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2015 LibraryTrends for NE Florida

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Bringing national trends in community, information, learning and technology to public libraries in northeast Florida. Building on strong foundations and great data from Pew Internet & American Life, Aspen Institute, the Institute for the Future and the University of Maryland Digital Inclusion Survey.

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2015 LibraryTrends for NE Florida

  1. 1. + Karen Archer Perry Clarion Collaborative @KarenAPerry www.ClarionCollaborative.com Library Trends 2015 Translating National Trends to Local Action in Northeast Florida
  2. 2. Agenda • Libraries Today – Four Key Strengths On which to build Questions Break • 2015-2016 Trends – Four Key Trends Impacting our work Discussion
  3. 3. Libraries have strong foundations
  4. 4. 1. Trusted Civic Institutions 2. Knowledge & Information 3. Learning Places 4. Technology Connectors Four Key Library Strengths
  5. 5. Libraries are Trusted Civic Institutions
  6. 6. Libraries are appreciated • 91% say libraries are important to their communities • 76% say libraries are important to them and their families Reference: Library Services in the Digital Age, Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell, January 22, 2013, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/
  7. 7. Libraries stack up well • Gallup poll asks about personal confidence in specific American Institutions (Gallup does not include libraries) • Pew poll asks about importance of libraries Reference: Pew Internet and Gallup June 1-4, 2013 Confidence Poll, http://www.gallup.com/poll/1597/confidence-institutions.aspx
  8. 8. Almost half of America came through your doors • 46% of Americans visited a library or a bookmobile in- person last year. • 22% used library websites in the past year. • 27% of Americans used library computers, Internet or Wi-Fi connections Reference: Libraries at the Crossroads, John Horrigan, September 15, 2015, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/09/15/libraries-at-the-crossroads/ Photo credit: Lockport Public Library, http://www.lockportlibrary.org/
  9. 9. Many of them wearing shirts proclaiming their love! Photo credit: Lisa Fernow
  10. 10. People like librarians • 98% of “ever” library visitors say interactions “very positive” • 81% of library visitors say librarians are “very helpful” • 50% of “last year” visitors got help from a librarian Reference: Library Services in the Digital Age, Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell, January 22, 2013, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/ Photo credit: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Flickr
  11. 11. People appreciate core library services 80% of Americans say borrowing books is “very important” 80% say reference librarians are “very important” 77% say free access to computers and the internet is "very important"” Reference: Library Services in the Digital Age, Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell, January 22, 2013, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/ Photo credit: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
  12. 12. Libraries Hold Keys to Knowledge & Information
  13. 13. Librarians are THE champions of the first amendment • Intellectual Freedom • Free speech • Privacy • Equal access • Open Internet • Copyright Photo credit: American Library Association President Roberta Stevens
  14. 14. People love to read! • 87% adults 16+ read a book last year • 37% adults read an e- book last year • 6% borrowed at e- book from the library Reference: Libraries at the Crossroads, John Horrigan, September 15, 2015, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/09/15/libraries-at-the-crossroads/ Photo credit: Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
  15. 15. Readers Read – More with e-Content 15 = Average # of books read last year 24 = Average for those with e-readers 30% e-content consumers say they read more 41% tablets consumers say they read more Reference: Library Services in the Digital Age, Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell, January 22, 2013, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/ Photo credit: LucReid http://www.lucreid.com/?p=2621
  16. 16. 16% 17% 26% 40% 46% Borrow a music CD Borrow an audio book Use computer or internet Borrow a DVD Use a research database Among those who visited a library in-person in the past year, the % who did the following activities Libraries are community hubs for Information and media access Reference: Reference: Library Services in the Digital Age, Kathryn Zickuhr, Lee Rainie and Kristen Purcell, January 22, 2013, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://libraries.pewinternet.org/2013/01/22/library-services/ Data is for library visitors ages 16+.
