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The Improvement Professional's Evolving Role: From Practitioner to Facilitator to Coach

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Recorded webinar: http://slidesha.re/1l6rOQc

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As we continue to peel back the layers of the onion and uncover what's *really* at the core of The Toyota Way, we've uncovered an entirely new development need for improvement professionals and leaders alike.

The key to establishing a continuous improvement culture is creating an organization of coaches and problem-solvers. In this webinar you will learn how to transition from the traditional role of "do-er" to that of facilitator and finally, to a skilled coach. No matter where you are on the spectrum, there's something for you in this webinar.

Specifically, you will learn:
• How "doing" for others violates Toyota's core principle of respect for people.
• The difference between facilitating and coaching.
• Traits and skills you need to be an effective coach.
• How to roll out a development program across your organization to accelerate transformation.

Published in: Business, Education
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The Improvement Professional's Evolving Role: From Practitioner to Facilitator to Coach

  1. Company LOGO The Improvement Professional’s Evolving Role: From Practitioner to Facilitator to Coach August 11, 2011
  2. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Your Instructor  Early career as a scientist; migrated to quality & operations design in the mid-80’s.  Launched Karen Martin & Associates in 1993.  Provide business performance improvement and Lean transformation support in office, service & knowledge work environments.  Co-author of The Kaizen Event Planner; co- developer of Metrics-Based Process Mapping: An Excel-Based Solution; author of forthcoming book with a unique look at excellence (McGraw- Hill, May 2012).  Instructor in University of California, San Diego’s Lean Enterprise program. 2 Karen Martin, Principal Karen Martin & Associates
  3. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates How Skilled as a Coach Moderately Proficient (47%) Highly Proficient (13%) Just Beginning to Learn (34%) 3 Not Sure (6%)
  4. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates How Skilled as a Facilitator Moderately Proficient (37%) Highly Proficient (21%) Some Proficiency (29%) 4 No Experience (5%) No Response (8%)
  5. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Industries Represented Advertising Banking & financial services Consulting Education Energy & utilities Government Healthcare Information technology Insurance Manufacturing Pharmaceuticals Retail Telecommunications Transportation Travel & tourism 5
  6. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates You Will Learn… How “doing” violates Toyota’s core principle of respect for people. The differences between facilitating and coaching. Traits and skills you need to be an effective coach. How to roll out a development program across your organization. 6
  7. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates The Improvement Continuum: Current State 7
  8. Our Learning Continuum 8 2010200820041996 2011
  9. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Demonstrating Respect for People Removing obstacles to their success. Helping them achieve their intellectual and creative potential. 9 This means we must engage them in the problem-solving process, helping them meet both needs. Engaging ≠ Doing for them
  10. We’ve Moved Beyond… 10 We’ve moved beyond… To… In search of in need of
  11. We’ve Moved Beyond… 11 We’re rapidly moving toward Problem-Based Management To… Problems are Golden Problems are Hidden and “Bad” From…
  12. We’ve Moved Beyond… 12 So We Need to Move From… To… Relying on a small team of experts to solve problems Teaching everyone how to solve problems
  13. Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition Stuart & Hubert Dreyfus, 1980, University of California, Berkeley 13 Novice Advanced Beginner Competent Proficient Expert Adherence to strict rules; low degrees of confidence; high degrees of concentration Knows when to break “the rules”; high degrees of confidence; operates on “auto pilot”
  14. Improvement Skills Matrix – Philosophical (draft) 14 No  Knowledge Novice Advanced  Beginner Competent Proficient Expert Not  Applicable 0 1 2 3 4 5 N/A PDCA / PDSA Customer value Flow Eight wastes Process ownership Value stream alignment Supplier‐Customer relationship Cross‐functional relationships Monument identification Obstacles to flow Area of  Expertise Category Specific Knowledge or Skill Philosophy Improvement principles Process design
  15. Improvement Skills Matrix – Technical (draft) 15 No  Knowledge Novice Advanced  Beginner Competent Proficient Expert Not  Applicable 0 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Improvement Strategy Strategy deployment / hoshin kanri A3 Toyota Kata Value Stream Mapping Metrics‐Based Process Mapping 5 Why's Check sheets Cause‐and‐effect / fishbone diagrams Pareto charts 5S Batch analysis / reduction Changeover / setup reduction Co‐location / work cells Error‐proofing / quality‐at‐the‐source FIFO lane pull systems Kanban pull systems Load leveling / heijunka Visual management Work balancing / takt time Work standardization / job aids Implementation Techniques Kaizen Events Key performance indicators (KPI) KPI trend analysis Process audits Excel PowerPoint Word Visio Mapping tools (iGrafx, etc.) Project management Time management Software Other Area of  Expertise Category Specific Knowledge or Skill Technical Problem‐Solving Mapping Tools Root Cause Analysis Countermeasures Process management
