Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Energy from Waste Water Sewage Sludge in Lebanon - Ecorient 2013

Energy from Waste Water Sewage Sludge in Lebanon

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to comment

Energy from Waste Water Sewage Sludge in Lebanon - Ecorient 2013

  1. 1. Energy from Wastewater Sewage Sludge in Lebanon Transforming a Waste Disposal Problem into an Opportunity Ecorient – June 2013 Council for Development & Reconstruction
  2. 2. Table of contents ‐ Objectives of the Study, Slide 4 ‐ Anaerobic Digestion & CHP Technology Review, Slides 5 to 12 ‐ AD General Guidelines for Future WWTP, Slide 13 ‐ Project 1 to Project 7 Definition, Slides 14 & 15 ‐ Scenario 1: AD from WWTP proper Sludge only, Slide 16 ‐ Scenario 2: AD with Added Sludge, Slide 17 ‐ Scenario 3: AD with Added Sludge & Co‐Substrates, Slide 18 ‐ AD Economics, Slide 19 ‐ Summary of Findings, Slide 20 ‐ Challenges & Recommendations, Slide 21 ‐ Conclusion, Slide 22
  3. 3. Objectives of the Study • Issue Anaerobic Digestion ‐ AD technology  general guidelines for future WWTP projects in  Lebanon  • Evaluate Energy potential at 7 identified WWTP  sites where sludge AD is feasible • Evaluate options to maximize Energy production: a‐ Sludge imported from WWTP within 25 Km b‐ Co‐digestion using local substrates     identified in the area during the National  Bioenergy National Plan
  4. 4. Anaerobic Digestion Technology: Principle & Requirements • Anaerobic digestion is a process in which organic matter from wet  organic wastes (ie. Waste water sludge, liquid & solid manure, food  processing wastes, slaughterhouse residues, agriculture residues etc.)  is converted into Biogas by bacteria in the absence of oxygen.  • The Biogas including 60% Methane (CH4) is then collected and may be  used to generate Electricity & Heat (1 Nm3 Biogas  0.6 liters LFO). • Biogas reduces emissions by preventing methane release in the  atmosphere. Methane is 21 times stronger than carbon dioxide as a  greenhouse gas. • In addition, the AD process creates potentially valuable by‐products,  such as High Ammonia content fertilizer from hygenized sludge, and/or  liquid with available nutrients. • Finally the AD process has the advantage of Odor Control & Sludge  volume reduction to (1/3).
  5. 5. Sludge Anaerobic Digestion Operational Parameters 1 Ton Organic Matter Destroyed  From 20 Nm3 to 900 Nm3 of Biogas  depending on feedstock & AD design  +  Valuable Fertilizer
  6. 6. How an Anaerobic Digester Works ? 5 – 20 Days, Temperature Dependent
  7. 7. What an Anaerobic Digester looks like ?   Substrate  Inflow Effluent  Substrate Effluent  Gas Ground  injection  pipe Ground  sludge pipe Fluid Zone Sludge Zone Mixing Zone Biogas
  8. 8. Basic Anaerobic Digestion System Flow Diagram
  9. 9. Basic Combined Heat & Power Biogas Engine Gen‐set Diagram Hot Return Water Cold Supply Water Pump Exhaust Stack CO2 Recovery Secondary  Exhaust  Heat  Exchanger Selective  Catalytic  Reduction  Exhaust after  Treatment Exhaust Silencer  Heat Exchanger Biogas Genset with Heat  Recovery Exhaust  Oxidation  Catalyst Electric Utility Exhaust  Line Electric Output Switchgear Biogas  Supply Jacket Water & After‐ cooler Heat Exchangers
  10. 10. 100 MWh/Year Primary Energy : Valorization Methods Comparison Biogas Combined Heat & Power  CHP Gas Engines Gen‐Set 39 MWh/Year Electrical Energy  +  41 MWh/Year Heat Energy = 80 MWh/Year Total Energy Gas Engines Gen‐Set     (Electricity Only) 39 MWh/Year Electrical Energy (Heat Energy is Wasted) Boiler                            (Heat Only) 85 MWh/Year of Heat Energy
  11. 11. Scale Requirements for Anaerobic Digestion Feedstock  (Tons / Year ) to  produce 1 MWe 25,000 to 60,000  (depending on  feedstock)
