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Crow Wing Energized 2017 Workplace Wellness presentation

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Crow Wing Energized held the 1st annual Workplace Wellness conference in Brainerd November of 2017. View the presenter slides.

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Crow Wing Energized 2017 Workplace Wellness presentation

  1. 1. WELCOME Breakfast & Registration 7:30 am – 7:45 am
  2. 2. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Crow Wing Energized 1st Annual Workplace Wellness Conference Adam Rees Crow Wing Energized Co-Chair Essentia Health Central President
  3. 3. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Time Topic Presenter 7:30 – 7:45 Breakfast & Registration 7:45 – 8:00 Welcome Introduction and WHY Workplace Wellness Adam Rees – Essentia Health Central President 8:00 – 8:30 Keynote Speaker Stefan Gingerich – StayWell 1-Minute Exercise 8:30 – 9:15 Stress Reduction & Resiliency Building Community Leaders 9:15 – 9:25 BREAK 9:25 – 9:40 Tobacco Reduction Community Leaders 1-Minute Exercise 9:40 – 10:15 Active Living Promotion Community Leaders 1-Minute Exercise 10:15 – 10:35 Breastfeeding Promotion Community Leaders 1-Minute Exercise 10:35 – 11:15 Healthy Eating Promotion Community Leaders 11:15 – 11:25 Wrap Up Stefan Gingerich – StayWell 11:25 – 11:30 Partner Cards & Next Steps Cassie Carey
  4. 4. E N E R G I Z E I have had a least one serving of fruit today. I saw someone stand during the meeting today. We did a one minute physical activity break during the meeting. I saw someone check their cell phone. I have a workplace wellness policy at my place of work. I read the Brainerd Dispatch this morning. I have attended a goal group for Crow Wing Energized other than workplace wellness. I have visited the Crow Wing Energized Webpage. This is my first Crow Wing Energized Conference/ Meeting I have attended. I have heard the word “partnership” used today. Someone in this room is wearing glasses. I learned on thing new that I can use within my workplace. The Crow Wing Energized Workplace Wellness Toolkit was introduced to the group. I listened to the radio while traveling to this conference. I have received one business card or contact information during this meeting. I have subscribed for the Crow Wing Energized Newsletter off of the webpage. I saw someone bring coffee or tea this morning. I have received a grant from Crow Wing Energized in the past. Someone left the room before break time. This is not my first Crow Wing Energized Conference/Meetin g I have attended. I have attended a monthly meeting for the CWE Workplace Wellness Goal Group I met one new contact at today’s conference. I wrote something I’m grateful for and placed it on the Attitude of Gratitude Tree. I have healthy vending options/ healthy snack options within my workplace. I got at least seven hours of sleep last night. The Crow Wing Energized Workplace Wellness Toolkit was introduced to the group. Someone in the room has a FitBit on. My workplace has a workplace wellness group to oversee implementing healthy projects, activities, and strategies. I work for a small business (20 employees or less). Cassie Carey, CWE Coordinator, has presented to the group. I have been physically active within the last 24- hours. I have a standing desk within my workplace. I have a workplace wellness policy at my place of work. I have attended a monthly meeting for the CWE Workplace Wellness Goal Group. Someone has their computer/tablet out at the conference. My workplace has a breastfeeding room for new moms in the workplace to come back to work. Someone in the room brought their own water bottle. I have liked the NEW Crow Wing Energized Facebook Page. I have attended or facilitated a Lifestyle Change Class/ NDPP Class. I work for a large/medium size business (more than 20 employees).
  5. 5. Crow Wing Energized Mission To improve the health and wellness of Crow Wing County residents by engaging formal and informal community leaders so the healthy choice becomes the easy choice.
  6. 6. Guiding Principles • We seek to create and sustain a united approach to improving health and wellness in our community and surrounding area. • We seek collaboration towards solutions with multiple stakeholders (e.g. schools, worksites, medical center) to improve community engagement and commitment focused on improving community health. • We seek to prioritize evidence based efforts around the greatest community good that can be achieved through our available resources.
