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Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10 - Food Systems and Nutrition

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Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10 - Food Systems and Nutrition

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Open to UK and African organisations who want to collaborate on an Agri-Tech project around food chain innovation in Africa.

Are you working on Agri-Tech innovation and would like to implement some of your ideas in Africa?

If so, you could get funding thanks to the Agri-Tech Catalyst Competition, Round 10, opening on 20 July.

The funding available through the competition is for Agri-Tech projects on food chain innovations in Africa. These projects need to be delivered by a UK and an African organisation working together.


Find out more here: https://ktn-uk.co.uk/news/agri-tech-catalyst-competition-round-10

Open to UK and African organisations who want to collaborate on an Agri-Tech project around food chain innovation in Africa.

Are you working on Agri-Tech innovation and would like to implement some of your ideas in Africa?

If so, you could get funding thanks to the Agri-Tech Catalyst Competition, Round 10, opening on 20 July.

The funding available through the competition is for Agri-Tech projects on food chain innovations in Africa. These projects need to be delivered by a UK and an African organisation working together.


Find out more here: https://ktn-uk.co.uk/news/agri-tech-catalyst-competition-round-10

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Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10 - Food Systems and Nutrition

  1. 1. The Knowledge Transfer Network What we do KTN is the UK’s innovation network. It brings together businesses, entrepreneurs, academics and funders to develop new products, processes and services We help business to grow the economy and improve people’s lives by capturing maximum value from innovative ideas, scientific research and creativity Register for KTN Agri-Food newsletters: https://ktn-uk.co.uk/newsletter
  2. 2. Simon Baty – Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) Lucy Mather – Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) Pedro Carvalho – Knowledge Transfer Network (KTN) Kathryn Miller – Innovation Lead, Innovate UK Welcome
  3. 3. Aims of today’s event: 1) Better understand competition objectives, scope and rules 2) Opportunities to develop ideas and partnerships for the competition - Learn lessons from previously funded projects - Consortia building session – via meeting mojo and LinkedIn group Overall – Help you be successful! Event overview
  4. 4. 1) Questions Type questions using the chat box on YouTube Please only ask questions relevant to wider audience - we will answer some during the event. If your competition question is not addressed or for private questions, please contact: support@innovateuk.ukri.org How to participate today
  5. 5. 2) Meeting Mojo Please register via https://agritech-catalyst-round10.meeting-mojo.com/ to ensure your profile is available (you can use your LinkedIn profile if this saves time). This tool allows you to connect with partners and facilitates introductions and online conversations. Please use the Capabilities Document we issued earlier this week, to identify people you would like to connect with. How to participate today cont’d
  6. 6. 3) LinkedIn group Please feel free to register now for this LinkedIn group, as we will use it for consortia building session (weblink also in the joining instructions email you were sent): https://www.linkedin.com/groups/8766913/ How to participate today cont’d
  7. 7. Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10 Agriculture and food systems innovation: Food Systems and Nutrition
  8. 8. Innovate UK
  9. 9. We work with the government to invest over £7 billion a year in research and innovation by partnering with academia and industry to make the impossible, possible. Through the UK’s nine leading academic and industrial funding councils, we create knowledge with impact.
  10. 10. Innovate UK drives productivity and growth by supporting businesses to realise the potential of new technologies, develop ideas and make them a commercial success. Innovate UK To stay competitive as an advanced economy, we need to do things that others cannot do, or to do things in different and better ways.
  11. 11. Competition scope
  12. 12. Agri-Tech Strategy • Launched 22 July 2013 • Aims to improve the translation of research into practical application for agriculture and related industries in UK and overseas • £160M government investment over 5yrs: • Agri-tech Catalyst (£70m) • Centres for Agricultural Innovation (£90m) – Agri-Tech Centres
  13. 13. AgriTech Catalyst • DFID has provided funding for the AgriTech Catalyst since it was launched in 2013 • 58 projects over eight rounds, 53 of those in Africa • Côte d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Nepal, Nigeria, Somalia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe • Since Round 7 the AgriTech Catalyst has been focussed on Africa • Round 10 funded through the GCRF Photo Credit: CABI
  14. 14. AgriTech Catalyst Value addition Food safety Non food uses of crops Control of crop pests Improving productivity Livestock disease Control of crop disease Reducing food losses
  15. 15. • £10m investment to support competitions including rounds 7 onwards • £15m additional funding through GCRF from round 8 onwards Timeline: ₋ Round 9 – 14 October 2019 – 8 January 2020 ₋ Round 10 – 20 July – 21 October 2020 (this competition) ₋ Round 11 – To be confirmed, provisional open date March 2021 Latest funding available
