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@SimonTanner
Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre
How understanding context,
indicators and strategic direction
can make an impact no...
Mirror: understanding context
Signal: choosing your indicators
Manoeuvre: deciding strategic direction
& values
Mirror, Si...
www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/
@kingsdh
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp4y-_VoXdA
Digital Humanities methods for historical analysis of
Irish Immigrants in 19th ...
Reason 1: digital humanities digital
research resources are
recognised
Reason 2: digital humanities
enhances the research
...
Digital Ecosystem
There is a defined resource that is made up of a describable, cohesive set of primary and
secondary mate...
www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
@SimonTanner
What are your Assumptions?
Assumptions are a problem when you do not openly signal them.
Some examples of problematic assu...
Signalling your Direction, Testing your Assumptions,
Measuring what you can Know
An indicator is merely a piece of informa...
@SimonTanner
academicbookfuture.org/2015/09/20/investigating-the-ref2014-as-another-means-of-understanding-academic-books/
REF 2014: Comparing Modern Languages, English & History
Modern Languages
& Linguistics
English Language
& Literature
Histo...
REF 2014: Looking at Unit of Assessment 29:
English Language and Literature
 2220 Books in the following output types
 A...
REF 2014: Looking at Unit of Assessment 29:
English Language and Literature
A: Authored Books = 313 Publishers
 There are...
Manoeuvre: Planning for Impact
@SimonTanner
@SimonTanner@SimonTanner
The Balanced Value Impact Model
Available at: www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
“the measurable outcomes arising from the existence of a digital
resource that demonstrate a change in the life or life op...
The Attention Economy
We will compete:
– for attention,
– for eyeballs on our collections and resources,
– for time and en...
How many photos have ever been taken?
http://blog.1000memories.com/94-number-of-photos-ever-taken-digital-and-analog-in-sh...
The Economics of Digitisation
European museums house >485 million photographs
Library collections > 34 million
Archives > ...
Impact: Cause and Effect
@SimonTanner
www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
@SimonTanner
We are more effective and efficient in delivering change and
tangible benefits (Internal Impact);
Our organisation is gain...
Avoiding the car crash:
some thoughts
@SimonTanner
© JAlbum & Mark's Chameleon
STANDARDS!
You happy Polly?
@SimonTanner
“Michelle Pickover, curator of manuscripts at the
University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa,
argues that ‘Cyberspace...
How do we genuinely offer democratisation in a
digital domain when people are struggling to:
Be
Belong
Build identity
Be R...
Telecrofting: Volunteer benefits high
Shetland Isles Museum and Archives
http://photos.shetland-museum.org.uk/
Volunteers ...
Crowdsourcing Value Chain
= Task / Utility Oriented
Benefits = entertainment,
passing the time,
low level skills built
Tas...
Challenge – find your telecrofters
If crowdsourcing is so great why are there so few projects?
Volunteers have a much high...
Is the value in
the wine, the glass or the drinking?
@SimonTanner
Vote on Twitter with the hashtag:
Wine/Content = #dcdc15wine
Glass/Infrastructure = #dcdc15glass
Drinking/Access = #dcdc15...
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Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre How  understanding context, indicators and strategic direction can make an impact not a car crash.

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Keynote presentation given to the Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities DCDC2015 Conference, October 2015, Manchester.
#dcdc15
DCDC (Discovering Collections, Discovering Communities) is a collaborative conference hosted by The National Archives and RLUK that explores inter-disciplinary, cross-sector approaches and opportunities to developing and widening access to the wealth of our collections through partnership and collaborative working, across the heritage, cultural and academic sectors.

Published in: Education
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Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre How  understanding context, indicators and strategic direction can make an impact not a car crash.

