Black Economic Empowerment and it was held in Raleigh, North Carolina February 10, 2009, I made a presentation titled “Immigration and the African Diaspora.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “American Democracy Project Café Demos” to do this lecture. I gave a PowerPoint and Internet presentation with my outlines, and political observations from my research of contemporary African Diaspora movements to the USA. The audience consisted 8
  9. 9. of a forum with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation February 25, 2008, I made a presentation titled “Sub-Saharan Africa’s New Economic Relation Ship with China.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “The Culture Club” to do this lecture. I gave a PowerPoint presentation filled with my outline, maps, and political observations from my research of contemporary Africa diverse relationship with China. The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation February 6, 2008, I presented a paper at the prestigious New Jersey Historical Society (founded in 1845) located in New Jersey. I was asked by the organization to become part of their Winter Program for Black History Month that provides services for adult programs, family programs, community colleges, and business lunch patrons. The topic of my paper was is “Carter G. Woodson both the Father of Black History and Inclusion in Education and Scholarship.” The event was well attended and had a fruitful intellectual exchange during the Q & A. October 2007, I presented (2) papers and actively participated at the prestigious conference of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD), held October 9-12, 2007 at the University of the West Indies in Barbados. My first panel was Diaspora in Economic Perspective and I presented a paper titled “China’s New Relationship with Sub-Saharan Africa: Will Chinese Economic Investment Help Lift Africa out from its Neo-Colonialists Past?” Afterwards, I was interviewed by British Broadcasting BBC (West Indies) Radio about my subject matter. I also participated on the panel Cultural Transfer and Transformation in the Diaspora and presented a paper titled “Africanisms and Change in Gullah Culture.” Both presentations were well received and attended by a world renowned group of scholars. April 21, 2006, I was a Moderator of a panel at Ramapo’s 5th Annual “The State of the Africana Professoriate Conference,” titled “Environmental (In) Justice: Katrina and Beyond.” The panel I moderated was titled “Environment, Erasure, and the Katrina Disaster: From Destruction to Development and Survival. It consisted of two knowledgeable scholars on the topic. Also a new video/musical tribute for the Katrina Victims was introduced, and it was warmly received by the audience. February 17, 2006, I presented a paper at the prestigious 27th Southern Conference on African American Studies, Inc. (SCAASI) held in Savannah, Georgia. I was asked to become part of a panel called “The Black Public Sphere in Urban America” that addressed some issues regarding New Orleans and the Katrina incident. The topic of my paper was “Practical Strategies for Educating at Risk Black Urban Students for Today’s Market Economy.” The event attracted scholars from around the nation. 9
  10. 10. February 6, 2006, I made a presentation titled “My Trip to West Africa: Cultural Observations of Ghana and Togo.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “The Culture Club” to do this lecture. I gave a PowerPoint presentation filled with my historical tour, photos, and cultural observations from my summer 2005 trip to Africa. The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum filled with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation April 22, 2005, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s 4th Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate,” titled “Challenges and Strategies for Transcending Social Construction.” I was on the “Educating the Next Generation” special panel. The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “Alternative Ways of Educating Urban and at Risk Students in the New Generation” and it was warmly received by the audience. April 15, 2005, I gave a workshop at the 2nd Annual Ramapo’s African American and Latino Men Conference “A Gathering of Men.” The purpose of the conference was to focus on student development and to help increase the college’s retention rate of minority men, which historically has been a vulnerable population. Here I was able to apply what I learned from the retention workshops from the November 2002, “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. My workshop was titled “Origins of the Modern Prison Industrial Complex, 1945-2000: Philadelphia as a Casestudy.” January 22, 2005, I gave a presentation at the “History Consortium at the Hermitage: Teaching American History Seminar” titled “African Americans and the Civil War.” I was invited to participate in this Federal Grant project by Professor Emeritus Henry Bischoff and Professor Richard Langheim to mentor Bergen County middle and high school teachers to improve the quality of history taught in our public schools. This two-day seminar resulted in increasing the historical literacy of primary school teachers in Bergen County, while demonstrating Ramapo College’s commitment to reaching out to the community November 12-13, 2004, I gave a presentation at the “History Consortium at the Hermitage: Teaching American History Seminar” titled “African Americans in Colonial New Jersey and New York.” I was invited to participate in this Federal Grant project by Professor Emeritus Henry Bischoff and Professor Richard Langheim to mentor Bergen County schoolteachers to improve the quality of history taught in our public schools. This two-day seminar resulted in increasing the historical literacy of primary school teachers in Bergen County, while demonstrating Ramapo College’s commitment to reaching out to the community. October 1, 2004, I presented a paper at the prestigious Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) 89th National Meeting. The topic of my paper was “The African American Intellectual Challenge Against Mis-Education: From Woodson, Cruse, to the Present.” The event was held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and attracted an audience and scholars from around the world. 10
  11. 11. April 16, 2004, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s 3rd Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” This conference was historic because it featured and honored the 50th anniversary of guest speakers, the “Brown Sisters,” who participated in the groundbreaking 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Kansas Board of Education case that outlawed segregation. The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “African-American Intellectuals Against Mis-Education: Before and After Brown vs. the Topeka Board of Education” and it was warmly received by the audience. April 2, 2004, I gave a workshop at the 2nd Annual Ramapo’s African American and Latino Men Conference “A Gathering of Men.” The purpose of the conference was to focus on student development and to help increase the college’s retention rate of minority men, which historically has been a vulnerable population. Here I was able to apply what I learned from the retention workshops from the November 2002, “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. My workshop was titled “How to Work, have Fun, and Graduate with Respectable Grades in College.” I dealt with topics, such as 1) Surviving your Freshman Year Successfully; 2) Choosing the Right Major and Classes; 3) Dealing Positively with Professors and Administrators; 4) What to do if you do not have Money for Books 5) Balancing Work and a Social Life in College; and 6) Preparing to Graduate from College. March 26, 2004, I gave a presentation at the “Why Study Black Studies: The Status of the Discipline in the State of NJ” titled “Core Areas of Knowledge in the Discipline: What are your teaching Imperatives?” I was invited to participate in this statewide conference by members of the African American Program at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey where it was held. November 17, 2003, I made a presentation titled “The African American and Caribbean Connection: From Slavery to Present.