  7. 7. Adam Rees Kara Griffin Cassie Carey Kathy Sell Joanna Collins Mark Ostgarden Essentia Health Crow Wing County Crow Wing Energized Essentia Health Brainerd Family YMCA City of Brainerd Brian Lehman Matt Killian Nathan Bertram Tom Gonzalez Gayle Nielsen Lehman & Associates Brainerd Lakes Chamber Crow Wing County Pointway Church Essentia Health Robin Loftis Paulette Thoennes Laine Larson Carolyn McQueen Renee Richardson Mara Larson CLOW Stamping CTC Brainerd Public Schools University of Minnesota Extension Brainerd Dispatch Heartland Hospice Steering Committee Members
  8. 8. Co-Chairs: Robin Loftis, CLOW Stamping Loftis@clowstamping.com Paulette Thoennes, CTC Paulette.Thoennes@connectctc.com Purpose: To create a healthy and energized workforce. Workplace Wellness Goal Group
  9. 9. Cassie Carey Crow Wing Energized Coordinator
  10. 10. Keynote Speaker Stefan Gingerich StayWell
  11. 11. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Presented By Why Worksite Well-Being? 11/8/2017 Senior Research Analyst Stefan Gingerich
  12. 12. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Overview 15 11/8/2017Why Worksite Well-Being?
  13. 13. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Why are we here today? Evidence for promoting healthy habits for employees Financial reasons “People” reasons Music Break How do we do that? Preparing the workplace Policy, System, Environment changes A challenge for you today 16 11/8/2017 “Good health is good business.” But sometimes we need proof. Why Worksite Well-Being?
  14. 14. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Why Worksite Well-Being? Financial Reasons Why Worksite Well-Being?17 11/8/2017
  15. 15. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Health Behaviors ►►►Health Costs Sources: Goetzel, et al. 1998; Goetzel, et al. 2012; White, et al. 2013 18 11/8/2017 Why Worksite Well-Being? 57% 32% 25% 25% 19% 15% 13% 7% -4% -9% PercentdifferencefromLowRisk High Risk Health Category
  16. 16. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Health Behaviors ►►►Productivity Loss Source: Riedel, et al. 2009. 19 11/8/2017 Why Worksite Well-Being? 194% 123% 91% 31% 23% 14% 9% Back Pain Depression Stress Physical activity Tobacco Weight Alcohol PercentdifferencefromLowerRisk Higher Risk Health Category
  17. 17. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by 15-37% Healthy behaviors mean lower likelihood of absence Merrill, et al. 2013 Why Worksite Well-Being? Health is associated with all of these financial issues as well. Absence $493 $490 $657 $667 Biometrics Emotional health Annual Payments Low risk Short-Term Disability Overweight/Obes e workers: 26% to 45% More likely to have on-the-job injuries. Gu, et al. 2016 Accidents 11/8/2017 Goetzel, et al. 2009.
  18. 18. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Why Worksite Well-Being? People Reasons Why Worksite Well-Being?21 11/8/2017
  19. 19. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by 0.35 0.33 0.32 0.23 0.15 0.08 - 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 Depression General Mental Health Anxiety Subjective physical illness CV disease Musculoskeletal Correlationcoefficient Why Worksite Well-Being?22 Strong correlation between health, well-being, and job satisfaction 11/8/2017 Faragher, et al. The relationship between job satisfaction and health: a meta-analysis. http://oem.bmj.com/content/62/2/105
  20. 20. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by What’s important to employees when considering whether to take a new job? 1. The ability to do what they do best 2. Greater work-life balance and better personal well-being 3. Greater stability and job security 4. A significant increase in income 5. The opportunity to work for a company with a great brand or reputation Why Worksite Well-Being?23 Well-being benefits can attract and retain employees. 53% of employees say a role that allows greater work-life balance and better personal well-being is “very important” to them. 11/8/2017 Gallup. State of the American Workplace, February 2017.
  21. 21. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Why Worksite Well-Being?24 APA survey: Feeling valued at work was associated with motivation and work engagement 11/8/2017 93% 88% 33% 38% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Motivated to do their best work Feel engaged Feel valued Don't feel valued http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2012/03/well-being.aspx
  22. 22. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Musical Interlude Why Worksite Well-Being?25 11/8/2017
  23. 23. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. How do we start? 26 11/8/2017Why Worksite Well-Being?