  1. 1. @SimonTanner Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre How understanding context, indicators and strategic direction can make an impact not a car crash. Simon Tanner Digital Humanities, King’s College London Twitter: @SimonTanner 13/10/2015 23:14 ENC Public Talk 19 February 2013 1 © JAlbum & Mark's Chameleon
  2. 2. Mirror: understanding context Signal: choosing your indicators Manoeuvre: deciding strategic direction & values Mirror, Signal, Manoeuvre @SimonTanner
  3. 3. www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/ @kingsdh
  4. 4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp4y-_VoXdA Digital Humanities methods for historical analysis of Irish Immigrants in 19th Century London, England
  5. 5. Reason 1: digital humanities digital research resources are recognised Reason 2: digital humanities enhances the research environment Reason 3: digital humanities has impact 3 Reasons to say YES to DH http://simon-tanner.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/3-reasons-ref2014-was-good-for-digital.html @SimonTanner
  6. 6. Digital Ecosystem There is a defined resource that is made up of a describable, cohesive set of primary and secondary materials, services, products and activities. The resource is accessed primarily through a digital platform (web, mobile, or other means). The content within the resource is digital in nature There is a definable group of users that the resource is intended to reach by digital means. The resource does not have to stand alone, it could be part of a wider set of activities, products, or services Mirror: Understanding Context @SimonTanner
  7. 7. www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html @SimonTanner
  8. 8. What are your Assumptions? Assumptions are a problem when you do not openly signal them. Some examples of problematic assumptions: “digitisation = democratisation” “my digital environment = my communities environment” “Digital is everything today: if we build it, they will come!” “Planning is so 20th Century, let’s be Agile!” “Money is the primary trade worth having with our community” Signal: Indicators @SimonTanner
  9. 9. Signalling your Direction, Testing your Assumptions, Measuring what you can Know An indicator is merely a piece of information that indicates something useful to you. Indicators are clues to answering questions not absolute answers. Make them SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Timebound Focus the indicators on measuring change and choose as few indicators as possible Don’t overclaim – indicators can easily create a false impression or provide an incentive to do disruptive or counter-productive actions. Signal: Indicators @SimonTanner "Where is the Life we have lost in living? Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?“ T.S.Elliot
  10. 10. @SimonTanner academicbookfuture.org/2015/09/20/investigating-the-ref2014-as-another-means-of-understanding-academic-books/
  11. 11. REF 2014: Comparing Modern Languages, English & History Modern Languages & Linguistics English Language & Literature History Initial draft data – subject to change © Simon Tanner, 2015
  12. 12. REF 2014: Looking at Unit of Assessment 29: English Language and Literature  2220 Books in the following output types  Authored Books (1684),  Edited Books (397) and  Scholarly Editions (139)  385 unique Publishers found Initial draft data – subject to change © Simon Tanner, 2015 29: English Language & literature: A: Authored Books Publishers The shape of the data is a Long Tail
  13. 13. REF 2014: Looking at Unit of Assessment 29: English Language and Literature A: Authored Books = 313 Publishers  There are 23 Publishers with more than 10 books submitted  Top 10 most used Publishers = 835 books or ~49%  267 Publishers had 5 or fewer books submitted  178 Publishers had one book submitted  59 Publishers are a University Press. Initial draft data – subject to change © Simon Tanner, 2015 158 Palgrave Macmillan 130 Oxford University Press 124 Cambridge University Press 81 Edinburgh University Press 76 Routledge 64 Ashgate 60 Bloomsbury Publishing 56 Continuum 47 Manchester University Press 39 Faber & Faber 26 Liverpool University Press 25 Jonathan Cape 25 Picador 24 Salt Publishing 23 Carcanet Press 21 Penguin Books 18 Peter Lang 18 Seren 18 University of Wales Press 16 Wiley Blackwell 13 Shearsman Books 12 Bloodaxe Books 11 Pickering & Chatto
  14. 14. Manoeuvre: Planning for Impact @SimonTanner
  15. 15. @SimonTanner@SimonTanner The Balanced Value Impact Model Available at: www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html
  16. 16. “the measurable outcomes arising from the existence of a digital resource that demonstrate a change in the life or life opportunities of the community” www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html @SimonTanner