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “The Culture Club” to do this lecture. The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum filled with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation September 26, 2003, I presented a paper at the prestigious Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) 88th National Meeting. The topic of my paper was “The Criminalization of African Americans in Philadelphia 1945-1980: Looking for the Foundations of the Modern Prison Industrial Complex.” The event was held at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and attracted an audience and scholars from around the world. April 30, 2003, I did a presentation on “Gullah (West African) Culture in the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia” for the Ramapo College Africana Institute lecture Series “African Spirituality and the Black Church.” The audience consisted of students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after the presentation and the showing of Julia Dash’s acclaimed “Daughters of the Dust.” 11
  12. 12. April 17, 2003, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “The Mis-Education of the African American, Revisited,” and it was warmly received by the audience. April 12, 2003, I presented a paper at Columbia University in the Africana Studies Against Criminal Injustice Conference. The topic of my paper was “The Rise of the Modern Day Criminalization of African-American Philadelphia, 1945-2000.” The event was held at Columbia University’s School of International Affairs in New York City and attracted an audience and scholars from around the world. April 4, 2003, I participated as a sponsor to Ramapo’s African American and Latino Men Conference “A Gathering of Men.” The purpose of the conference was to focus on student development and to help increase the college’s retention rate of minority men, which historically has been a vulnerable population. Here I was able to apply what I learned from the retention workshops from the November 2002, “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. February 19, 2003, at the National Association of African American Studies Conference (NAAAS) held in Houston, Texas, I presented my paper titled “Does Carter G. Woodson’s ‘The Mis-Education of the Negro’ Still Apply Today?” I also represented Ramapo College as a referee at the conference. October 2001, Carnegie Mellon Conference on Black Urban History Seminar titled “African Americans in the Post- Industrial City.” It was held at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA and sponsored by the Ford Foundation, Dr. Joe William Trotter, and Dr. Tera Hunter. At this conference I presented, “Policing Social Space in the Postwar City: African Americans, Law Enforcement, and Recreation in Philadelphia, 1945-1960.” February 1998, at the 3rd Annual Temple University Graduate History Conference at the Center City Campus, 1616 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, I presented, “Ralph J. Bunche and the United States’ Cold War Crisis in the Congo, 1960: His Purpose and Role in the Crisis as United Nations Under Secretary for Special Political Affairs for Peacekeeping Activities.” 3. Past Scholarly Work Completed 1995 to 1996 Research Experience on African Americans in Newark Along with my expertise on blacks in Philadelphia, I also worked as a Research Assistant for the Rutgers University History Department. For a year I worked under the direction of Dr. Clement A. Price, Professor of History, collecting and organizing historical information on the Greater Newark Urban Coalition (GNUC). The research was for the possible use to up date Dr Price’s book Freedom Not far Distant. The GNUC was an organization of community, business, and academic leaders who cared about Newark that orchestrated the revitalization of the city after the 1967 riot. They successfully helped to bring back stability to the city, lobbied for capital, and urged racial harmony, laying the 12
  13. 13. groundwork for Newark’s revitalization. I put together my own work schedule and performed research that took me to various archival sites throughout New Jersey and New York. In the end, my research culminated with a 20 page detailed report. Research Experience in U.S. Foreign Relations toward the 3rd World Research under the direction of Dr. Warren F. Kimball at Rutgers University, produced my M.A. Thesis “Herbert Hoover’s Change of Policy Toward Haiti, 1929-1930: His Commission and its Impact on Ending the U.S. Military Occupation of Haiti, 1929-1930.” This inspired my 1994 article in Emerge titled “The Last word: America Should Play Waiting Game in Haiti.” In 1997 I did extensive research at the United Nations library in New York on the Human Rights issue of ending colonization in Africa that attracted me to Ralph Bunche’s role in the Congo Crisis. This resulted in a paper, “Ralph J. Bunche and the U.S.’ Cold War Crisis in the Congo, 1960: His Purpose and Role in the Crisis as United Nations Under Secretary for Special Political Affairs for Peacekeeping Activities,” presented at the Temple University Graduate History Conference in 1998. C. Contribution to College Fall 2010-Spring 2017-As a member of the Schomburg Committee we have brought numerous high profile speakers from Africa and elsewhere to Ramapo for our students and school. For example in February 2016 we brought to speak and host a reception for Uzodinma Iweala, author of Beasts of No Nation, (Netflix film starring Idris Elba) and Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad author of The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America February 2012-2016, I help host yearly Africana Studies open to public kick off. Every year we have a speaker, artifact display, and discussed the Africana Major and contributions to College. Food and music is usually provided in conjunction with the Culture Club and Cultural Journal. Student organizations and staff are encouraged to attend. The audience consisted of a forum filled with students and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation. December 5, 2012, I made a presentation for the Organization of African Unity annual Kwanzaa Banquet. The event was put together to teach and discuss what your students may want to do in their career. A guest speaker was also brought in named Amanda Seales who attended SUNY Purchase (BA in African American Studies w/ a concentration in the Performing Arts, and Columbia University (Master’s in African American Studies w/ a concentration in hip-hop). She has 10 years’ experience working within the music business as journalist/tv & radio host/recording artist, and is a music expert for VH1 13
