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Five Critical Roles forHealthcare Marketing Executives              Karen Corrigan            Corrigan Partners LLC       ...
The changing face of competition . . .and healthcare marketing.• Restructuring markets and intensifying  competitor activi...
Five critical roles for healthcare marketers   Growth Strategist   Brand Advocate   Digital Change Agent   Experience ...
Role # 1:The marketer as growth strategist                      In nearly every other industry, marketing                ...
Revenue generation is the priority . . .                     For the foreseeable future, health systems                  ...
Focus on revenue-generating growth opportunities Building a powerful, relevant, differentiated brand position Developing...
Success requires a growth-oriented culture                    Marketing’s partnership and co-accountability               ...
Role #2:The marketer as brand advocateThe business of branding: Growth. Innovation. Leverage.• Brands influence consumer d...
Rapidly restructuring markets require newapproaches to brand leadershipBrand management must evolve to address and handle ...
Brand strength improves competitive performance                                     Brand leadership has never been more ...
Tracking the impact of brand investments onbusiness performance is imperative                                         Stra...
Core competencies of brand leadership                 Advanced brand research and analytic techniques                 Rele...
Role #3:The marketer as digital change agentWeb, social networking and mobile technologies are revolutionizing businesspro...
Building digital marketing capabilities is job one                  Invest in digital marketing structures, capabilities  ...
Master the art of digital and content marketing Harness the power of digital marketing to drive customer acquisition and ...
Lead the change . . .• Develop fluency in digital and social media -- use the tools  personally & professionally• Establis...
Role #4:The marketer as experience champion               Be a champion for customer-centered decision-                ma...
Experience happens by design; not by accident        People                      Processes       • Culture                ...
Help others learn from the “Elite 8%”  A Bain & Company study found that 80% of surveyed companies felt they   delivered ...
What can marketing do?   Employ innovative research techniques to generate rich insights into    customer needs, wants, e...
Role #5:The marketer as innovation catalyst                  Transformation of care delivery systems, business            ...
Marketing’s role has never been more crucial Creating new markets, moving market  share, developing new sources of revenu...
Align innovation efforts to strategy•   Needs driven innovations - emphasis is market research to    better understand cus...
Promote less talk, more action                 Healthcare consumers are frustrated by the                  complexities o...
The business enterprise has two and only two basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce r...
Embrace change, then drive transformation                                       26
Questions. Comments. Discussion. Karen Corrigan Founder/CEO Corrigan Partners karen@corriganpartners.com P 757.288.2480   ...
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Five critical roles for healthcare marketing executives

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Five critical roles for healthcare marketing executives

  1. 1. Five Critical Roles forHealthcare Marketing Executives Karen Corrigan Corrigan Partners LLC @karencorrigan Corriganpartners.com
  2. 2. The changing face of competition . . .and healthcare marketing.• Restructuring markets and intensifying competitor activities in anticipation of reform and other industry pressures• New reimbursement methods and care delivery models that require greater emphasis on customer engagement to optimize profitability• Transformation of marketing practice through web, social and mobile technologies 2
  3. 3. Five critical roles for healthcare marketers  Growth Strategist  Brand Advocate  Digital Change Agent  Experience Champion  Innovation Catalyst 3
  4. 4. Role # 1:The marketer as growth strategist  In nearly every other industry, marketing is valued as a revenue-generating business competency critical to driving growth, brand loyalty and better financial performance.  Now is the time for chief marketing officers to move aggressively to transform marketing practice from promotions-oriented tactics to growth- oriented strategic leadership. 4
  5. 5. Revenue generation is the priority . . .  For the foreseeable future, health systems will be operating with competing and somewhat conflicting objectives as they attempt to optimize commercial volumes for core clinical programs, while simultaneously building accountable care systems and capabilities.  Marketing executives must help health systems transcend the ‘pay for volume’ and ‘pay for value’ markets 5
  6. 6. Focus on revenue-generating growth opportunities Building a powerful, relevant, differentiated brand position Developing a core set of comprehensive ‘smart growth’ service lines Enhancing access and minimizing ‘leaky bucket’ and out-migration Creating and leveraging more tightly integrated physician structures Developing innovative payor/contracting relationships Developing competencies in population health management Diversifying ambulatory, post-acute, retail and on-line health services Creating future-ready models of care Expanding into new markets and new lines of business Creating a signature, customer-centric service culture Leveraging strategic information technologies Building revenue-generating marketing capabilities 6