  12. 12. AD Technology General Guidelines for Future WWTP Projects
  13. 13. Medium to Large WWTP Projects in Lebanon 86% 7% 7% WWTP Distribution by Size Less than 100,000 PE Between 100,000 PE & 200,000 PE Greater than 200,000 PE Name PE 100,000 to  200,000 PE 1 Nabatieh 100,000 2 Tibnine & Chakra 100,000 3 P7 ‐ Baalbek 100,000 4 West Beqaa (Jib  Jenine + Saghbine) 100,000 5 Timnine El Tahta 100,000 6 Zahle 150,000 7 P3 ‐ Aabde 185,000 > 200,000 PE 1 P2 ‐ Tyr 250,000 2 P6 ‐ Majdal Aanjar 300,000 3 P4 ‐ Sarafand 325,000 4 P5 ‐ Saida 390,000 5 Kessrwan 505,000 6 Ghadir 800,000 7 P1‐ Tripoli 1,000,000 8 Bourj Hammoud 2,000,000
  14. 14. 7 Identified AD Feasible WWTP WWTP PE Co-Substrates MW P1 Tripoli 1,000,000 N.A. 3.1 MW Jbeil 50,000 N.A. Batroun 30,000 N.A. Chekka 24,000 N.A. P2 Tyr 250,000 N.A. 0.9 MW Tibnine & Chakra 100,000 N.A. P3 Aabde 185,000 Wheat Residues 1.4 MWBakhoun 48,000 Animal Manure Mechmech 68,000 Food Industry Waste P4 Sarafand 325,000 Wheat Residue 1.5 MWNabatieh 100,000 Yellow Grease Kfarsir, Yahmour & Zawtar 35,000 Animal Manure Food Industry Waste P5 Saida 390,000 Slaughterhouse Waste 1.7 MW Ras Nabi Younes 88,000 Wheat Residues Olive cake Residues P6 Majdal Aanjar 300,000 Wheat Residues 1.7 MW Zahle 150,000 Animal Manure Slaughterhouse Waste Food Industry Waste P7 Baalbeck 100,000 Milk Processing Co-products 1.4 MWTimnine El Tahta 100,000 Wheat Residues Laboua 47,000 Animal Manure Food Industry Waste
  15. 15. Scenario 1: AD from WWTP proper Sludge Only 21,917 5,579 4,129 7,253 8,703 6,695 0 54,276 23,041 5,865 4,340 7,625 9,150 7,038 0 57,059 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 MWh/Year Energy Production through CHP Energy Production through CHP: Heat MWh/year Energy Production through CHP: Electriciity MWh/year 7.32 MW 75 % % Self Generated Electricity 75 % 75 % 75 % 75 % 75 % 0 % ‐ 8,300 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 2,100 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 1,500 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 2,800 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 3,300 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 2,500 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 20,500 T  CO2e/Year
  16. 16. Scenario 2: AD with Added Sludge from nearby WWTP  23,968 7,217 6,029 8,940 10,772 8,333 3,964 69,22325,197 7,587 6,338 9,399 11,325 8,760 4,168 72,774 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 MWh/Year Energy Production through CHP Energy Production through CHP : Heat MWh/year Energy Production through CHP : Electriciity MWh/year 8.88 MW + 9.4 % + 29.4 % + 46.0 % + 23.3 % + 23.8 % + 24.5 % + 27.5 % + 0.0 % + 22.5 % + 42.1 % + 25.6 % + 21.0 % + 22.5 % + 21.4 % % Increase in Installed  Capacity % Increase in Energy  Production 83 % 100 % 112 % 95 % 95 % 96 % % Self Generated Electricity ‐ 9,000 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 2,700 T  CO2e/Year ‐2,200 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 3,300 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 4,000 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 3,100 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 25,700 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 1,400 T  CO2e/Year