  14. 14. February 2012, I helped to get a Schomburg Award to bring to campus scholars Dr. Alondra Nelson Professor of Women & Gender Studies at Columbia University, and Dr. Monique Scott, Director of Cultural Education & Research at the American Museum of National History. They presented “What is Black? Deconstructing Scientific and Social Concepts of Race” to large crowds of students, faculty, and staff. This event was deemed a success and it received positive press for the college November 3, 2011, I made a presentation titled “The African Past.” I was invited by The Ramapo College’s Brothers Making a Difference “BMAD” student organization to do this lecture. The audience consisted of a forum filled with students and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation. July, 2010-June 2011, Middle States Accreditation of College Successfully Completed. Member of Steering Committee, and Chair of Subcommittee on General Education passed accreditation as well. February 24, 2011, I participated on a panel on the topic “Closing the Achievement Gap.” I was invited by The Ramapo College’s Brothers Making a Difference “BMAD” student organization to do this lecture. The audience consisted of a forum filled with students and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation. February 2011, I was awarded a Schomburg Award to bring to campus for the SSHS scholar/artists Bryonn Bain. He has worked as a prison activist and an advocate against racial profiling. His use of Hip Hop and poetry is unique and has been very effective in reaching college age students and educate them about freedom, justice, and equality. Lyrics from Lockdown has had many positive reviews worldwide and at the many colleges he has visited. At Ramapo, he was able to perform well in front of two large crowds of students, faculty, and staff. This event was deemed a success by the SSHS dean and it received positive press for the college 2010-Middle States College Accreditation Meetings and Conferences weekly February 10, 2009, I made a presentation titled “Immigration and the African Diaspora.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “American Democracy Project Café Demos” to do this lecture. I gave a PowerPoint and Internet presentation with my outlines, and political observations from my research of contemporary African Diaspora movements to the USA. The audience consisted of a forum with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation April 18, 2008, I facilitated a Difficult Discussion Presentation on “Examining Modern Day Racism” for Ramapo’s Diversity Action Committee, specially for Ramapo Staff members. Program Description: “I will explore the antagonistic relationship between African Americans and law enforcement officials in the modern period, and the impact police racial profiling had on restricting the black 14
  15. 15. community’s full use of its social space; this has coincided with the criminalization of the black community. For example, many African Americans were fearful in traveling to venues outside their immediate neighborhood because of the threat of possible confrontation with various local policemen. Policemen often reinforced these limitations on black social movement, which were believed by some non-black residents that consisted of negative racial stereotypes about African Americans. This made it acceptable for officials in law enforcement to abandon traditional reform principals and turn to incarceration as a means to control the black population’s movement and competition. Thus I argue that this was the beginning of the modern, criminalization of African Americans that lead to the current prison-industrial complex, which warehouses black persons today.” March 6, 2008 from Feb 27, 2008, I helped to support and organize the Ramapo Africana Film Festival of 2008. This was a college-wide program that engaged students, staff, and professors from different colleges. Numerous guest speakers and film directors were brought that included Paul Robeson, Jr., Bryon Hurt, Gwen Moten in Spike Lee’s “4 Little Girls.” A number of venues were used, such as Berrie Center. I made an opening day presentation on ‘The History of Blacks in Film,” and screened “ That’s Black Entertainment.” Students, Staff, and faculty were invited to a Banquet and screening that followed with a Q&A. The event was sponsored by The Schomburg fund. February 2008, Appointed to the Middles States Re-Accreditation Steering Committee by President Mercer. This selective membership is an all-college membership charged with helping to put together a self-study document and welcome committee to ensure that Ramapo College is Re-accredited as an viable educational Institution again. This time we are charged to do a comprehensive self assessment, which requires many hours of labor outside of classroom teaching and scholarship. However, it is rewarding in that the end result with be a guide for the College to continue to grow and become the world class institution, which is congruent with th mission of the college February 2008, Moderator for welcoming visiting Schomburg Scholar Professor of Political Science and International Relations at Addis Ababa University, Dr. Kissahun Berhanu from Ethiopia who shared his expertise on Africa with the entire Ramapo College Community for the week. Most importantly, Dr. Berhanu was here to launch an international discussion about the relationship between Africa and the rest of the world that will culminate at our Spring 2009, Seventh Biennial State of the Africana Professoriate Conference. Dr. Kassahun Berhanu gave (3) lectures on the following topics that helped to fulfill our Ramapo students’ 5 hour experiential component. Monday, Feb. 25/08, “Conflict Over Resources and Prospects for Durable Peace: Experiences from Ethiopia and the Sudan”; Tuesday, Feb. 26/08, “Constitutional Engineering and Elections as Sources of Legitimacy in Post-Cold War Africa”; and Thursday, Feb. 28/08 “The Ramifications of Decentralized Governance in Contemporary Africa.” March 29, 2007, Chair of the 6th Annual State of the Africana Professoriate Conference, “The Black Familial Structure.” This conference was very timely in 15
  16. 16. light of recent films, such as "The Pursuit of Happiness" and "Daddy's Little Girls" that depict alternative black familial structures. Melvin Van Peebles was the special guest speaker on March 29th, and we built on the previous success of our State of the Africana Professoriate Conference. Thus far this has been a great conference in allowing, new and creative scholarship. September 2006, I accepted a nomination to join the Ramapo College Judicial Board. My experience and campus involvement would be utilized as an asset to the College Judicial Review Board. This is a volunteer experience comprised of Ramapo College faculty, staff, and students. The Board functions as part of the Code of Conduct and is based upon the application of policy, procedure, and impartial due process. The Board is responsible for hearing a case when an alleged violation of the Code of Conduct might result in a student’s suspension or expulsion from the College. April 25, 2006, I gave the introduction for the keynote speaker speaker, Kevin Powell, at the African and Latino Heritage Achievement Banquet at Ramapo College of NJ. This is an annual event that congratulates the graduating seniors of African and Latino heritage at Ramapo College of NJ. This is a positive event that highlights success and accomplishment and sends a clear message to the other students to work hard and graduate with honors as well. This event is also crucial in helping us to meet our diversity mission, keeping our institutional commitment of being a world class institution. February 28, 2006, I gave the introduction for the guest speaker, Kevin Powell, at the African Ancestry Month ending ceremonial at Ramapo College of NJ. This is an annual event that highlights the successful end of black history programming, which is crucial in helping us to meet our diversity mission, keeping our institutional commitment of being a world class institution. February 6, 2006, I made a presentation titled “My Trip to West Africa: Cultural Observations of Ghana and Togo.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “The Culture Club” to do this lecture. I gave a PowerPoint presentation filled with my historical tour, photos, and cultural observations from my summer 2005 trip to Africa. The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum filled with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation February 1, 2006, I gave the introduction for the keynote speaker, Sister Souljah, at the African Ancestry Month Awards at Ramapo College of NJ. This is an annual event that highlights the beginning of black history programming, which is crucial in helping us to meet our diversity mission, keeping our institutional commitment of being a world class institution. October 26, 2005, I facilitated a film discussion on “Do the Right Thing” for Ramapo’s “Band Together for Diversity Week.” This week was crucial for getting Ramapo students and staff to participate in the Climate Survey on Campus. These actions were very important in helping us to meet our diversity mission at the college, keeping our institutional commitment of being a world class institution. 16
