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E textiles for military uniforms

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Electronic textile materials used for the military clothings

Published in: Engineering

E textiles for military uniforms

  1. 1. CONTENTS INTRODUCTION  SMART FABRIC STATISTICS  SMART CLOTHING  SENSATEX SMART SHIRT  CITYZEN SMART SENSE  WEARABLE ELECTRIC BLANKET  PIEZO SENSITIVE MATERIALS  SOLAR ARRAY BLANKETS  ANTENNAS  COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS  PHOTOVOLTAIC FIBRE  FLEXIBLE SENSORS  CAMOUFLAGE  REFERENCES
  2. 2. INTRODUCTION  The ability to integrate electronics into textiles provides the potential to achieve revolutionary improvements in performance and the realization of capabilities never before imagined on the battlefield.  Electronic devices are being miniaturized for personal use both in the commercial and military sectors. Materials and methods are being investigated to facilitate the integration of these electronics into textiles.
  3. 3. SMART FABRIC END USE MARKETS 2011
  4. 4. SMART CLOTHING
  5. 5. REIMA SMART CLOTHING
  6. 6. SENSATEX SMART SHIRT
  7. 7. SENSATEX SMART SHIRT  If a soldier wears the “Smart Shirt” during war and gets injured, information on the wound and the soldier’s condition would be immediately transmitted to a medical triage unit near the battlefield.  This shirt can help a physician determine the extent of a soldier’s injury based on the strength of his heartbeat and respiratory rate.  This information lets physicians know the urgency of who to treat first.
  8. 8. CITYZEN SMART SENSE  Connect the garment to a compact, battery-powered transmitter, turn on the smartphone's bluetooth connection, and suddenly have a customized body monitoring system.  The fabric communicates with an app on the phone to keep tabs on heart rate, respiration and metrics. Ultimately, the system notes how tired or stressed the person is, and could even alert for the onset of a medical problem.  In spite of its high-tech nature, the Smart Sensing fabric can be washed and ironed normally.
  9. 9. CITYZEN SMART SHIRT
  10. 10. WEARABLE ELECTRIC BLANKET  An electric blanket was developed without the stiff, bulky wires traditionally used.  The new blanket is lighter, more flexible and can be machine-washed and dried. Plugged in, it warms evenly using the same amount of power as a 100 W light bulb.
  11. 11. PIEZO SENSITIVE MATERIALS PVDF [poly(vinylidene fluoride)] and its copolymers P(VDF- TrFE) [poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene)] and P(VDF- TFE) – [poly (vinylidene fluoride-tetrafluoroethylene)] exhibit the best electromechanical performances.
  12. 12. PIEZO SENSITIVE MATERIALS  For a soldier or adventurer stranded for days without access to electrical outlets, this kind of technology holds great potential. The material can be used for under the boots.  If the rate of change of application of load is higher, then the voltage produced will be higher.  Suddenly, there would be a way to revive depleted batteries in a satellite phone or GPS unit. A situation that was once potentially deadly could be managed much more easily just by simply walking around for a while.
  13. 13. SOLAR ARRAY BLANKETSU.S. Naval Research Laboratory has developed solar array blankets that combine high power output with light weight and flexibility. The technology, known as inverted metamorphic (IMM) triple junction (3J) solar cells, allows a thin membrane material to be placed on a flexible substrate. The resulting solar blanket has a higher power output while being lightweight.
  14. 14. ECG & EMG MEASUREMENT
  15. 15. ANTENNAS Double loop antenna integrated into the MOLLE vest with ergonomic modules. Frequency Range: 30–88-MHz Eight-element patch antenna array Frequency Range: upto 2.4 GHz
  16. 16. COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS
  17. 17. COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS
  18. 18. PHOTOVOLTAIC FIBRE The MDMO-PPV:PCBM compound produced 300 mV and 0.27 mA/cm 2 , giving a fill factor of 26% and an efficiency of 0.021% The fill factor is determined by the ratio between the actually achievable maximum power (given by the current times the voltage at the maximum power point (mpp)) and the theoretical value (given by the short- circuit current (I sc ) times the open- circuit voltage (V oc )) P3HT - Poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) PCBM - Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester MDMO-PPV — poly[2-méthoxy-5-(3,7- diméthyloctyloxy)-1,4-phénylène-vinylène] PEDOT:PSS - Poly(3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene) Polystyrene sulfonate
  19. 19. FLEXIBLE SENSORSSingle crystal silicon accelerometer with mG resolution (1 G=9.81 m/s2) has been fabricated using Silicon Fusion Bonding (SFB) and Deep Reactive Ion Etching (DRIE).
  20. 20. Signal obtained from an acceleration sensor with a sample rate of 32 Hz and a resolution of 10 mG
  21. 21. CAMOUFLAGE  Color change is activated by body heat or through resistive heating that employs a layering of conductive and thermochromic inks (on battery testers), in which case the conductive/resistive ink heats up and changes the color of the ink.  Shimmering Flower- Product Name  This textile can have up to sixty four fabric pixels arranged in an arbitrary design. Each pixel is individually addressable (with conductive yarns) and is controlled to slowly change color. Each color change can be programmed in the custom electronics board or controlled in real time when the display is connected to a computer through the serial port.
  22. 22. REFERENCES  Smart clothes and wearable technology, Edited by J. McCann and D. Bryson, Woodhead Publishing in Textiles  Multidisciplinary know- how for smart- textiles developers, Edited by Tünde Kirstein, Woodhead Publishing in Textiles  Wearable electronics and photonics, Edited by Xiaoming Tao, Woodhead Publishing Limited  A novel intelligent textile technology based on silicon flexible skins, Rakesh B. Katragadda, Yong Xu, Sensors and Actuators A 143 (2008) 169–174
  23. 23. REFERENCES Electronic Textiles: Wearable Computers, Reactive Fashion, and Soft Computation, Joanna Berzowska, Textile, Volume 3  Development of Electronic Textiles to Support Networks, Communications, and Medical Applications in Future U.S. Military Protective Clothing Systems, Carole A. Winterhalter, Justyna Teverovsky, Patricia Wilson, Jeremiah Slade, Wendy Horowitz, Edward Tierney, and Vikram Sharma, IEEE Transactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Vol. 9, No. 3, September 2005  Potential Space Applications For Body-centric Wireless And E- textile Antennas, T.F. Kennedy, P.W. Fink, A.W. Chu, G.F. Studor, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, USA  Smart Textiles for Soldier of the Future, 0. Sahin, 0. Kayacan, E. Yazgan Bulgun, Defence Science Journal, Vol. 55, No. 2, April 2005

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