  24. 24. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by CDC scorecard – Focus on science-based program implementation – Online tutorials and guides – Free! HERO scorecard – Regularly updated by industry experts – Benchmarking reports – Free! Devote some time Involve your co-workers There are lots of tools you can use to help you change Why Worksite Well-Being?27 11/8/2017
  25. 25. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Issues 38 days in, still adjusting Long-standing client calls or other meetings with many people Call center staffing: How do you maintain service levels? “too much work to do” 30-minutes of well-being time Why Worksite Well-Being?28 11/8/2017 Solutions • Managers need to be on-board • Staggered breaks in call-center • Re-prioritize: Is the benefit of 30- minute break greater than the work that can be done during that time? • If/when everyone else takes a break, some work has to wait 30 minutes
  26. 26. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Policy System Environment Why Worksite Well-Being?29 11/8/2017
  27. 27. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Why Worksite Well-Being?30 Some are good. Others aren’t. Usually they require many people. 11/8/2017 Considerations: • Unintended consequences • What will make or break the policy? • Who needs to have a voice? • How is this likely to be used or abused?
  28. 28. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Why Worksite Well-Being?31 Policies only work if you use them appropriately. 11/8/2017
  29. 29. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Why Worksite Well-Being?32 Also called “built environment,” these are physical resources that encourage or discourage certain activities. 11/8/2017 Environment Walking spaces Healthy food available Stress break room Mother’s room No smoking signs
  30. 30. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Take a walk? 33 11/8/2017 Why Worksite Well-Being?
  31. 31. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Take a walk? 34 11/8/2017 Why Worksite Well-Being?
  32. 32. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Everyone loves a challenge 35 11/8/2017Why Worksite Well-Being?
  33. 33. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Talk to my boss about taking a walk every day. Ask the facilities person about repurposing an empty office. Plan a healthy meal for a lunch meeting Talk to my team about 10 minute walk before each team meeting Familiarize yourself with benefits information, e.g. 401k, EAP Write down 3 things that you’re going to do as soon as you get back to your workplace. Today you’re going to hear from people like you who are improving the well-being of their workplace. They have lots of ideas. Many of them can be used in your workplace, or can be modified slightly to work for you. Write down 3 of them that you can do tomorrow. Why Worksite Well-Being?36 11/8/2017
  34. 34. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by American Psychological Association. Stress in the Workplace Survey, 2012. http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2012/03/well- being.aspx Faragher, et al. The relationship between job satisfaction and health: a meta-analysis. Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2005;62:105-112. http://oem.bmj.com/content/62/2/105 Gallup. State of the American Workplace. Feb 2017. Goetzel R, et al. The relationship between modifiable health risks and health care expenditures. An analysis of the multi- employer HERO health risk and cost database. JOEM. 1998. 40(10):843-54. Goetzel 2009 Goetzel R, et al. Ten modifiable health risk factors are linked to more than one-fifth of employer-employee health care spending. Health Affairs. 2012. 31(11):2474-84. Why Worksite Well-Being?37 11/8/2017
  35. 35. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Gu J, et al. Prevalence of work-site injuries and relationship between obesity and injury among U.S. workers: NHIS 2004–2012. J of Safety Research. 2016. 58:21-30. Merrill R, et al. Self-Rated Job Performance and Absenteeism According to Employee Engagement, Health Behaviors, and Physical Health. JOEM. 2013. 55(1):10-18. Riedel J, et al. Use of a normal impairment factor in quantifying avoidable productivity loss because of poor health. JOEM. 2009. 51(3):283-95. White J, et al. A more generalizable method to evaluate the association between commonly reported health risks and health care expenditures among employers of all sizes. JOEM. 2013. 55(10):1179-85. Why Worksite Well-Being?38 11/8/2017
  36. 36. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by ©2017 The StayWell Company, LLC. All rights reserved. Thank you! Please contact me with any questions. Stefan Gingerich sgingerich@staywell.com 39 11/8/2017Why Worksite Well-Being?
  37. 37. Stress Reduction & Resiliency Building Did you know: Mental Health Conditions such as depression or anxiety are impacting 1 out of 4 adults in Crow Wing County.
  38. 38. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by in the Workplace Adverse Childhood Experiences
  39. 39. Adverse Childhood Experiences What is An adverse childhood experience (ACE) describes a traumatic experience in a person’s life occurring before the age of 18.
  40. 40. Who here has gone to school?
  41. 41. Who here has gone to school?
  42. 42. By making school a priority in childhood, as a society, we’re saying that what happens to us in childhood can influence who we are later in life. Following that same line of thinking…
  43. 43. …it’s the good experiences and the adverse experiences that can influence us throughout our lives.