  17. 17. May 23, 2005, I represented Ramapo College at the Metro International 2005 Fulbright Awards Dinner at the United Nations in New York City. Honored for their contributions for world education and economic development were Mariam Assefa, Eve Burton, Rohit M Desai, and Steven C. Rockefeller, Jr. The Fulbright scholarships help to bring worthy international students to institutions, such as Ramapo College, and it helps us to keep or institutional commitment of being a world class institution. April 29, 2005, I organized an African-American Film Festival for Ramapo College’s School of Social Science & Human Services that explored the various genres of African American Film. Students and faculty were invited to a showing that also had a Q&A. The event was put on by my African Americans in Film class and sponsored by The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of. April 28, 2005, I was invited to participate in Ramapo College’s Teach In: What Kind of World Will Youth Inherit? What We Can Do to Improve it forum. I chaired the panel: “Teaching this Moment in History: Faculty Reflections & Pedagogies.” Students and faculty afterwards were encouraged to have a Q&A. The event was put on by Pat Keeton and other concerned educators at the college, and had a large amount of students involved April 15, 2005, I organized with Vice-Provost for Enrollment Management Peter Goetz a tour of Ramapo College for 29 African American and Hispanic, high school males interested in going to college. These highschoolers were from First Baptist Church of Somerset, New Jersey, and Piscataway High School. This was initiated by me to help with our college commitment to attract more males of color to our college. In recent years the amount of college bound males of color on our campus has been on a downward trend. Hopefully, with cooperation between administration and faculty we can turn this trend around. April 13, 2005, at Professor Mark Newell’s “Intro to American Studies” class, I was invited to give a presentation on W.E.B. Du Bois’s “Souls of Black Folk.” I gave a presentation and took questions from students who had an interest in learning about Du Bois’s seminal book. A fruitful intellectual exchange occurred that resulted in a better understanding of the historic problems of blacks and race relations. November 24, 2004, at Professor Jillian T. Weiss’s “Law in Society” class, I was invited to discuss my Journal of African American History article “Police-Black Community Relations in Postwar Philadelphia: Race & Criminalization in urban Social Spaces, 1945-1960.” I gave a presentation and took questions from students who have an interest in learning about the U.S. legal system. A fruitful intellectual exchange occurred that resulted in a better understanding of a historic problem of blacks and police relations. On November 11, 2004, The Ramapo News printed an article on my background by Michelle Paterek in the professor profile section titled “The Past Comes to Life in SSHS professor’s classroom.” The article gave a description of my journey to Ramapo College and the courses that I teach. I also praised the 17
  18. 18. college’s effort of doing a better job than other educational institutions in attracting a diverse student body. October 21, 2004, I made a presentation titled “The First Scramble for Africa, 300 AD to 1600 AD.” I was invited by The Ramapo College’s “BMAD” student organization to do this lecture. The audience consisted of a forum filled with students and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation. July 2004, Equal Opportunity Fund (EOF) motivational speaker. I was invited by the EOF administrators to speak to Ramapo College’s incoming freshmen, who are part of the successful EOF program, about adjustments to college life. The topics entailed our high expectations of the students being responsible and successful in their college endeavors while graduating with excellent grades. April 16, 2004, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s 3rd Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” This conference was historic because it featured and honored the 50th anniversary of guest speakers, the “Brown Sisters,” who participated in the groundbreaking 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Kansas Board of Education case that outlawed segregation. The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “African-American Intellectuals Against Mis-Education: Before and After Brown vs. the Topeka Board of Education” and it was warmly received by the audience. April 2, 2004, I gave a workshop at the 2nd Annual Ramapo’s African American and Latino Men Conference “A Gathering of Men.” The purpose of the conference was to focus on student development and to help increase the college’s retention rate of minority men, which historically has been a vulnerable population. Here I was able to apply what I learned from the retention workshops from the November 2002, “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. My workshop was titled “How to Work, have Fun, and Graduate with Respectable Grades in College.” I dealt with topics, such as 1) Surviving your Freshman Year Successfully; 2) Choosing the Right Major and Classes; 3) Dealing Positively with Professors and Administrators; 4) What to do if you do not have Money for Books 5) Balancing Work and a Social Life in College; and 6) Preparing to Graduate from College. November 17, 2003, I made a presentation titled “The African American and Caribbean Connection: From Slavery to Present.” I was invited by the Ramapo College’s “The Culture Club” to do this lecture. The audience at Friend’s Hall consisted of a forum filled with students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after my presentation April 30, 2003, I did a presentation on “Gullah (West African) Culture in the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia” for the Ramapo College Africana Institute lecture Series “African Spirituality and the Black Church.” The audience consisted of students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after the presentation and the showing of Julia Dash’s acclaimed “Daughters of the Dust.” 18
  19. 19. April 24, 2003, I organized an African-American Film Festival for Ramapo College’s School of Social Science & Human Services called “Exploring the 1970s Black Exploitation Films (Genre).” Students and faculty were invited to a showing that followed with a Q&A. The event was sponsored by The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of. April 17, 2003, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “The Mis-Education of the African American, Revisited,” and it was warmly received by the audience. April 4, 2003, I participated as a sponsor to Ramapo’s African American and Latino Men Conference “A Gathering of Men.” The purpose of the conference was to focus on student development and to help increase the college’s retention rate of minority men, which historically has been a vulnerable population. Here I was able to apply what I learned from the retention workshops from the November 2002, “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. February 25, 2003, I organized and hosted the first annual “Africana Studies Program: Open House” as an event that allowed students to learn more about the program and the dedicated professors who teach the courses. The topics discussed where “How Can the African Studies Program enhance your Career Goals” and a Q & A session followed. In addition, refreshments were served. October 1, 2002, at The History Club at Ramapo College I gave a paper & presentation titled, “The Impact of World War II and the Early Cold War on African Americans and Civil Rights, 1941-1954.” The Event was held at the Ramapo Student Center. The Moderators were Dr. Henry Vance Davis and Dr. Paul Elovitz Important Campus Committees and Projects September 2016, member of expert panel on the summer reading by Claudia Rankine Citizen: An American Lyric. It is a book of poetry focused on race in America, particularly the everyday experiences of racism. I am working on setting up a series of events in the fall related to this book. December 2015. Helping with new initiatives we have planned for Ramapo College next year are the two new mentoring programs, Sister Connections and Brothers Connecting. Students of color will be matched with Faculty and Staff of Color through the new mentoring program. The mission of Sister Connections and Brothers Connecting is to provide an environment where students of color can create community, recognize differences, and celebrate diversity. Equity & Diversity Programs envisions Sister Connections and Brothers Connecting will enhance the academic, emotional, social, and physical lives of 19