  17. 17. Hubs for digital content & services
  18. 18. • 65% of American’s say that libraries contribute to helping people decide what information they can trust. Reference: Libraries at the Crossroads, John Horrigan, September 15, 2015, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/09/15/libraries-at-the-crossroads/
  19. 19. Libraries are Learning Places
  20. 20. Hubs for learning resources Reference: Digital Inclusion Survey 2011-2012, Information Policy & University of Maryland, http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/ Public Access Computing 100% Education & Learning 99.5% Employment & Workforce 95% E-Government & Civics 75% Health & Wellness 57.9% % of Libraries Offering Programs
  21. 21. Leaders in early literacy & learning • 76% of parents say libraries are “very important” for children • 86% of parents with incomes less that $50K say “very important”
  22. 22. Library role in learning & literacy is “definitely” important • 85% also say that libraries should “definitely” offer free literacy programs to help kids prepare for school. • 85% of Americans say that libraries should “definitely” coordinate with schools in providing resources for children. • 78% believe that libraries are effective at promoting literacy and love of reading. Reference: Libraries at the Crossroads, John Horrigan, September 15, 2015, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/09/15/libraries-at-the-crossroads/
  23. 23. Librarians are America’s Digital Literacy Corps • 78% of those 16 and older say libraries should “definitely” offer programs to teach people how to use digital tools such as computers, smartphones and apps. • 75% say libraries have been effective at helping people learn how to use new technologies. Reference: Libraries at the Crossroads, John Horrigan, September 15, 2015, Pew Research Internet & American Life Project, http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/09/15/libraries-at-the-crossroads/
  24. 24. Hubs for supporting technology use • 89.9% of libraries offer training in general Internet use • 86.9% offer assistance with basic computing • 84.4% offer support with common productivity software and services • 79.3% offer point-of-use technology training and support Reference: University of Maryland and the American Library Association, Digital Inclusion Survey, 2014 data, 2015 report, http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/.
  25. 25. Libraries are Community Technology Hubs
  26. 26. Access: Public Access Computers 34.6 22.6 17.3 8.6 17.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 Number of PACs City Suburban Town Rural Overall
  27. 27. Access > More than PCs 77.9% 39.4% 62.5% 41.6% 20.7% 25.5% 44.8% 23.8% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%
  28. 28. Free Wi-Fi is almost ubiquitous 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00% 120.00% 2009 2009 2010 2011 2013 2014 Series 1
  29. 29. Library broadband speeds are increasing Reference: University of Maryland and the American Library Association, Digital Inclusion Survey, 2014 data, 2015 report, http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/. 0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 1.5 Mbps or less 1.6 -10 Mbps > 10 Mbps 2011 2013 2014
  30. 30. Access: Broadband digitalinclusion.umd.edu 159.0 40.0 93.4 25.0 38.9 15.0 25.1 10.0 70.4 16.0 0.0 20.0 40.0 60.0 80.0 100.0 120.0 140.0 160.0 180.0 Mean Speed (Mbps) Median Speed (Mbps) City Suburban Town Rural Overall
  31. 31. Access: Digital Catalogues Growing 90.3% 53.1% 50.8% 62.3% 56.0% 76.8% 46.5% 42.7% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0%
  32. 32. Libraries report gaps in “building adequacy” 38.0% 49.3% 87.6% 79.1% 45.2% 61.9% 50.4% 12.3% 17.0% 53.8% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% Availability of general use space Availability of meeting rooms/meeting spaces for public use Availability of maker spaces Availability of work/office spaces for business users Adequacy of electric supply,number of electrical outlets, network capacity Poor/Fair Good/ExcellentMean Year Built: 1970
  33. 33. Program depth is correlated w/ building renovations 67.3% 70.1% 15.8% 10.3% 14.4% 53.6% 60.2% 10.3% 6.5% 7.9% 55.9% 61.8% 11.2% 7.4% 9.3% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% Social media General familiarity with new technologies Using video conferencing technologies Web site development Digital content creation PercentageofLibrariesOfferingTraining Training Topic Renovated Not Renovated Overall digitalinclusion.umd.edu
  34. 34. Libraries already have an Edge Practical and aspirational benchmarks organized into three categories that assess: • Community value • Engaging the community • Organizational management
  35. 35. 1. Trusted Civic Institutions 2. Knowledge & Information 3. Learning Places 4. Technology Connectors Four Key Library Strengths
  36. 36. Questions?