  44. 44. Why is that important?
  45. 45. Bad choice Good choice It’s not as simple as good choice or bad choice… other factors influence how we view the world and the choices we make
  46. 46. An adverse childhood experience (ACE) describes a traumatic experience in a person’s life occurring before the age of 18.
  47. 47. Swear at you, insult you, put you down, or humiliate you? Unwanted sexual touch Hit you hard enough to leave marks Feel that none of the adults in your family love you or think you are special Not have enough to eat of adults were too loaded to take care of you A biological parent lost to divorce, abandonment, or other reason Your mother/stepmother was physically abused Live with someone who was a problem drinker or used hard street drugs A household member depressed or mentally ill. A household member attempted suicide. Household member went to jail * * * * * * * * * * ACE questions
  48. 48. 68%
  49. 49. Personal & Work
  50. 50. LINE THE BOTTOM How does this affect me and my business? ACEs not only lead to lifelong negative effects for the child who experiences them, but also creates a drain on businesses and taxpayers.
  51. 51. “The long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences on the workforce impose major human and economic costs that are preventable. These costs merit attention from the business community in conjunction with specialists in occupational medicine and public health.” One major study concludes:
  52. 52. Adverse Childhood Experiences Poor Worker Performance Relationship Problems • Marital • Family • Sexual Emotional Distress • Depressed mood • Panic reactions • Difficulty with anger Somatic Symptoms • Back pain • Headaches • Joint Problems Substance Abuse • Alcoholism • Smoking • Illicit drug use Areas of Health and Well-Being
  53. 53. Increased insurance premiums Increased absenteeism Increased distraction
  54. 54. help employees understand the root origins of their physical and emotional health concerns as being based in Adverse Childhood Experiences. help your company become trauma informed — meaning to understand how trauma (ACEs) affects a person, an effect that can be reversed once understood and treated.
  55. 55. What can be done?
  56. 56. What can be done?
  57. 57. What can be done? Attitude of Gratitude Attend/Host an ACE presentation 3 Good Things
  58. 58. ACEs 101 Ever wonder if what we experience in childhood makes an impact on us as adults? What about what our parents experienced? chronic neglect poverty caregiver in prison alcohol abuse drug abuse sexual abuse violence living with mental illness divorce emotional abuse Thursday, November 30th 3:00pm-5:00pm Essentia Health SJMC (Thabes 1)
  59. 59. Do you want to host ACEs 101 or a mini-ACE workshop at your workplace? See partner card in the left side of your packet!
  60. 60. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by AN ATTITUDE OF GRATITUDE Presented by: Ed Schulze and Beatrice Comty-Charnock, MA, LAMFT, LADC
  61. 61. Introductions Ed Schulze and Beatrice Comty-Charnock, members of Crow Wing Energized Mental Fitness Goal Group and co-founders of the “Attitude of Gratitude” Subcommittee
  62. 62. What is gratitude? Giving thanks to the universe is giving love, and what we give inevitably comes back to us.
  63. 63. GRATITUDE
  64. 64. Brain wiring 101: WHY IS PRACTICING GRATITUDE DIFFICULT?
  65. 65. The brain is like Velcro for negative experiences but Teflon for positive experiences. Versus
  66. 66. Synapses that fire together wire together
  67. 67. What Can We Do About Our Built-in Negativity?
  68. 68. Why Practice Gratitude?
  69. 69. Our happiness is no one’s responsibility but our own.
  70. 70. Don’t just take our word for it… the proof is in the research.
  71. 71. Gratitude is good for our bodies:
  72. 72. Grateful people sleep better:
  73. 73. Gratitude makes us more resilient.
  74. 74. Gratitude is good for kids.
  75. 75. Gratitude is good for schools.
  76. 76. An attitude of gratitude and resiliency-building has impacted over 12,000 plus community members by implementing simple strategies into their daily lives.