  20. 20. students of color by providing them with resources, support services, and network opportunities that will enhance their lives. September 2011, I was appointed Professor and mentor for the pilot Living- Learning Community program. Summer 2009, Appointed Lead member of College group for School of Social Science and Human Services to make Africana Studies a Major at the College, which ended up as a success. When I arrived at Ramapo for 30 years others tried unsuccessfully to accomplish this feat. February 2008, Appointed to the Middles States Re-Accreditation Steering Committee by President Mercer. This selective membership is an all-college membership charged with helping to put together a self-study document and welcome committee to ensure that Ramapo College is Re-accredited as an viable educational Institution again. This time we are charged to do a comprehensive self assessment, which requires many hours of labor outside of classroom teaching and scholarship. However, it is rewarding in that the end result with be a guide for the College to continue to grow and become the world class institution, which is congruent with th mission of the college 2007/ 2008, Appointed as pilot faculty member to produce revenue producing winter online courses at Ramapo College September 2007, Appointed to the 2nd & 3rd Year Promotion Committee of SSHS. September 2006, I accepted a nomination to join the Ramapo College Judicial Board. My experience and campus involvement would be utilized as an asset to the College Judicial Review Board. This is a volunteer experience comprised of Ramapo College faculty, staff, and students. The Board functions as part of the Code of Conduct and is based upon the application of policy, procedure, and impartial due process. The Board is responsible for hearing a case when an alleged violation of the Code of Conduct might result in a student’s suspension or expulsion from the College. March 16, 2006, I accepted an invitation to join the Educational Opportunity Fund Board/Committee at Ramapo College of NJ. This Committee brings together concerned community leaders, parents, businessmen, faculty, and staff to ensure that EOF is accomplishing its mission of educating students who came from our most disadvantaged districts in the state. I am currently working on a subcommittee to help with male student recruitment and retention. February 19, 2006, I accepted an invitation to join the Diversity Action Committee at Ramapo College of NJ. This Committee was created by the Office of the President in 2004 to work on improving the climate of tolerance at Ramapo College. Its initial mission is for 1) Campus atmosphere and equity, 2) Student recruitment and retention, and 3) Faculty/staff recruitment and retention. A professional climate survey was given and specific actions would be 20
  21. 21. drawn up to further this goal. An application has to be submitted to join this committee and you must receive an affirmative vote and an invitation to join it. Fall 2004, I was appointed assistant advisor to the School of Social Science Student (SSHS) Committee by Dean Henry Vance Davis. The SSHS Student Committee is a volunteer student-ran committee that acts as a liaison between Professors and Students. This student committee addresses issues from the student point of view on how to make their experience in SSHS an effective and rewarding one. They organize student/professor chat and informational sessions, recruitment and informational tables for freshman decision days, and do charitable activities for the good of the College. November 2004, Ramapo College officially recognized the Native African Students Organization (NASO). As its first student advisor, NASO will address on campus the lack of knowledge about the continent that spawned humanity. Moreover, NASO fits well with the mission of the college to bring students an understanding of all world cultures in order to make them better citizens of the world. NASO is also needed to help the growing “African” born population and first generation Africans who are now entering our American colleges. Thus it will be beneficial to have a place where they can network and discuss common experiences that will help them to succeed in their adopted nation. The difference is that this population and their parents chose to come to our nation, unlike Africans in our past, which makes their perspective different and unique. October 2004, as a member of the African American Studies course development committee, I developed a permanent course for the Ramapo’s Africana Studies Program and the General Education Program called “Introduction to African Studies.” This 200 level course introduces students to the pre-colonial cultures and civilizations in sub-Saharan Africa from medieval times to the African Diaspora to the Americas and Middle East. Most importantly, it supports Ramapo College’s mission of cultural and intentional understanding. February 2004, every year in February I work on the African Ancestry Month committee at Ramapo, which provides numerous events for all students during “Black History Month.” The list of programs and their support from me are too long to list. However, I am very proud of hosting our annual African American Studies Program Open House for the students and public held towards the end of every February. The main topic discussed is “How can the African Studies Program enhance your career goals?” This open house is a continuation of my efforts and that of my colleagues to meet our students’ needs. October 2003, appointed member of the Ramapo College library search committee to find and hire a person for the newly created position of Technical Services and Archives Librarian. This entailed setting up a professional way to interview candidates who are qualified for the position and recommending to the Dean of the Library, a candidate that should be hired. September 2003, member of the Study Abroad Committee to form a program with West African Nations. The purpose of our committee is to create a travel abroad program that will allow the university to have a Ramapo College student 21
