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Discoverable, Accessible, Reusable, and Transparent (DART): Scholarly Communications and the Research Museum

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Discoverable, Accessible, Reusable, and Transparent (DART): Scholarly Communications and the Research Museum. Martin R. Kalfatovic. Global Summit of Research Museums. Berlin. 5 November 2018.

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Discoverable, Accessible, Reusable, and Transparent (DART): Scholarly Communications and the Research Museum

  1. 1. Discoverable, Accessible, Reusable, and Transparent (DART): Scholarly Communications and the Research Museum Martin R. Kalfatovic | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-4563-462 Global Summit of Research Museums Berlin | 5 November 2018
  2. 2. Some Questions …  Are there commonalities across research museums in different disciplines when discussing open scholarly communications, data, and collections?  What are the key differences in these same areas across research museums in different disciplines?  Opening up research museum collections expands there use; what are the key metrics for showing impact of use and how does that relate to impact of publishing and data?
  3. 3. Scholarly Communication in a Research Museum Research Museums are based around a world of material culture. The collections, of which the public sees only a small part, are the basis for much of the scholarly work that occurs by researchers at these museums
  4. 4. Scholarly Communication in a Research Museum In many cases, the metrics of scholarly communication needs to address the issues around the use of the collections as raw material in the scholarly process.
  5. 5. What's DART?  Discoverable  Accessible  Reusable  Transparent Report from the “What is Open?” Workgroup. Rick Anderson, Seth Denbo, Diane Graves, Susan Haigh, Steven Hill, Martin Kalfatovic, Roy Kaufman, Catherine Murray-Rust, Kathleen Shearer, Dick Wilder, Alicia Wise. Open Scholarship Initiative Proceedings, Vol. 1, 2016DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13021/G8XK5R Taken together, these form a spectrum of open for the scholarly communication
  6. 6. Why Should Research Museums Be DART? https://aoasg.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/benefitsofopenaccess_cc-by_logo.pdf  Researchers in developing countries can see your work  Taxpayers get value for money  Practitioners can apply your findings  Higher citation rates  More exposure for your work  Compliant with grant rules  The public can access your findings  Your research can influence policy
  7. 7. Plug for the Biodiversity Heritage Library
  8. 8. Why Some Data/Collections Aren't Open  Intellectual Property Right  Copyright  Moral rights  Trademark  Patent  Rights of Privacy and Publicity  Personally Identifiable Information Smithsonian Directive 609 (rev. 11 July 2011)
  9. 9. Why Some Data/Collections Aren't Open  Contractual restriction  Native American and Native Hawaiian human remains and objects  Cultural items returned to their country of origin because of the circumstances of acquisition  Rare, threatened or endangered species Smithsonian Directive 609 (rev. 11 July 2011)
  10. 10. Why Some Data/Collections Aren't Open  Images, other media, or data that reveal the location of archeological, paleontological, geological, sacred and historic sites  Uncertain provenance and export records (e.g., Holocaust-era assets)  Conservation, management, inventory, valuation, and other business records Smithsonian Directive 609 (rev. 11 July 2011)
  11. 11. Metrics of Scholarly Communication Smithsonian Examples
  12. 12. Metrics of Scholarly Communication Many of the reports are standard impact analysis, but for the past few years, Altmetrics have been employed to provide an additional lens into the impact of research.
  13. 13. Research Information Management Smithsonian Libraries manages over 86,385 Smithsonian- authored scholarly publications & datasets through Smithsonian Research Online (SRO), is launching an expertise-locator platform called Smithsonian Profiles, and spearheading a movement towards institution- wide Research Data Management
  14. 14. Research Data Management Increasingly, institutions must manage not just the outcomes of scholarly activities, but the data that underlies the published/public outcomes.
  15. 15. Identifiers: Keys to Research Information Management  ORCID for People  DataCite for Data  DOIs for Articles  … and many more!
  16. 16. Identifiers: Keys to Research Information Management ORCID for Facilities Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute | Barro Colorado Island
  17. 17. Identifiers: Keys to Research Information Management ORCID for Facilities  Researchers do not often report on their use of facilities or specialized equipment when they are publishing papers, datasets, or other research results. When they do, it is usually in the acknowledgments section of a paper and not in a standardized form.  Publishers do not often collect information on user facilities, instead focusing on funding sources for the published work that are related to journal article access policies.  User facilities require researchers to acknowledge use, but there is both a lag between use and publication and no general standard for citing usage.  Differing understanding of terms such as “author”, “user”, and “funding” among stakeholders present barriers to effective reporting.  All of the stakeholders see value in using APIs and persistent identifiers, including ORCID iDs and DOIs, to enable reporting processes. https://orcid.org/blog/2017/12/07/using-identifiers-capture-and-expose-facilities-use
  18. 18. “The worth and importance of the Institution is not to be estimated by what it accumulates within the walls of its building, but by what it sends forth to the world.” — Joseph Henry (1853) Smithsonian Secretary
  19. 19. Some Questions …  Are there commonalities across research museums in different disciplines when discussing open scholarly communications, data, and collections?  What are the key differences in these same areas across research museums in different disciplines?  Opening up research museum collections expands there use; what are the key metrics for showing impact of use and how does that relate to impact of publishing and data?
  20. 20. Thank You | Vielen Dank! Martin R. Kalfatovic | ORCID ID: 0000-0002-4563-462 Global Summit of Research Museums Berlin | 5 November 2018

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