  37. 37. Four Trends for 2015-2016 1. People seek fulfilling experiences 2. Information abundance drives knowledge economy 3. Learning is unbundled & continuous 4. Cloud-based and mobile
  38. 38.  TREND People seek fulfilling experiences Libraries focus on experiences instead of products
  39. 39. Engagement, loyalty and advocacy are no longer driven by the products you sell. It’s driven by how well the experience you deliver meets your customers’ ever-changing emotional needs and wants. 40 Lewis Carbone
  40. 40. It’s about the experience not the transaction 41 Product or Service Place People
  41. 41. Create the customer experience Reference: King County Library System and Fernow Consulting • Simplify the environment • Foster discovery • Intentional staff training • Visual trumps all other senses • People matter • Platforms matter
  42. 42. People Place Platform Reference and Photo Credit: Aspen Institute, “Rising to the Challenge – Re-envisioning Public Libraries, http://as.pn/libraries.
  43. 43. Libraries designs invite and engage… Photo Credit: King County Library System, Newport Way and Federal Way Branches
  44. 44. Library websites offer seamless intuitive services
  45. 45. “Take away my people, but leave my factories, and soon grass will grow on the factory floors. Take away my factories, but leave my people, and soon we will have a new and better factory.”- Andrew Carnegie
  46. 46. Turn Outward
  47. 47. Connect and Convene
  48. 48. Engage Deeply
  49. 49. Enlist Support
  50. 50.  TREND Information abundance drives knowledge economy Librarians help people discern value & create content
  51. 51. Information and Communications Technology ICT NetworkedBig Data Open Innovation Adaptive Analytics Places greater reliance on intellectual and technological capabilities than on manual labor or natural resources.
  52. 52. There’s an information explosion! • Knowledge is doubling every 12 months, maybe faster. • People need help navigating to meaning Reference: "Knowledge Doubling Every 12 Months, Soon to be Every 12 Hours," Industry Tap, David Russell Schilling, April 19th, 2013, http://www.industrytap.com/knowledge-doubling-every-12- months-soon-to-be-every-12-hours/3950
  53. 53. Opportunities for content creation abound… People crave support @KarenAPerry Photo credit: Lion’s Share Digital lionssharedigital.com
  54. 54. Libraries need to be places where people create new things
  55. 55. Without libraries, voices will be unheard Photo credit: Mike Yam & Toronto Disaster Relief Committee, 2010
  56. 56.  TREND Learning is Unbundled & Continuous Libraries support new modes of on-demand learning for individuals and communities
  57. 57. Reference: Aspen Institute Task Force on Learning and the Internet, 2015, “Learner at the Center of a Networked World,” http://csrepor ts.aspeninstit ute.org/Task- Force-on- Learning-and- the- Internet/2014 /report.
  58. 58. Learner at the Center of a networked world 1. Learners need to be at the center of learning networks. 2. Every student should have access to learning networks. 3. Learning networks need to be interoperable. 4. Learners should have the literacies necessary to utilize media as well as safeguard themselves in the digital age. 5. Students should have safe and trusted environments for learning.
  59. 59. Trends in Learning & Education • Digital technology is disrupting all economic sectors and revamping the educational landscape. ICT is part of everything we do. • Competency-based programs value skill acquired more than pedagogy, bringing new benefits to students, institutions and potential employers. • Unbundled learning creates new opportunities and challenges for assessment. Reference: F. Martinez and K. Perry, Intel, 2015, Bridging the Global Skills Gaps Through Digital Learning, http://nextcenturycities.org/wp/wp- content/uploads/2015/05/Intel_Bridging-the-Global-Skills-Gap.pdf.