  7. 7. Success requires a growth-oriented culture Marketing’s partnership and co-accountability with clinical operations, IT, finance, HR and other core business functions are critical to:  Driving alignment across the network (operations, IT, physicians, contracting, etc.)  Understanding changing payment methods and business models  Delivering on revenue growth and profit targets. 7
  8. 8. Role #2:The marketer as brand advocateThe business of branding: Growth. Innovation. Leverage.• Brands influence consumer decision-making and choices regarding health and medical care.• Brands shape the complex referral and transactional relationships among consumers, health services, physicians, hospitals and payers; strong brands create premium referral, partnering and contracting advantages.• Strong brands attract the best talent, and can be leveraged to benefit recruitment and retention.• Brands are about growth, revenue, profitability, market leverage, staff commitment and customer loyalty. 8
  9. 9. Rapidly restructuring markets require newapproaches to brand leadershipBrand management must evolve to address and handle the complexities of: Newly developing care delivery models Hospital and health system mergers & acquisitions Physician integration and owned medical practices Ambulatory, post acute and retail diversification Academic, technology and business partnerships Multi-market, multi-state expansion initiatives Enterprise IT/EHR/Website strategies Co-branding/co-marketing relationships 9
  10. 10. Brand strength improves competitive performance  Brand leadership has never been more important – or more challenging – for health systems  Rapidly changing competitive dynamics are taxing even well established healthcare brands  To date, brand investments in healthcare have been largely focused on identity systems, advertising and promotionsBrand alignment builds the brand-driven culture that transforms an  Brand and its interdependency on the operatingorganization from one that simply model is a fledging concept in healthcare ‘promotes a brand’ to one that ‘delivers the brand.’  Strategic, operational, clinical, physician and marketing alignment is essential to creating and delivering a meaningful, differentiating and durable brand value proposition 10
  11. 11. Tracking the impact of brand investments onbusiness performance is imperative Strategic Metrics Marketing Metrics Financial Metrics Performance Market Brand Market Customer Customer Business Metric Position Reputation Leverage Acquisition Retention Outcomes Sample Market share Industry rankings Contracting Awareness Satisfaction Sales revenue Measures Rate of growth Customer perceptions Recruitment Preference Referrals Margin MD perceptions Fundraising # inquiries Share of spend Payor mix Staff perceptions M&A/partnering # new customers Lifetime value Ratings Community benefit $$/new ventures Volumes Brand loyalty Focus How is brand equity leveraged to create and sustain How do brand perceptions influence How does customer competitive advantage? customer behavior? behavior create tangible economic value?©Corrigan Partners LLC  Strong brands influence consumer choice  Strong brands attract and retain the best talent The bottom line  Strong brands create contracting, partnering leverage  Strong brands shape referral patterns  Strong brands build customer loyalty  Strong brands better weather economic cycles 11
  12. 12. Core competencies of brand leadership Advanced brand research and analytic techniques Relevant, defensible brand value proposition Purposeful, consistent brand experience Brand-driven growth pipeline Leveraged brand equity 12
  13. 13. Role #3:The marketer as digital change agentWeb, social networking and mobile technologies are revolutionizing businessprocesses everywhere and marketers can be change agents by helping healthsystems better understand how to employ these technologies to: Reach and engage consumers Acquire and retain customers Improve patient-provider relationships Support patients with care management Promote better clinical care and decision-making Facilitate workplace communications and productivity Build the brand 13
  14. 14. Building digital marketing capabilities is job one Invest in digital marketing structures, capabilities and support systems: • Integrated, multi-channel strategies • Integrated web, social, mobile marketing • Content marketing & management • Integrated CRM/contact center • Mobile media development & marketing • Digital brandscaping • Social commerce • Community management 14
  15. 15. Master the art of digital and content marketing Harness the power of digital marketing to drive customer acquisition and retention; digital marketing gives us real time access to the patient at the very moment they are interested; social engagement gives us deep insights into consumer needs and wants. Engaging the right audiences, in the right places, at the right time to drive revenue and brand loyalty is the goal of digital marketing. Success requires a thorough understanding of how consumers discover, consume and share information on-line; and the role of search and social interaction across the buying cycle. Make digital brandscaping a priority – deliver a positive, consistent brand experience in both virtual and physical environments. 15