  16. Improvement Skills Matrix – People (draft) 16 No  Knowledge Novice Advanced  Beginner Competent Proficient Expert Not  Applicable 0 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Basic psychology (Maslow, resistance, etc.) Coaching leadership Communication needs Innovation / Design theory Learning theory Mediation skills / conflict resolution Paradigm identification Rewards & incentives Socratic questions / appreciative inquiry Working with senior leadership Area of  Expertise Category Specific Knowledge or Skill People Leading Change 
  17. Improvement Skills Matrix – Business (draft) 17 No  Knowledge Novice Advanced  Beginner Competent Proficient Expert Not  Applicable 0 1 2 3 4 5 N/A Cash flow Expense categories / amounts Margins / profit Revenue sources / management Budget creation / management Customer service Inventory management Opportunities Trends Applicable law Industry standards Agile / Scrum Lean business management Six sigma Baldrige ISO‐9000 Shingo Staying current  Read, attend conferences, network Business Finance Operations Sales & Marketing Legal/Regulatory Improvement approaches Certification programs Area of  Expertise Category Specific Knowledge or Skill
  18. Create a Development Plan How to you move from one stage to the next? Expert help and practice. 18
  19. 19 Name/ Skill 5S A3 Coach A3 Owner Batch Size  Reduction Changeover  Reduction Co‐location Data Display Error‐Proofing Alex J Barbara K Bill R Bob P Bob V Carol D Frank L Gary B Jane G Lori M Nancy J Nick D Pedro R Sam S Tameka T Zack R Lean Coach Skills Matrix Tracking Development Or numbering system (Dreyfus): 0 - No experience 1 - Novice 2 - Advanced beginner 3 - Competent 4 - Proficient 5 - Expert Green – Highly proficient; can teach others Yellow – Competent; can do with minimal or no help Red – No experience Or role: Green – Coach (+ practitioner and facilitator) Yellow – Facilitator (+ practitioner) Red – Practitioner
  20. Improvement Professional Roles Role Primary Focus # People Involved Outcomes Focus Practitioner Doing it 1 Results Facilitator Leading others in doing it Many Primary - results; Secondary - people development Coach Teaching others how to do it 2-5 Primary - people development; Secondary - results 20
  21. The Facilitator’s Many Hats 21
  22. Mentoring RelationshipCoaching Relationship ? ? Focus: Asking questions Focus: Providing information Wisdom Wisdom Coach Coachee Mentor ? ? ? ? Mentee
  23. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Coaching the Improvement Kata: Five Questions 1. What’s your target condition?  How do we want to operate? (Not a metric outcome. 2. What’s the actual condition now? 3. What obstacles are preventing you from reaching the target condition? 4. What’s your next step? 5. When can we go and see what we’ve learned from taking that step? 23 Kata – routine or pattern that is practiced so that it becomes second nature.
  24. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Socratic Questioning Named for Socrates Based on his belief that the most effective learning results from a disciplined practice of thoughtful questioning.  Way of assuring “rigorous thinking” Open-ended questions that cause the learner to think deeply. 24
  25. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Socratic Questions  Clarification & reinforcing knowledge  “Why do you say that?”  “What does this mean?”  “Can you give me an example?”  “What do we already know?”  Probing assumptions  “What else could we assume?”  “What would happen if…?”  “Why are you assuming…?”  Probing reasons & evidence  “How do you know this?”  “Are these reasons they only reasons?”  “What do you think causes…?”  “Would it stand up in court?”  Probing viewpoints & perspectives  “Why is this better than that?”  “What would ___ say about it”?  “What are the pros and cons of…?”  “What’s the difference between ___ and ___?”  Probing implications & consequences  “Then what would happen?”  “How does ___ affect ___?”  “How could ___ be used to ___?”  “Why is ___ important?”  Questions about a question  “Why are you asking that question?”  “To answer this question, what questions would we have to answer first?” 25
  26. The Wisdom Comes in Knowing When to Coach and When to Mentor
  27. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Coaching Traits Needed  Service mentality  Critical thinking  Self-awareness  Psychological know-how  Knowing when to push and when to back off  Patience  Empathy (“I understand…”  Balance between rah-rah and results  Technical expertise  Ability to clearly communicate  No self-interest or need to control 27
  28. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates Development Program Senior Leadership  Learn PDCA & A3 Process  Coach managers Managers  Learn PDCA, A3 & Kata  Coach the frontlines Improvement professionals  Coach senior leaders & managers  Facilitate improvement activities 28
  29. 80% 70% 50% 30% 20% 10% Problem-Solve Experience Discuss See & Hear See Hear Read % Information Retained 29 “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.” – Confucius Workforce Development Considerations 95%
  30. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates You Will Learn… How “doing” violates Toyota’s core principle of respect for people. The differences between facilitating and coaching. Traits and skills you need to be an effective coach. How to roll out a development program across your organization. 30
  31. © 2011 Karen Martin & Associates 7770 Regents Road #635 San Diego, CA 92122 858.677.6799 ksm@ksmartin.com 31 For Further Idea Exchange Connect & learn Monthly newsletter: www.ksmartin.com/subscribe

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