  22. 22. and teacher exchange with some of the West African nations, such as Ghana, Senegal, and Liberia. Our Study Abroad programs count as a course and credits for our students because of the immense learning opportunities. May 2003, I became a member of the African American Studies course development committee. I developed a permanent course for the African American Studies Program and the American Studies Program called the “United States Relations toward Africa and its Diaspora.” This 300 level course introduces students to the history of U.S. foreign relations toward nations and entities in sub-Saharan Africa and its Diaspora—the Caribbean and Latin America. I also worked with colleagues to develop a course titled “Introduction to African Studies.” This course will introduce students to the pre-colonial cultures and civilizations in sub-Saharan Africa from medieval times to the 19th century. D. Contribution to Community September 2009-2016- Developed along with our Diversity Action Committee over the years an organized plan to bring minority High School students to Ramapo College to host them from various major cities and large towns surrounding Ramapo. This has resulted over the years of making communities of color more knowledgeable about Ramapo and has resulted of some students deciding to attend Ramapo College to help to meet our Mission of Diversity. The high schools over the years that we brought or sometimes visited with our own resources have been located in Newark, Paterson, Hackensack all major area of color we can recruit from. September 23, 2011, I participated in a community panel forum titled the State of the Black Family Summit at the Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Englewood, New Jersey. The event was held for both Adult and Youth Services. I discussed the consequences of the high rate of joblessness on the current black family and some practical solutions that could be used for relief. It resulted in an intellectually stimulating debate about how to motivate the community, and this event was attended by around 50 or more members of the church and community. February 21, 2010, I participated in a community Black History forum at The Madison Avenue Christian Reformed Church in Paterson, New Jersey. The event was held for both Adult and Youth Services. I gave a presentation titled, “African History and the Bible” in the community. It resulted in an intellectually stimulating debate about how to motivate youth in the community. This event was attended by around 50 or more members of the church. February 2009, I participated in a community Black History presentation in my hometown of Paterson, New Jersey with Operation Link-up Inc. The event was held at the Youth Services Bureau at 60 Temple Street on “Black History Awareness.” It resulted in an intellectually stimulating debate about how to involve youth in the community. This event was attended by around 20 teenagers of Paterson’s Operation Link-up organization 22
  23. 23. March 2008, Moderator and presenter for the African a Film festival, Schomburg Scholarship celebration. February 2008, Moderator for welcoming visiting Schomburg Scholar Professor of Political Science and International Relations at Addis Ababa University, Dr. Kissahun Berhanu from Ethiopia who shared his expertise on Africa with the entire Ramapo College Community for the week. Most importantly, Dr. Berhanu was here to launch an international discussion about the relationship between Africa and the rest of the world that will culminate at our Spring 2009, Seventh Biennial State of the Africana Professoriate Conference. Dr. Kassahun Berhanu gave (3) lectures on the following topics that helped to fulfill our Ramapo students’ 5 hour experiential component. Monday, Feb. 25/08, “Conflict Over Resources and Prospects for Durable Peace: Experiences from Ethiopia and the Sudan”; Tuesday, Feb. 26/08, “Constitutional Engineering and Elections as Sources of Legitimacy in Post-Cold War Africa”; and Thursday, Feb. 28/08 “The Ramifications of Decentralized Governance in Contemporary Africa.” March 29, 2007, Chair of the 6th Annual State of the Africana Professoriate Conference, “The Black Familial Structure.” This open to the public conference was very timely in light of recent films, such as "The Pursuit of Happiness" and "Daddy's Little Girls" that depict alternative black familial structures. Melvin Van Peebles was the special guest speaker on March 29th, and we built on the previous success of our State of the Africana Professoriate Conference. Thus far this has been a great conference in allowing, new and creative scholarship. February 25, 2006, I participated in a community Black History forum in my hometown of Paterson, New Jersey with NuFamily Foundation Inc. The event was held at the Youth Services Bureau at 60 Temple Street and titled, “Black History…The Shoulders We Stand On: Reflections and Preparations for Our Future. This was part of the Relationship Forum Series, VII, and was open to all “grown folks” in the community. It resulted in an intellectually stimulating debate about how to motivate youth in the community. This event was attended by around 25 of Paterson’s concerned citizens. May 27, 2005, I joined a community based organization called “Operation Link-Up” that operates in the Passaic County public high school system. It provides mentors to motivated urban at-risk youth in order to help guide them to achieving their higher educational goals. This organization was created a decade ago by the honorable Mr. Carey Jenkins and has a proven track record of getting students to college and helping them to graduate with college degrees. Our own institution has benefited by receiving and graduating its students. A few of our other Ramapo employees are also members of this organization. April 15, 2005, for my Somerset County community I organized a tour of Ramapo College for 29 African American and Hispanic, high school males interested in going to college. These highschoolers were from First Baptist Church of Somerset, New Jersey, and Piscataway High School. This was initiated by me to help with our college commitment to attract more males of color to our college. In recent years the amount of college bound males of color 23
  24. 24. on our campus has been on a downward trend. Hopefully, with cooperation between administration and faculty we can turn this trend around. January 22, 2005, I gave a presentation at the “History Consortium at the Hermitage: Teaching American History Seminar” titled “African Americans and the Civil War.” I was invited to participate in this “Federal Grant” project by Professor Emeritus Henry Bischoff and Professor Richard Langheim to mentor Bergen County middle and high school teachers to improve the quality of history taught in our public schools. This two-day seminar resulted in increasing the historical literacy of primary school teachers in Bergen County, while demonstrating Ramapo College’s commitment to reaching out to the community November 12-13, 2004, I gave a presentation at the “History Consortium at the Hermitage: Teaching American History Seminar” titled “African Americans in Colonial New Jersey and New York.” I was invited to participate in this federal grant project by Professor Emeritus Henry Bischoff and Professor Richard Langheim to mentor Bergen County schoolteachers to improve the quality of history taught in our primary schools. This two-day seminar resulted in increasing the historical literacy of primary school teachers in Bergen County, while demonstrating Ramapo College’s commitment to reaching out to the community. April 16, 2004, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s 3rd Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” This conference was historic because it featured and honored the 50th anniversary of guest speakers, the “Brown Sisters,” who participated in the groundbreaking 1954 Brown vs. Topeka Kansas Board of Education case that outlawed segregation. The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “African-American Intellectuals Against Mis-Education: Before and After Brown vs. the Topeka Board of Education” and it was warmly received by the audience. March 26, 2004, I gave a presentation at the “Why Study Black Studies: The Status of the Discipline in the State of NJ” titled “Core Areas of Knowledge in the Discipline: What are your teaching Imperatives?” I was invited to participate in this statewide conference by members of the African American Program at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey where it was held. April 30, 2003, I did a presentation on “Gullah (West African) Culture in the Sea Islands of South Carolina and Georgia” for the Ramapo College Africana Institute lecture Series “African Spirituality and the Black Church.” The audience consisted of students, faculty, and visitors where a fruitful intellectual exchange occurred after the presentation and the showing of Julia Dash’s acclaimed “Daughters of the Dust.” April 17, 2003, I attended and presented a paper at Ramapo’s Annual “The State of the African American Professoriate.” The Africana Institute, in which I am a member of, sponsored the event. My paper was titled, “The Mis-Education of the African American, Revisited,” and it was warmly received by the audience. 24