  17. 17. Scenario 3: AD with Added Sludge & Co‐Substrates  23,968 7,217 11,011 11,921 13,611 13,560 11,395 92,683 25,197 7,587 11,576 12,534 14,309 14,255 11,979 97,437 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000 200,000 MWh/Year Energy Production through CHP Energy Production through CHP Heat MWh/year Energy Production through CHP Electriciity MWh/year + 9.4 % % Increase in Installed  Capacity % Increase in Energy  Production + 29.4 % + 166.7 % + 64.4 % + 56.4 % + 102.5 % + 187.5 % + 70.8 % % Self Generated Electricity + 0.0 % 11.68 MW + 22.5 % + 89.8 % + 60.8 % + 53.3 % + 90.0 % + 189.4 % + 59.5 % 83 % 100 % 205 % 126 % 120 % 156 % ‐ 9,000 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 2,700 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 4,180 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 4,500 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 5,160 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 5,160 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 4,300 T  CO2e/Year ‐ 35,000 T  CO2e/Year
  18. 18. AD Economics 19.70 16.10 15.60 16.20 7.708.70 10.60 10.70 9.00 7.10 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25.00 P3‐ Aabde P4‐ Sarafand P5‐ Saida P6‐ Majdal Anjar P7‐ Bekaa Levelized Cost of Electrical Energy in $c/Kwh $c/Kwh Scenario 2 $c/Kwh Scenario 3 Current Cost of Energy Production by EDL Target Cost of Energy Production by EDL Current EDL Tariff
  19. 19. Scenario 1:  Sludge AD Only (6 Plants) Scenario 2 :            Sludge AD with Added Sludge (7 + 14 plants) Scenario 3:              Sludge AD with Added  Sludge & Co‐Digestion ( 7 + 14 plants) Already Installed Generation  Capacity (Tripoli) 3.09 MW 3.09 MW 3.09 MW Additional Generation  Capacity 4.23 MW 5.79 MW 8.59 MW Total Generation  Capacity 7.32 MW 8.88 MW 11.68 MW Electric Energy 54,276 MWh/y 69,223 MWh/y 92,683 MWh/y Heat Energy 57,059 MWh/y 72,774 MWh/y 97,437 MWh/y CO2 Reduction ‐ 20,500 T CO2e/y ‐ 25,700 T CO2e/y ‐35,000 T CO2e/y Self Generation 75% 83% to 112% 83% to 205% Levelized Cost of  Electricity* N.A. 7.7 to 19.7 c/Kwh 7.1 to 10.7 c/Kwh * The heat & the fertilizers that are produced are an added benefit that has not been priced + 21.4 % + 59.5 % + 27.5 % + 70.8 % + 25.4 % +70.8% Scenario 3 represents 3% to 4% of Lebanon’s Bioenergy Potential Findings Summary
  20. 20. Challenges & Recommendations • The future WWTP design must follow the general guidelines. • WWTP belonging to different Water Establishments must be able to  divert sludge from one plant to another under Scenario 2. • The Water Establishments to which the WWTP belong must have the  legal & administrative possibility to enter into agreements with third  parties for acquiring the Co‐Substrates feedstock under Scenario 3. • The WWTP that generate more then their Electrical Energy  consumption must be enabled to evacuate the excess energy on the  grid (ie: elaborate a customized Net Metering scheme). • The Levelized cost of Energy Produced under Scenario 2 being higher  than the target level of 14 c/Kwh , incentives will be required to  proceed or we must stick to Scenario 3. • The WWTP must have the legal & administrative possibility to sell the  Heat Energy produced & the Fertilizers to neighboring end users. • The AD technology requires a thorough technical monitoring in order to  be effective. The Water Establishments must be allowed to collect  money from the end users for the WWT service in order to finance the  proper Operation & Maintenance of these plants.
  21. 21. Conclusion • There is a valuable opportunity to do the following in one stroke: ‐ Produce Renewable Energy ‐ Recycle Waste into Fertilizers ‐ Reduce Emissions ‐ Reduce Fuel consumption ‐ Solve a Waste Disposal Problem ‐ Save Money ‐ Preserve our Environment What are we waiting for ?

    Be the first to comment

    Login to see the comments

  • SashidharReddy7

    Dec. 10, 2016
  • WjndyLee

    May. 29, 2018
  • nikolastros

    Feb. 7, 2021

Energy from Waste Water Sewage Sludge in Lebanon

Views

Total views

1,287

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

2

Actions

Downloads

82

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

3

×