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DEALING WITH CLIENT<br />Represent how an Interior Designer relate <br />to their client… And the relationship between the...
“ The relationships between interior designers and the clients who ask us<br /> to help them make their homes and offices ...
How to successfully relate <br />or deal to clients.<br />    The relation should : <br />		- Human one.<br />		- Intense....
    The Basics Facts of a Designer's Life<br />   At the beginning of every job, you will quickly discover three very basi...
An environment in which client will be comfortable.<br />First ,   you want to design a room that functions in a way that ...
Ask Questions before designing<br />How big is their family?<br />    What are their profession?<br />    How old they are...
we've been discussing how to ask questions of your clients---<br /> you need to get a sense of the activities that take pl...
  What about reading, deskwork, television viewing and other home entertainment interests, and musical instruments?
 Where are their computers located in the house? Are they in the right places?
  Does anyone in the house have a hobby that requires the right activity space?
 Is there exercise equipment that needs a place?
  What about games? If either of ur client play cards on a regular basis, how should you plan for that pastime? What rooms...
  Do ur client want to make some adjustments?
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Dealing with Client ( A Relationship between client and interior designer)

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Dealing with Client ( A Relationship between client and interior designer)

  1. 1. DEALING WITH CLIENT<br />Represent how an Interior Designer relate <br />to their client… And the relationship between them…<br />
  2. 2. “ The relationships between interior designers and the clients who ask us<br /> to help them make their homes and offices both functional and beautiful.<br />Happily, one of the joys of being an interior designer is having <br />opportunities to meet interesting, successful people<br /> and becoming intimately involved in their lives.”<br /> Communication skills <br /> Honest<br /> Trust<br />
  3. 3. How to successfully relate <br />or deal to clients.<br /> The relation should : <br /> - Human one.<br /> - Intense.<br /> - Personal.<br /> Listen carefully.<br /> Understand what they want.<br /> Give value to their decision.<br /> Give total attention.<br /> Be clear and focused.<br /> Be sincere and timely. <br />Be Patient with ur Explanations.<br /> Give advice when needed.<br /> Avoid jargons.<br /> Keep it professional. <br />
  4. 4. The Basics Facts of a Designer's Life<br /> At the beginning of every job, you will quickly discover three very basic facts of life:<br />When you first discuss a design job with the clients, <br /> they rarely know what they want.<br /> If, in your initial meetings, they do tell you what they want, the chances are that you will end up - with their blessings - doing something completely different.<br /> Most clients will eventually spend more - sometimes, <br /> considerably more - than they initially state to be <br /> their absolute top budget.<br />
  5. 5. An environment in which client will be comfortable.<br />First , you want to design a room that functions in a way that satisfies their lifestyle.<br />Second, you want to design a room that expresses a mood in which they will feel comfortable.<br />Third, you want to create an environment in which all the elements fit together in harmony <br />with one another and with the rest of the house.<br />
  6. 6. Ask Questions before designing<br />How big is their family?<br /> What are their profession?<br /> How old they are? <br /> How old are the children?<br /> Do they have pets? <br /> Are their overnight guest?<br /> What they do at leisure time?<br /> What kind of house they need?<br /> What are their domestic Routine? <br /> Is their style at home formal or informal?<br /> What is the approximate age of the home?<br /> What activities are being done in the different rooms?<br />
  7. 7. we've been discussing how to ask questions of your clients---<br /> you need to get a sense of the activities that take place in the home. In addition to eating and sleeping,<br /><ul><li> what else do the members of the family do on a regular basis? Is there a home office, and if so, who uses it?
  8. 8. What about reading, deskwork, television viewing and other home entertainment interests, and musical instruments?
  9. 9. Where are their computers located in the house? Are they in the right places?
  10. 10. Does anyone in the house have a hobby that requires the right activity space?
  11. 11. Is there exercise equipment that needs a place?
  12. 12. What about games? If either of ur client play cards on a regular basis, how should you plan for that pastime? What rooms to these activities currently take place in?
  13. 13. Do ur client want to make some adjustments?
  14. 14. What about dining? Is there a dining room? How often does the family eat together for breakfast, lunch and dinner?</li></li></ul><li>By asking the right questions, you force them to decide what they really want from the room you're designing. All often, the desire to decorate a room is a vague notion in the client's mind of the following sort: <br />"I know that I want the room to look different from before, but I'm not sure what I want." Or, "I know what I want but I'm not sure how to put it together.“<br />In reality, is that they don't know what they want. In fact, that's why they've called you in. They expect you to help them decide what they want, or perhaps decide for them.<br />
  15. 15. Your Attitude is Important<br />Don’t be afraid to say "no"<br />Create a work process<br />Get "preemptive" feedback<br />Be timely<br />Accept your worth.<br />Don’t accept sob stories.<br />Don’t work for promises.<br />The Secret to a Successful Interview<br /> Establish a relaxed, cordial, friendly atmosphere.<br /> Don't just start to pepper them with questions.<br /> Sit down with them where they're comfortable.<br /> Talk as friends. <br />
  16. 16. Does your client really intend to use that little room as a sewing room, or <br /> is she more likely to sit in it and watch TV?<br /> Does your client really intend to use the room as his quiet den, or will he <br /> really be sharing it with his wife, kids?<br /> Will they really be comfortable with a cozy rest-your-feet-on-any-chair <br /> type of living room? <br />As you can see, u’ve got to play the role of psychologist/counselor<br />as well as designer because you have to fulfill not only<br /> your clients needs but also their dreams. <br />
  17. 17. Budgetary Issues<br />Now it's time to investigate how budgets work, how clients think about them, and how you should discuss this sensitive topic with your clients.<br /><ul><li> First off, charge your clients fairly.
  18. 18. Develop your pricing model, stick to it, and be transparent about it.
  19. 19. Be clear in all your proposals and documentation.
  20. 20. Avoid blindly speculating on cost
  21. 21. Announce all anticipated costs up front.
  22. 22. Identify Scope Creep Immediately</li></li></ul><li>Working with Clients<br />Once your plan has been presented, it's often best to include in all discussions the words “ we “ and “ our “:"After we get our plans finalized," "After we get our budget set," and so on.<br />This freely-taken intimacy provides the basis for a positive client-designer relationship that is permeated with warmth and trust. You're both in this together, and you both have a personal stake in the outcome of this mutual investment. It's going to represent your abilities as a designer, and that's something that you don't take lightly. So, a subliminal way for you to express your commitment to the project is to use the terms “ we " and “ our " when referring to it. This sets the stage for the close client-designer relationship you want to establish.<br />
  23. 23. A designer, no matter how talented, can't always get the desired results because sometimes there is resistance or maybe a lack of understanding on the part of the client. I think it is the designer's job to work as a guide, to bring out the best qualities and the best attitudes.<br />Thank You<br />Yamini Soni<br />1st Year Batch (I. D.)<br />

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