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A Glance at the Future - the Image as Dr Who's TARDIS

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Simon Tanner of King's College London gives a presentation on the future of high resolution images using JPEG2000 and uses the Dr Who TARDIS as a thematic idea as the TARDIS is bigger on the inside than the outside (just like a JPEG2000 image).
Given at Current Trends and Future Directions for Digital Imaging in Libraries and Archives
10/11/2014, Wellcome Trust - London
http://www.dpconline.org/events/details/83-JP2000

Published in: Technology
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A Glance at the Future - the Image as Dr Who's TARDIS

  1. 1. A Glance at the Future – the Image as Dr Who’s TARDIS Simon Tanner Director of Digital Consulting Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London Twitter: @SimonTanner 11/11/2014 11:27 ENC Public Talk 19 February 2013 1
  2. 2. Digital Humanities: www.kcl.ac.uk/ddh/ the application of digital technology to humanities disciplines reflection upon the impact of digital media upon humanity > 50 academics & researchers ~ £2.5 million research income per annum >5 million digital objects, 130+projects: mostly JPEG2000 200+million hits over 5 years: 2009-2013
  3. 3. A Glance at the Future “Trying to predict the future is a mug's game. But increasingly it's a game we all have to play because the world is changing so fast and we need to have some sort of idea of what the future's actually going to be like because we are going to have to live there, probably next week.” Douglas Adams, The Salmon of Doubt “ things can change so abruptly, so violently, so profoundly, that futures like our grandparents’ have insufficient ‘now’ to stand on. We have no future because our present is too volatile. We have only... the spinning of the given moment's scenarios. Pattern recognition.” William Gibson, Pattern Recognition
  4. 4. © BBC
  5. 5. Needs becoming clearer The ever increasing spatial, spectral and temporal resolution of remotely sensed imagery data sets means that fast decompression of remote sensed data is very important. The ever increasing volume of digitised content to be stored, managed and curated means that compression is essential to sustainability. Medical, biometric and defence applications are driving significant innovation. An increasing demand from image consumers for sophisticated interfaces with high resolution or high performance imagery.
  6. 6. Things less clear Wholesale adoption in face of entrenched market positions? Ability to become a simpler format to use – especially regarding compression decisions? Ability to serve all interface technologies? Ability to serve non-high bit rate IP networks? Error resilience? Scalability, scalability, scalability?
  7. 7. Opposing tensions? “we live with a rate of change so high, that if you understand something today that means it must already, by definition, be obsolete. James Burke, Connections, Episode 10, "Yesterday, Tomorrow and You“ “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” Arthur C Clarke, Hazards of Prophecy: The Failure of Imagination
  8. 8. Think inside the box! because it’s bigger on the inside Simon Tanner Director of Digital Consulting Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London Twitter: @SimonTanner 11/11/2014 11:27 ENC Public Talk 19 February 2013 8

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