  16. 16. Key dates Timeline Dates Competition Open date 20th July 2020 Online Theme Specific Brokerage Events 9th July 2020 • Crop • Livestock & Aquaculture • Food Systems and Nutrition Online Competition Briefing 28th July 2020 Submission Deadline 21st October 2020 – 11am Applicants informed 18th December 2020 Projects to start April 2021
  17. 17. - Projects must show the potential to deliver impact for poor people through the uptake of agricultural and food systems technology and innovation - Scope of the Catalyst includes: - primary crop and livestock production including aquaculture - non-food uses of crops, excluding ornamentals - challenges in downstream food processing, distribution or storage and value addition - Improving availability and accessibility of safe, healthy and nutritious foods - Your project’s innovations must: - be sustainable in the context of environmental challenges such as climate change and resource scarcity - minimise negative effects such as pollution, food losses and waste Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10: Scope
  18. 18. Areas of interest Livestock • genetic improvement for productivity/disease resistance • development and access to livestock vaccines and medicines • control of livestock pests and diseases including penside diagnostics • increasing the value of production to smallholders Crops • speeding up the development of new varieties for current and future conditions. • reducing post harvest loss on farm and through the value chain • control of crop pests, weeds and diseases • increasing the value of production to smallholder Food Systems • downstream food processing, distribution or storage and value addition • innovation that supports food systems to deliver nutritious, healthy and safe food • meeting quality standards and improving productivity • addressing food safety issues through the value chain • new food technologies and data- driven food systems, including for urban areas • Cross-cutting issues: big data, AI, providing information to farmers, integrating smallholders into supply chains
  19. 19. Official Development Assistance and Research - Official Development Assistance (ODA) is defined as flows to countries and territories on the DAC List of ODA Recipients - Only research directly and primarily relevant to the problems of developing countries may be counted as ODA - Applications must clearly demonstrate that they propose work that will benefit agriculture and food systems in Africa and how they will deliver this benefit. - During the lifetime of a project, it may not impact large numbers of people, but proposals must show how a project will build a pathway to future development impact. - There can be benefits to the UK – companies/researchers – but this must be secondary in nature. - Activities in the UK must clearly be for challenges in Africa, not for the UK market.
  20. 20. Eligibility Criteria
  21. 21. Eligibility Criteria Project Eligibility • must be collaborative • must include a partner from an eligible African country, who can be the technical lead • must include a UK-based administrative lead • must be carried out in the UK or an eligible African country or both • must include at least one business in the consortium Project costs • Early stage feasibility studies: £100,000 to £500,000, 12 to 18 months. • Mid stage industrial research: £250,000 to £1 million, up to 3 years. • Late stage experimental development: £150,000 to £800,000, up to 18 months. Projects must start by 1 April 2021
  22. 22. Angola Benin Burkina Faso Burundi Cameroon Central African Republic Chad Congo (Brazzaville) Congo, Democratic Republic of Côte d'Ivoire Eritrea Ethiopia Gambia, The Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau Kenya Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Mozambique Niger Nigeria Rwanda Sao Tome and Principe Senegal Sierra Leone Somalia South Africa South Sudan Sudan Tanzania Togo Uganda Zambia Zimbabwe Eligible Countries
  23. 23. For Early Stage feasibility studies and industrial research awards, you could get up to: • 70% of eligible project costs for micro or small business • 60% for medium-sized business • 50% for large business For experimental development projects which are nearer to market, you could get up to: • 45% of eligible project costs for micro or small business • 35% for medium-sized business • 25% for large business Grant intervention rates for business
  24. 24. • For early-stage feasibility studies and mid stage industrial research projects the total costs for your research partners must not exceed 50% of the total project costs • If your consortium contains more than one research organisation, this maximum will be shared between them • For late stage experimental development projects: research base partners cannot claim funding but can participate as subcontractors. • Universities can claim 100% (80% of Full Economic Costs) • Other research organisations can claim 100% of their project costs • Public Sector Organisation or Charity can claim 100% of their project costs Research partner participation rules
  25. 25. Application Process
  26. 26. Search for a funding competition and review criteria
  27. 27. • Project Summary • Short summary and objectives of the project including what is innovative about it • Public Description • Description of your project which will be published if you are successful • Scope • How does your project align with the scope of this competition? • If your project is not in scope, it will be ineligible for funding Q1 – Equality, Diversity and Inclusion data – EDI survey Q2 – Consortium – List all organisations in your project Project Details – not scored