  77. 77. Tobacco Reduction Did you know: Nearly 1 out of 5 (18%) adults in Crow Wing County use tobacco • 70.8% of current cigarette smokers stopped smoking for 1 or more days in the past 12 months because they were trying to quit • More than half (58.2%) of adults who currently smoke only eat 0-2 total fruits and vegetables
  78. 78. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by LORD OF LIFE LUTHERAN CHURCH MY LOVED ONE, IT IS MY PRAYER THAT YOU MAY DO WELL IN ALL THINGS, AND BE HEALTHY IN BODY, EVEN AS YOUR SOUL DOES WELL. 3 JOHN 1:2 WELLNESS FOR STAFF AND OUR CONGREGATION INCLUSION OF STAFF AND PARISHINERS
  79. 79. Reasons for supporting tobacco cessation, reduction, and quitting efforts in the workplace!
  80. 80. TOBACCO EDUCATION AND CESSATION SUPPORT • Educational Demonstrations • One on One Assistance • Referrals • CO Breathalyzer
  81. 81. • Tobacco Cessation Specialists locally can assist in cessation support for your employees! • Quit Plan Mini Quits • Making Your Worksite Tobacco Free Tool (American Lung Association)
  82. 82. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  83. 83. A History of Tobacco Usage Brainerd Junior College 1938 - 1973 Brainerd Community College 1973 - 1991 Brainerd Staples Techincal College 1991 - 1995 Central Lakes College 1995 - Present
  84. 84. Brainerd Junior College Yearbook 1955
  85. 85. Brainerd Junior College Yearbook 1963
  86. 86. Brainerd Community College Newspaper 1976
  87. 87. Brainerd Junior College Newspaper December 17th, 1954
  88. 88. Where Are We Now? • No smoking within 100’ of the campus – 2010 • Designated Smoking Areas – 2011 • Completely Tobacco Free – 2015
  89. 89. Why Create a Tobacco Free Policy? • Help Smokers Quit • Lower Tobacco Initiation Rates • Reduce Health Risks • Reduce Employee Healthcare Costs • Increase Productivity • Reduce Litter
  90. 90. Are We There Yet? A 2013 campus wide survey shows that… • 35.2% of all students use some form of tobacco • 25% of all students use some form of tobacco daily • The campus is rated #2 in the top 5 places that students are exposed to tobacco each week
  91. 91. Next Steps…
  92. 92. Questions? Erich Heppner Director of Student Life Central Lakes College eheppner@clcmn.edu
  93. 93. Active Living Promotion Did you know: 2 out of 3 adults in Crow Wing County are not meeting the recommended 150 minutes moderate or vigorous physical activity recommendations
  94. 94. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by LuAnn Cameron & Jenny Seelen
  95. 95. MnSTEP - Stretching Together Employee Program  Office stretches routine (optional morning participation)  Field stretches routine (required morning participation)  Started in 2010
  96. 96. Benefits of Stretching
  97. 97. Pre-Stretching Stretches Incorporated Reduction # of injuries 35 19.5 44% Severity of injuries (lost time) 10 5.5 45% Recordable overexertion injuries 13 5 62% W/C costs $634,062 $337,018 47% Workers Compensation Cost/Benefit Analysis Per Year/Average
  98. 98. Other activities of our Wellness Committee
  99. 99.  Headwater at Itasca to Gulf of Mexico  Employees walked or exercised  Trek of 2,300 miles one way  Employees who participated – A Fit Bit Drawing
  100. 100. Now working on getting Fitness Center in our building • Through Crow Wing Energized Grant, obtained: • Stationery balls • Balance boards • Free weights • Yoga mat THANK YOU!!!!!