  60. 60. People need new skills • 1/3 to 1/2 of adults - depending on the country - lack the basic skills necessary for learning and working in modern economies • Problem-solving in technology-rich environments, literacy, and numeracy Reference: 2012 OECD Report, report, Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Lives, http://skills.oecd.org/documents/SkillsHighlightsEnglish.pdf
  61. 61. Digital Literacy is way more than point-and-click
  62. 62. Future Works Skills 2020
  63. 63. 1. Extreme longevity 2. Rise of smart machines & systems 3. Computational world 4. New media ecology 5. Super-structured organizations 6. Globally connected world Future Work 2020 Six Drivers for Change
  64. 64. 1.Sense-making 2.Social intelligence 3.Novel & adaptive thinking 4.Cross-cultural competency 5.Computational thinking Future Work 2020 Ten Skills for the Future Workforce 6. New-media literacy 7. Transdisciplinarity 8. Design mindset 9. Cognitive load management 10.Virtual collaboration
  65. 65.  TREND Cloud-based and mobile Libraries create more physical and virtual collaborations
  66. 66. Educause Top 10 IT issues 2015 1. Hiring, retaining, training qualified staff. 2. Optimizing the use of technology in teaching and learning. 3. Developing IT funding models that sustain core services, support innovation, and facilitate growth. 4. Improving student outcomes. 5. Demonstrating the business value and organizational alignment.
  67. 67. Educause Top 10 IT issues -2015 6. Increasing the IT organization's capacity for managing change. 7. Providing user support in the new normal: mobile, online education, cloud, and BYOD environments. 8. Developing mobile, cloud, and digital security policies that work for most of the institutional community. 9. Developing resilience IT architectures 10. Balancing agility, openness, and security. Reference, Grajeck, S. January 12,2015, “Top 10 It Issues, 2015: Inflection Point.”Retrieved from EDUCAUSE: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/top-10- it-issues-2015-inflection-point.
  68. 68. Mobile Anytime Information Access • Library in your pocket • Anywhere access • Device adaptive • Bandwidth adaptive • Responsive Reference: Gloucestershire Public Library, http://www.gloucestershire.gov.uk/mobile/article/116142/Install-our-Library-app
  69. 69. • Networks favor scale and connection – not islands of independence • Digital on-ramps and off-ramps for Cloud services • Creation hubs for community content Libraries create more physical and virtual collaborations
  70. 70. Reference: Institute of Museum and Library Services, University of Washington, International City/ County Management Association, 2012 January, “Building Digital Communities: A framework for action,” http://www.imls.gov/publications/building-digital-communities-framework-action. Access principles: Availability Affordability Design for inclusion Adoption principles: Relevance Digital literacy Consumer safety Application principles: Economic and workforce development Education Health care Public safety and emergency services Civic engagement Social connections
  71. 71. • Focus on experience instead of products • Discern value & create content • New modes of on- demand learning • Create physical & virtual collaborations Four 2015-2016 Trends 1. People seek fulfilling experiences 2. Information abundance drives knowledge economy 3. Learning is unbundled & continuous 4. Cloud-based and mobile
  72. 72. Discussion • What trends are impacting your community and patrons? • What one wish would you have for your library’s future?
  73. 73. + Karen Archer Perry Clarion Collaborative @KarenAPerry www.ClarionCollaborative.com Thank you! Translating National Trends to Local Action in Northeast Florida
  74. 74. “The public library is first and foremost a place…that promotes development in society. It is the family room of a community.” - Akhtar Badshah
  75. 75. The Cloud is useless without on ramps and off ramps • Community on-ramps for local content • Off-ramps to access and discerning value

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