  28. 28. Application Questions Application form Question 3 Business opportunity Question 4 Market opportunity Question 5 Project results Question 6 Official development assistance (ODA) Question 7 International development (gender equality) act Question 8 Technical approach Question 9 Innovation Question 10 Risk Question 11 Project team Question 12 Financial commitment Question 13 Added value Appendix Q8 Appendix Q11 Appendix Q10 Appendix Q6 Detailed Guidance Available on IFS
  29. 29. To find out more about the Agri-Tech Catalyst, including the competition brief: Early stage: https://apply-for-innovation- funding.service.gov.uk/competition/659/overview#summary Mid stage: https://apply-for-innovation- funding.service.gov.uk/competition/661/overview Late stage: https://apply-for-innovation- funding.service.gov.uk/competition/660/overview Further Information
  30. 30. Customer Support Services: 0300 321 4357 (Mon-Fri) support@innovateuk.ukri.org Knowledge Transfer Network: www.ktn-uk.co.uk Innovate UK: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/innovate-uk Contact Us
  31. 31. @InnovateUK Innovate UKInnovate UK
  32. 32. Agri-Tech Catalyst Round 10 Agriculture and food systems innovation: Food Systems and Nutrition Webinar Case Study
  33. 33. 10/07/2020 High Protein Shelf Stable Expanded Snacks: Based on Arthropods and Local Carbohydrate Sources Agri-tech Catalyst round 8: agriculture and food systems innovation Number 105674
  34. 34. 10/07/2020 Why this project and why now? Global View • Sustainable agriculture • Income generation to rural communities • Economically viable foods for urban poor • Stable foodstuffs for nutritionally challenged • Better utilisation of protein sources Consortium IP Using interesting, but not necessary very expensive processing procedures we could make: • Product a bit like a rice cake • Can use a range of starchy materials as a base • Can get over 40% protein into product • Crispy to eat • Easy and safe storage ?
  35. 35. 10/07/2020 Use of insects 4 Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations proposed a global initiative to increase use of insects as food and feed to ensure future food security Insect consumption promoted for three major reasons: vnutritional value venvironmental benefits vlivelihood improvement (social and economic factors) If insects can be used with minimum processing the higher the utilisation criteria
  36. 36. 10/07/2020 Product as a vehicle for insect consumption 5 Product Specification: Use of whole insect- sustainable resource Minimum process- but must be safe Form a product that is easy to store, provide major nutritive benefits Can be eaten without further heating
  37. 37. 10/07/2020 Defining project Feasibility study: High Protein Shelf Stable Expanded Snacks: Based on Arthropods and Local Carbohydrate Sources (18 months) 6 Grow the starchy materials Breed insects Process together Locally sourced materials local product snacks –high value product for the nutritionally challenged Total food product Sustainable and safe Started November 2019
  38. 38. 10/07/2020 The consortium 7 Biopolymer Solutions Ltd; SME –interest in starchy materials and processing Sandra Hill, Anne Clothilde Guyot, Val Street Real World Business Solutions Ltd; SME -fast experience of processing and how business works John Beech University of Nottingham; Division of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics. Protein / insect expertise and conscience of the group Jo Gould Federal Polytechnic Oko; Department of Food Technology, Networked across Anambra State Mary Okpala Jo Mary me
  39. 39. Work packages 8 Management6Choose some materials Chemically and functionally assess the materials Make Product prototypes Assess prototypes How can this be made commercially viable?
  40. 40. 10/07/2020 Milestone One: Choice of materials and their supply 9 Starchy material ready to be sent to UK Target starch materials: Maize Cassava Millet Sorghum Bambara Pigeon pea Cowpea Target insects: Palm weevil Grass Hopper Cricket
  41. 41. 10/07/2020 Review : Check : Standardise : Plan Keeping going 10 • Regular meeting at the same time each week • An agenda for each meeting • List of action points for each meeting q Understand and establish what we need for a supply chain for insects q Design and commission modifications to capital equipment to ease its use for making the product q Create a knowledge base of food products, both in Nigeria and UK/EU q Build our contacts
  42. 42. Review and understand Insect farming in a controlled environment EXTINCTION ALLERGENICITY MICROBIOLOGICAL SAFETYANTI-NUTRIENTS ATAXIC SYNDROME PESTICIDES / INSECTICIDES HEAVY METALS ……..depends on insect species, diet and habitat10 Safety aspects Known traceable supply chain Consistent quality Predictable supply Scaleable operations Known and controlled: environmental impact threats to local fauna and flora
  43. 43. 10/07/2020 Local knowledge of Palm weevil collection 12 Palm weevil collection is interwoven with palm wine farming The dead/wounded raffia palm tree are the natural habitat of palm weevil
  44. 44. 10/07/2020 Preparing for creation of our own cricket farm with the help of Dr Ikechukwu Onah (University of Nigeria Nsukka (UNN) in Enugu State ) 13 1. Check on availability of farmed insects for human consumption 2. Major review of what were best choices for the exemplar farm 3. Agreements for costs and objectives 4. Creation of HACCP plan for insect supply
  45. 45. 10/07/2020 Review : Check : Standardise : Plan 14 q Understand and establish what we need for a supply chain for insects q Design and commission modifications to capital equipment to ease its use for making the product q Create a knowledge base of food products, both in Nigeria and UK/EU q Build our contacts q Plan the prototypes q Devise consumer testing Is it safe, is it sustainable, is it sensible?

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