  16. 16. Lead the change . . .• Develop fluency in digital and social media -- use the tools personally & professionally• Establish a vision and plan for digital and social marketing; restructure marketing and redesign marketing processes• Educate the organization as to how web, social and mobile are changing consumer behaviors, and how digital and social tools can enhance brand experience, improve health and facilitate business processes• Provide education to increase digital & social media skills in marketing and across the organization• Facilitate adoption of digital – web, social and mobile -- from top tier executives who may be entrenched in outdated ways• Make it easy for staff to do the right thing – help them understand the brand, understand the rules, understand the platforms 16
  17. 17. Role #4:The marketer as experience champion  Be a champion for customer-centered decision- making and innovations that transform customer experience.  Drive understanding across the health system that customer experience is more than HCAHPS scores and patient satisfaction . . . it’s about meeting customer expectations every day in every interaction through DESIGN – administrative systems, appointment scheduling, meeting and greeting, clinical processes, customer engagement, billing, follow-up, etc. 17
  18. 18. Experience happens by design; not by accident People Processes • Culture • Scheduling • Beliefs • Registration • Values • Treatment • Behaviors • Hand-offs Brand-Driven Experience Performance Framework Marketing • Service • Segments • Quality • Products • Lean • Channels • Six Sigma • Brand 18
  19. 19. Help others learn from the “Elite 8%”  A Bain & Company study found that 80% of surveyed companies felt they delivered good experiences; when their customers were interviewed, only 8% truly delivered. What sets the ‘elite 8’ apart?  They understand their customers and design the right offers and experiences for those customers.  They deliver experience by focusing the entire company on customer needs with an emphasis on cross-functional collaboration.  They develop capabilities to please customers again and again—by such means as continual innovation, training people in how to create new customer experiences, and establishing direct accountability for customer experience. Source: Harvard Management Update; Three D’s of Customer Experience; 2005
  20. 20. What can marketing do? Employ innovative research techniques to generate rich insights into customer needs, wants, expectations . . . Bring customers and providers together in planning and design sessions . . . Articulate the link between brand value proposition and experience . . . Keep experiences authentic…authentic to your brand value proposition, authentic to customer expectations, authentic to capabilities . . . Champion use of DESIGN to hardwire experience . . . Become a fan of demonstration projects; experiment, learn, apply . . . Educate, educate, educate . . .
  21. 21. Role #5:The marketer as innovation catalyst Transformation of care delivery systems, business processes, and market strategies are top priorities for health systems:  Innovations advance strategy, build brand equity, and produce a better bottom line.  Innovation rarely happens by chance; it happens more through the purposeful creation of innovation competencies and processes.  Innovation demands alignment of culture, capabilities and structure, as well as a laser focus on value-creation.  Transformation cannot happen without innovation. 21
  22. 22. Marketing’s role has never been more crucial Creating new markets, moving market share, developing new sources of revenue, building brand loyalty, improving profitability, and sustaining competitiveness are all goals of innovation. Marketers can help by creating a focused customer-centered approach to innovation and developing the platforms to drive creative solutions. Success stems from creative thinking, fresh solutions, and relevance to customers. That puts marketing front and center as the curator of customer intelligence. 22
  23. 23. Align innovation efforts to strategy• Needs driven innovations - emphasis is market research to better understand customer needs and discover market opportunities that can be addressed in unique ways; R & D is the core competency.• Relationship driven innovations - emphasis is mass customization as a competency to create one-to-one relationships, enabled by sophisticated, enabling CRM technology that recognizes, supports, and delivers customized solutions for valued customers.• Market driving innovations - resetting the rules of competition through value innovation; radical, disruptive moves that create new markets, transform customers into fans, and build such distinct points of competitive advantage that they are difficult to duplicate. 23
  24. 24. Promote less talk, more action  Healthcare consumers are frustrated by the complexities of access, fragmentation of care, lack of communications, and other aspects of their experiences.  Most of the industry is woefully behind in providing on-line conveniences such as scheduling and customer communications.  Opportunities for innovations that take the hassle out of healthcare are sizable.  So why aren’t more marketers driving changes in the customer experience realm? 24
  25. 25. The business enterprise has two and only two basic functions: marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce results; all the rest are costs. Peter Drucker 25
  26. 26. Embrace change, then drive transformation 26
  27. 27. Questions. Comments. Discussion. Karen Corrigan Founder/CEO Corrigan Partners karen@corriganpartners.com P 757.288.2480 @karencorrigan blog @ karencorrigan.com

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