  25. 25. April 12, 2003, I presented a paper at Columbia University in the Africana Studies Against Criminal Injustice Conference. The topic of my paper was “The Rise of the Modern Day Criminalization of African-American Philadelphia, 1945-2000.” The event was held at Columbia University’s School of International Affairs in New York City and attracted an audience and scholars from around the world. E. Grants SSHGS Grant to attend June 1-4, 2016 in Africa- Dakar, Senegal, I participated in workshop development at a joint conference of the American Anthropological Association and African Studies Association and hosted by Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa ((CODESRIA) and the West African Research Center (WARC). Titled : "Innovation, Transformation and Sustainable Futures in Africa. This event, took place at the Novotel Dakar Hotel. October 2011, I was awarded a Foundation Board of Governors grant from the Ramapo College for the project “ Association for the Study of Worldwide African Diaspora Conference” for the participation of 2 Africana Convening group member in a conference at the University of Pittsburgh. This trip helped our Convening in bringing practical knowledge to Ramapo College students about Africa and the African Diaspora. We just began our Africana Studies Major at Ramapo with well attended courses, such as “African American History,” “Introduction to African Studies,” and “Contemporary Africa” 2008/2009, Ramapo Teaching, Learning & Technology Grant to help in supporting and producing revenue producing online courses for Ramapo College of NJ. The title of the grant was “Ramapo Online Courses Support Materials. October 2007, I was awarded a Foundation Board of Governors grant from the Ramapo College for the project “ Association for the Study of Worldwide African Diaspora Conference” for the participation of 4 African American Studies Convening group member in a conference at the University of Barbados. This trip helped our Convening in bringing practical knowledge to Ramapo College students about Africa and the African Diaspora. Currently I am the only Tenured Africanists teaching at Ramapo with well attended courses, such as “African American History,” “Introduction to African Studies,” and “U.S. Relations Toward Africa and its Diaspora.” September 2005, I was awarded a travel request grant from the Ramapo College Foundation to help cover my expenses incurred during my historical tour of Ghana and Togo, West Africa in August 2005. Funding was also granted by the Office of the Provost special fund, and the School of Social Science travel fund. This trip helped me in bringing practical knowledge to Ramapo College students about Africa. I am now currently the only full-time Africanists teaching at Ramapo with well attended courses, such as “African American History,” 25
  26. 26. “Introduction to African Studies,” and “U.S. Relations Toward Africa and its Diaspora.” February 2003, I was awarded a Ford Foundation grant to travel to the National Association of African American Studies Conference (NAAAS) held in Houston, Texas. There I presented my paper titled “Does Carter G. Woodson’s ‘The Mis- Education of the Negro’ Still Apply Today?” I also represented Ramapo College as a referee at the conference. F. Special Recognition/Awards/Memberships September 2011, I was appointed Professor and mentor for the pilot Living- Learning Community program. Students who participate in the LLC will engage in an academic and residential community with other students who have similar academic, cultural and social interests. Enhancing learning experiences and community engagement in the first year, students will develop ongoing and lasting relationships with classmates, faculty and staff. The LLC is an opportunity for students to explore different majors and connect majors to career choices. See http://www.ramapo.edu/academics/llc/ for specific details and requirements on LLC. April 12, 2007, I was presented the Ebony Women For Social Change award in honor of my continuous support and dedication to the Black Student Union at Ramapo College 2006-2007. This award was given out at the Ebony Women’s banquet hosted specifically to award men of color who have supported students in their educational and life goals, going beyond class room study. June 2006, I was chosen to become a referee and reviewer for the prestigious, peer reviewed journal “The Journal of Urban History,” edited by David Goldfield from the Department of History at The University of North Carolina at Charlotte. My expertise on African American over incarceration, social control, and police-relations in post World War II Urban History was needed. May 12, 2006, I was inducted and made an Honorary Member of Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership society that encourages superior scholarship, leadership, and exemplary character, for recognition of my dedication and commitment to the campus community at Ramapo College. This award is voted on by the Omicron Delta Members, which is comprised of Junior and Senior students in the top of their class. February 26, 2006, I was presented the Men’s Appreciation Award in honor of my continuous support and dedication to the Black Student Union at Ramapo College 2005-2006. This award was given out at the Ebony Women’s banquet hosted specifically to award men of color who have supported students in their educational and life goals, going beyond class room study. February 19, 2006, I accepted an invitation to join the Diversity Action Committee at Ramapo College of NJ. This Committee was created by the Office of the President in 2004 to work on improving the climate of tolerance at 26
  27. 27. Ramapo College. Its initial mission is for 1) Campus atmosphere and equity, 2) Student recruitment and retention, and 3) Faculty/staff recruitment and retention. A professional climate survey was given and specific actions would be drawn up to further this goal. An application has to be submitted to join this committee and you must receive an affirmative vote and an invitation to join it. Spring 2006, I became part of the active Membership in The Southern Conference on African American Studies. Inc., (SCAASI). This prestigious black history organization that was founded in 1979 and holds conventions in the former Confederate States. It purposely tries to reach out and hold parts of each convention at a historically black college (HBCU), and key focus is to reach out to students and young scholars as well. April 22, 2005, I was presented the Office of Student Activities Award for recognition of my dedication and commitment to the African community at Ramapo College 2004-05. This award is voted on by the students and given out annually to educators who properly advise students how to achieve their life goals, going beyond class room study. 2005, I became part of the active Membership of the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD). This is a prestigious organization founded to study the history of the African Diaspora, and has in its membership great scholars in the field, such as Michael A. Gomez. Every year the hold the conference in a nation that has been impacted by an African Diaspora population. Fall 2005, I encouraged the African American Studies Convening Group at Ramapo College to become a member of the National Council for Black Studies, Inc. (NCBS). This important organization provides support and resources for Africana Studies Departments around the nation and world. It holds an annual conference for scholars to present new ideas and concepts, and also publishes a journal called the “International Journal of Africana Studies” regularly. May 2004, I was chosen to become Co-Editor of The Cultural Journal that is published by the Culture Club at Ramapo College of NJ. The journal is published 4 times a year and it is devoted to sharing experiences with an emphasis on culture. Contributions of prose and poetry are accepted. Literary criticism, short stories, poems, essays, anecdotes, drawings, and recipes concerning your culture, perceptions, and interaction with people from different countries are welcome. Submissions are accepted in any language provided they are accompanied by an English translation. March 2004, I was chosen to become a referee for the peer reviewed journal “Pennsylvania History,” edited by Brian C. Black from the Department of History at Penn State University. My expertise on African American social and political movements in post World War II Philadelphia was needed for their upcoming special edition on Pennsylvania Urban History. February 2003, I was awarded a Ford Foundation grant to travel to the National Association of African American Studies Conference (NAAAS) held in Houston, Texas. There I presented my paper titled “Does Carter G. Woodson’s ‘The Mis- 27