  17. 17. The Attention Economy We will compete: – for attention, – for eyeballs on our collections and resources, – for time and energy from our communities. @SimonTanner
  18. 18. How many photos have ever been taken? http://blog.1000memories.com/94-number-of-photos-ever-taken-digital-and-analog-in-shoebox Totality of Analog photography is roughly 3 Trillion Photos Approx. 250 billion photos have been uploaded to Facebook, and roughly 350 million photos are uploaded every day World’s largest photographic repositories @SimonTanner
  19. 19. The Economics of Digitisation European museums house >485 million photographs Library collections > 34 million Archives > 8.3 million Approximately 90% of the photographic record is recorded as orphaned “Based on 8.64m photographs (30% of the total estimated un-digitised holdings)... can estimate the total cost range between €14m and €19.44m to digitise 8.64m photographs across European libraries. “ “of all of our estimates, this one is perhaps prone to the greatest margin of error “ The Cost of Digitising Europe’s Cultural Heritage A Report for the Comité des Sages of the European Commission Prepared by Nick Poole, the Collections Trust November 2010 http://nickpoole.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/digiti_report.pdf @SimonTanner
  20. 20. Impact: Cause and Effect @SimonTanner
  21. 21. www.kdcs.kcl.ac.uk/innovation/impact.html @SimonTanner
  22. 22. We are more effective and efficient in delivering change and tangible benefits (Internal Impact); Our organisation is gaining strategic advantage through the innovation inherent in this digital activity (Innovation Impact); We are delivering a strong economic benefit to our community that demonstrate the worth and value of our endeavours in clear monetary terms (Economic Impact); and the community has been changed by the resource in beneficial ways that can be clearly identified (Social Impact) What does success look like? @SimonTanner
  23. 23. Avoiding the car crash: some thoughts @SimonTanner © JAlbum & Mark's Chameleon
  24. 24. STANDARDS! You happy Polly? @SimonTanner
  25. 25. “Michelle Pickover, curator of manuscripts at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, argues that ‘Cyberspace is not an uncontested domain. The digital medium contains an ideological base – it is a site of struggle.’ The real challenges in collection digitisation in national memory institutions, she argues, are not technological or technical but social and political. Librarians and archivists are ‘agents of social change’ who, through their appraisal, selection, arrangement and retention of material, are able to become active participants in the production of social memory, and who, by the nature of their work, cannot help but ‘privilege certain narratives and silence or marginalise others’ Kahn, R and Tanner, S (2014) Building Futures: The Role of Digital Collections in Shaping National Identity in Africa (chapter in African Studies in the Digital Age) Democratisation & Contested Spaces @SimonTanner
  26. 26. How do we genuinely offer democratisation in a digital domain when people are struggling to: Be Belong Build identity Be Recognised Believed Understood Understand Heard Democratisation & Contested Spaces @SimonTanner
  27. 27. Telecrofting: Volunteer benefits high Shetland Isles Museum and Archives http://photos.shetland-museum.org.uk/ Volunteers trained to very high explicit skill levels Extremely high community engagement Task achieved but its success was defined by the community not just the museum @SimonTanner
  28. 28. Crowdsourcing Value Chain = Task / Utility Oriented Benefits = entertainment, passing the time, low level skills built Task completion & thus crowdsourcing host is key beneficiary Marginal benefits but high volumes reached @SimonTanner
  29. 29. Challenge – find your telecrofters If crowdsourcing is so great why are there so few projects? Volunteers have a much higher engagement, develop a much higher skills base and thus see more chance their lives can be changed in beneficial ways Personalise the crowd, reach out to individuals, build genuine relationships and listen The task is not everything – look beyond mere utility Crowdsourcing is Dead: Long Live Citizen Humanities! http://simon-tanner.blogspot.co.uk/2015/09/crowdsourcing-is-dead-long-live-citizen.html @SimonTanner
  30. 30. Is the value in the wine, the glass or the drinking? @SimonTanner
  31. 31. Vote on Twitter with the hashtag: Wine/Content = #dcdc15wine Glass/Infrastructure = #dcdc15glass Drinking/Access = #dcdc15drink Results after lunch today, cheers! Your Vote: Is the value in the wine, the glass or the drinking? @SimonTanner

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