Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Problem
•Childhood trauma is associated with multiple adverse
outcomes in adulthood.
•People with traumatic childhood back...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Resiliency as a Pathway of Influence for Childhood Trauma on Self-Esteem

164 views

Published on

Research presentation by Langston University students and Kamden Strunk on Resiliency as a Pathway of Influence for Childhood Trauma on Self-Esteem. Originally presented at the Southwestern Psychological Association in 2013.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Resiliency as a Pathway of Influence for Childhood Trauma on Self-Esteem

  1. 1. Problem •Childhood trauma is associated with multiple adverse outcomes in adulthood. •People with traumatic childhood backgrounds tend be more vulnerable for victimization (Widom, Czaja, Dutton, 2008) and psychological distress (Minnes, Singer, Humphrey-Wall, & Satayathum, 2008). •Childhood trauma may also lead to the development of antisocial tendencies and aggressive behaviors in adults (Krisher & Sevecke, 2008). •This has led to work on potential protective influences that might shield one from the effects of childhood trauma. •Researchers have investigated resiliency, which has been shown to influence self-esteem and life satisfaction (Mak, Ivy, Ng, & Wong, 2011). •Higher resilience is associated with better adjustment, emotional, and academic outcomes (Elias & Haynes, 2008; Foran, Adler, McGurk, & Bliese, 2012). •The purpose of the current study was to determine if resilience would serve as a mediator in the relationship between childhood trauma and self-esteem among college students. Method •Participants: 224 college students (90 men, 134 women) from two Midwestern state universities. •Mean age: 21.39 (SD = 4.72). •62.7% Black, Non-Hispanic •20.9% White, Non-Hispanic •16.4% All other ethnicities combined •Three self-report scales were used: •Brief Resiliency Scale (Smith, Dalen, Wiggins, Tooley, Christopher, & Bernard, 2008) •Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Short Form (Bernstein, et al., 2003) •Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1986) •That is, resilience doesn’t protect from the effects of childhood trauma, but is one avenue through which that influence travels. •It seems that childhood trauma negatively influences one’s resiliency, which negatively influences one’s self- esteem. •Resiliency explains some of the influence of childhood trauma, but does not appear to be a protective factor in this study. Conclusions •The hypothesis was not supported. •Childhood trauma directly influenced self-esteem, but some of its influence flowed through resiliency. •Resiliency seems to serve as a channel for the influence of trauma. For more information or a list of our references, please contact esmewalls@yahoo.com or kamden.strunk@okstate.edu Results •A path model was created with direct paths from all three indicators of childhood trauma to self-esteem, a direct path from resiliency to self-esteem, and paths from all three indicators of childhood trauma to resiliency. •Emotional abuse, sexual abuse, and emotional neglect were all negatively associated with self-esteem. •Resiliency was positively associated with self-esteem. •Emotional abuse and emotional neglect were negatively associated with resiliency. •As compared with direct prediction, emotional abuse is about the same, sexual abuse is about the same, and emotional neglect is about the same, in terms of total effect. Resiliency as a Pathway of Influence for Childhood Trauma on Self-Esteem Tatavia Butler, Esme L. Walls, Kamden K. Strunk, & Yvonne K. Montgomery Emotional Abuse Sexual Abuse Emotional Neglect Resiliency Self-Esteem -.150-.206 -.272 .325 .748-.210 .066NS -.175 .958 .610.404 .378 Emotional Abuse Sexual Abuse Emotional Neglect Self-Esteem -.208 -.184 -.342 .610.404 .378 Variable Direct Indirect Total Emotional Abuse -.150 -.057 -.207 Sexual Abuse -.206 .021 -.185 Emotional Neglect -.272 -.068 -.340

×