  28. 28. Education of the Negro’ Still Apply Today?” I also represented Ramapo College as a referee at the conference. 2002-2003, I became part of the active Membership in The Association for the Study of African American Life and History. This is the oldest and most prestigious black history organization that was founded in 1914 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson. 1999, College of Liberal Arts, Distinguished Teaching Award, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA. 1998, 2000, Future Faculty Fellowship Award, Temple University. 1997, 1999, Teacher Assistant of American History Award, Temple University. 1986-87, Rutgers Governing Association, Most Consistent Writer’s Award, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ. G. Other supporting/Miscellaneous Materials or Information May 2006, Technological Training at Ramapo College on over new WebCT course management system—Quiz and Assignments Workshop. I also trained at a workshop on basic Website Design. An expert from the New Jersey Institute of Technology was brought in for hands on training. The training was developed by Director of Technology Education, Valerie Scott Massimo and Microcomputer Developer Raymond Fallon Foreign Travel Experience: Ethiopia 2008, Ghana, West Africa 2005; Togo, West Africa 2005: I traveled to a number of Caribbean nations, which was personally funded. April 2004, Student Advisement Training was given to me by the head of the Ramapo College’s Advisement Center, Jaclyn Skrzynski. This training entailed learning the college’s core courses and general education courses, as well as the curriculum of the various different schools in the college. I was also given advice on how do deal with common student problems and questions, and given the training on what to look for in a student’s audit (transcript) to make sure they have the appropriate requirements to graduate. November 2003, I attended the WebCT new version training given by Phyllis Pickens on how to utilize Ramapo Colleges’ updated course management system in the class room. It gives students online access to syllabus assignments and readings, discussion boards, chat rooms, relevant websites, video feeds, and calendar organizers. This led me to put most of my courses on the WebCT. September 2003, I attended the “Association for the Study of African-American Life” annual conference in Milwaukee, WI. I attended a workshop called “The Scholarship of Diaspora Foodways.” This exposed me to the most current work on how African cuisine has influenced American foods through African Americans and culture. This information could be utilized in the courses that I teach at Ramapo College and the College of NJ. 28
  29. 29. March 2003, I attended Phil McLewin’s Ramapo’s Faculty Resource Center’s “Plagiarism Workshop” that was facilitated by Patricia Ard. It helped me in developing anti-plagiarism strategies for the classroom and gave me a chance to network with more experienced professors on this matter. February 2003, at the National Association of African American Studies Conference (NAAAS) held in Houston, Texas, I attended a seminar on “How to Prepare Yourself for Tenure.” It covered the amount of hard work and the importance of documentation in trying to make a case for being a tenured member of the profession. January 2003, WebCT Training was given by Phyllis Pickens on how to utilize Ramapo College’s course management system in the class room. This lead directly to me putting the 300 level history Course “The Black Power Years” on the WebCt system and putting the 300 level course “the Age of Segregation” on the WebCt for fall 2003 Fall 2002 & Spring 2003, Ramapo Faculty Teaching Seminars training for new faculty. These workshops were organized by Martha Eckard to learn about the college and its resources for students and faculty. Some seminars taught were how to use the grading system, library system, and Provost Ed Cody’s presentation on have to make an effective reappointment package. November 6, 2002, I attended the “People of Color in Predominately White Institutions Conference” in Lincoln, Nebraska. It provided numerous conferences on training on various issues that can improve the retention of students and employees of color within these institutions. October 2002, I attended the “Association for the Study of African-American Life” annual conference in Orlando Florida. I attended workshops and was exposed to the most current work in the field so that it could be utilized in the courses that I teach at Ramapo College and the College of NJ. In addition, it allowed me to network with publishers. 1998-2001, I attended the annual “Teaching Matters: A Conference on Teaching” at Temple University. I took teaching workshops such as “Technology in the Classroom,” “Teaching Students with Disabilities,” “Classroom Decorum: How to get it and Keep it,” “The Dynamics of Race and Class in the Classroom,” “Active Teaching,” “Writing in the Student-Centered Classroom,” and “Best Practices: Strategies for more Effective Teaching.” 29
  30. 30. Please use the first (4 ) references; recommendations given upon request Outside References to contact: for Dr. Karl Ellis Johnson Dr. V.P. Franklin (now at University of California) Riverside Teachers College (Editor-in-Chief The Journal of (Negro) African American History Columbia University Box 75, 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027 W (951) 827-1976 W(212) 678-8103 Email: vpf1019@aol.com; or jaah@jaah.org Dr. Henry Vance Davis Historian, Medgar Evers College (CUNY), Brooklyn Founding University Dean for Recruitment and Diversity 1650 Bedford Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11225 Cell (862) 268-3511 Email henryvdavis@aol.com Honorable, Michael A. Shipp , Esq. U.S. Federal Judge (NJ District) 16 Whitehouse Way Monroe, New Jersey 08831 Cell (732) 539-1718 Dr. Kenneth L. Kusmer (Temple University) . 47 Bryn Mawr Ave Lansdowne, PA 19050 C (610) 213-8799 E-Mail: kkusmer@temple.edu Or kkusmer@yahoo.com Former Principal Donnie Johnson of Main Street School, in E. Orange, NJ 1502 Stuyvesant Avenue Trenton, NJ 08618 C (609) 218-9808 Dr. Clement A. Price (Rutgers University) (Deceased) 55 Lincoln Parkway Newark, NJ 07102 H (973) 624-8422 W (973) 353-5414 E-Mail: caprice@andromeda.rutgers.edu 30
  31. 31. Dr. Joe William Trotter, Jr. Carnegie Mellon University Dept. of History, 240 Baker Hall Pittsburgh, Pa 15213-3890 W (412) 268-2875 E-Mail: trotter@andrew.cmu.edu Dr. Gloria Harper Dickinson (Former Pres. ASALH) Deceased The College of New Jersey (Director) African-American Studies Dept. PO Box 7718 Ewing, New Jersey 08628-0718 W (609) 771-2716 E-mail: dickinsg@TCNJ.EDU Professor Emeritus Sam Pinn –Ramapo College 283 McDonough Avenue Brooklyn, New York 11213 (347) 564-7548 Dr. Vernon C. Walton, Senior Pastor (Ramapo College (former) Board of Trustee President)First Baptist Church of Vienna 450 Orchard Street, NW Vienna, VA 22180 Email: vwalton@fbcv.org 31
  32. 32. 32

×