  101. 101. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Small Business Implementation Strategy: City of Pequot Lakes
  102. 102. Fitness Room at City Hall Wellness Program
  103. 103. Standing Desks CWE Workplace Wellness Grant Station
  104. 104. CWE Healthy Communities Grant
  105. 105. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  106. 106. Staff of The Center: David, Dawn, Connie Dave, Parker, Amanda and DeAnn
  107. 107. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Crow Wing Power Wellness Initiatives
  108. 108. Wellness Committee: Currently 4 employees What we do: • Meet once a month to discuss new ideas • Delegate projects • Find ways to make it easier for our employees to be healthier at work
  109. 109. Refrigerator with healthy options: • Cheese sticks • Fruit cups • Greek Yogurt • Meat & Cheese Packets • Nuts • Laughing Cow Cheese • Turkey sausage, egg white breakfast sandwiches on wheat bread • Etc. Wellness Bulletin Board: • Healthy tips • Gym coupons • Articles • Events Chili Day: • Healthier option for lunch
  110. 110. Other things we do: • Fruity Tuesday • Water Day • Gym Memberships Reimbursements • Recess at Work • Food Days (Chili, healthy sandwich, smoothie day) • Biggest Loser Challenge • Walking Trail • Giveaways such as stress balls, ChapStick®, sunscreen • Self-Defense Class • Monthly Newsletter • Lifestyle change class
  111. 111. Cubii: Under desk elliptical • Tracks calories, miles, strides • Has challenges you can set • Can challenge others • Keeps history Stand-up desk: • Promotes less sitting • Sitting is the new smoking • Easily adjustable and works for almost all heights New for 2017/2018
  112. 112. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by LORD OF LIFE LUTHERAN CHURCH MY LOVED ONE, IT IS MY PRAYER THAT YOU MAY DO WELL IN ALL THINGS, AND BE HEALTHY IN BODY, EVEN AS YOUR SOUL DOES WELL. 3 JOHN 1:2 WELLNESS FOR STAFF AND OUR CONGREGATION INCLUSION OF STAFF AND PARISHINERS
  113. 113. Falls Prevention Intro to Bone Builders Evidence based class offerings:
  114. 114. GO! Challenge for kids & families! Builds resiliency, incorporates healthy eating, exercise, care for mind and body
  115. 115. LET’S WALK!
  116. 116. Breastfeeding Promotion
  117. 117. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Missy Lake, RN, IBCLC, ICCE Essentia Health Prenatal Education & Lactation Services Coordinator Member of North Central Breastfeeding Network & Cass/Itasca Breastfeeding Coalition
  118. 118. The Business Case for Breastfeeding is a comprehensive program designed to educate employers about the value of supporting breastfeeding employees in the workplace.
  119. 119. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Supporting Breastfeeding is a WIN-WIN for Companies and Employees
  120. 120. If 90% of US families could comply with medical recommendations to breastfeed exclusively for 6 months, the United States would save $13 billion per year and prevent an excess 911 deaths (M. Bartick, MD, et al. http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/125/5/e1048.full.html)
  121. 121. • Employee retention • Less time off for child’s illnesses • Lower health care & insurance costs
  122. 122. • Basic needs for a lactation space • 4’ x 5’ space minimum • Chair and table or surface to place pump • Electrical outlet • Privacy – lock on door or signage • Access to water nearby (optional)
  123. 123. Support • Essentia Health Lactation Services • Crow Wing County WIC Programs • North Central Breastfeeding Network • Minnesota Breastfeeding Coalition, http://mnbreastfeedingcoalition.org/workplace/ • Business Case for Breastfeeding Toolkit, http://mchb.hrsa.gov/pregnancyandbeyond/breastfeeding/
  124. 124. Community support by family, friends, the workplace and the general public is essential for breastfeeding mothers. By working together we can meet the Healthy People 2020 goals, which benefits the enter community health wise, financially and environmentally. Erica Schmid, CLC WIC Breastfeeding Program Coordinator Member of the North Central Breastfeeding Network
  125. 125. I reached my goal!!! New goal….. Saving the world
  126. 126. The Center for Breastfeeding A major focus of THE HEALTHY CHILDREN PROJECT, INC. WIC currently has 4 Certified Lactation Counselors, certified through the Academy of Lactation Policy and Practice as well as two pending certifications. Thank you CWE/SHIP for sending Bethany and Rachel! This helps us to provide our families, communities and businesses with extra CLC support. All hands on deck!
  127. 127. Healthy People 2020 Goals Objective # Time 2020 Target Crow Wing County 2016 (Preliminary) MICH-21.1 Ever 81.9% 81.7% MICH-21.2 At 6 months 60.6% 23.9% MICH-21.3 At 1 year 34.1% Not available MICH-21.4 Excl. through 3 mo 46.2% Not available MICH-21.5 Excl. through 6 mo 25.5% Not available
  128. 128. What is the most common reason women stop breastfeeding???
  129. 129. It’s easy!!! Written Policy Support Time Education Place
  130. 130. CWC Community Services Lactation Room
  131. 131. • Simple Application • North Central Breastfeeding Network will assist you and provide you with the tools you need • CWE can provide up to $500 to help support starting a lactation room in your current space • Newsletter Announcement to promote the launch of your new program • Bonus!!! Win-Win. Great for business and great for families!
  132. 132. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Lactation Policy Implementation
  133. 133. Lactation Policy The purpose of this policy is to ensure that employees who have a need to express milk after the birth of a child may do so, as needed, in a safe, private environment.
  134. 134. Space requirements are actually quite simple: • Privacy – locking door • Comfortable chair and table • Electrical outlet • Small refrigerator
  135. 135.  1st of the month fruit  Subsidized healthy vending  Annual biometric screening  Walk-a-Mile Day  Bike to Work Day  Biggest Loser Contests  Lunch and Learns (CRMC)  Annual Health Fair (CRMC)  Drinking Water contest  Physical Therapist Visits  Chair Massage  Healthy Breakfast Days  Seat Belt Day  Safety/Ergonomics  Group mountain biking (summer) Other GPI Wellness Initiatives
  136. 136. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  137. 137. Healthy Eating Promotion Did you know: 2 out of 3 adults in Crow Wing County are not eating the recommended 5 or more fruits and vegetables a day
  138. 138. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by Deanna Olson Health and Wellness Coordinator-Just For Kix Alexa Hayes Health and Wellness Coordinator- Mills Fleet Farm Jackie Thurlow Community Health Specialist -Crow Wing Energized
  139. 139. •Evidence-Based Program •Community-based, lifestyle change program •Offers diabetes prevention education and support •Year-long program •1-Hour Sessions Lifestyle Change Program: National Diabetes Prevention Program
  140. 140. National Diabetes Prevention Program– Statistics for Central Region 93 132 402 485 # Participants Number of NDPP Participants 2014 2015 2016 2017* 20.6% Increase *Data is incomplete for the whole year. Close to 44 classes hosted at workplace sites!
  141. 141. Goals of NDPP: 1. Lose 5-7% of body weight 2. Increase physical activity up to 150 minutes per week. WHY? If both goals are accomplished, participants cut their risk for type 2 diabetes by 58%. People older than 60 cut their risk by 71%. 1 out 3 individuals currently have pre-diabetes— but 9 out of 10 times people don’t know it.(That’s about 79 million people)
  142. 142. Other activities participants are doing: • Getting more engaged in their health • Looking for more health information • Starting further “support groups” • Searching, sharing, and trying healthy recipes • Becoming coaches!
  143. 143. New lifestyle coaches joining the team soon!!! February 20 & 21, 2018– Essentia Health St. Joseph’s Hospital After this training you will know how to: • Learn how to facilitate and utilize the evidence-based curriculum for the National Diabetes Prevention Program by supplying diabetes prevention education and support to people with pre- diabetes. • Help support those to lose weight, increase physical activity, develop problem solving skills and coping skills. • Truly make a healthy difference in the lives of community members by helping others develop a healthy lifestyle.
  144. 144. Further Information: NDPP Brochure (In folder) NDPP Training Flyer (In folder) Crow Wing Energized Webpage
  145. 145. “Every great and commanding movement in the annals of the world are due to the triumph of enthusiasm— Nothing great was ever achieved without it” —Ralph Waldo Emerson Real People! Real Relationships! Real Results!
  146. 146. Creating a Culture of Health & Wellness
  147. 147. Healthy Eating Made Simple…Create a Healthy Space
  148. 148. Social support + time savings Wellness programs that naturally engage employees to be successful in healthy lifestyle practices
  149. 149. Making the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice
  150. 150. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  151. 151. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  152. 152. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  153. 153. Rethink Your Drink on Google Images
  154. 154. Essentia Health - St. Joseph’s Medical Center River Grille, Stop Light to Good Health
  155. 155. Stop Light to Good Health
  156. 156. Stop Light to Good Health
  157. 157. Stop Light to Good Health
  158. 158. Lettuce Sliced Ham Sliced Cheese Spinach Sliced Roast Beef Sliced Pickles Tomatoes Hummus Banana Peppers Onions White Bread Sliced Turkey Multigrain Bread 12 Grain Bread Sandwich Bar Choices Stop Light to Good Health
  159. 159. A grassroots community health and wellness movement led and funded by
  160. 160. Stop Light to Good Health
  161. 161. Stop Light to Good Health
  162. 162. Stop Light to Good Health
  163. 163. Wrap Up & Next Steps Stefan Gingerich StayWell
  164. 164. Partner Cards & Next Steps
  165. 165. Thank you!

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