“ May You Live  in Interesting Times!” Jyrki J.J. Kasvi Parliament of Finland - Committee for the Future
Committee for the Future <ul><li>The first committee for the future in the world! </li></ul><ul><li>Established in 1993 in...
The interesting times are only beginning <ul><li>The industrial revolution had two stages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>During the...
Challenges <ul><li>Politicians’  ICT literacy  and enthusiasm varies greatly </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information society pol...
Lessig: Code is Law <ul><li>Politicians do not understood that this is high  P olitics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decisions mad...
A new concept of humanity: Homo Cyberneticus e.g. ”Brain pacer” A dream or a nightmare?
Information civilization Level of civilization Before language Speech Writing Printing ICT Available information ~ 10 7  b...
Always everywhere with everybody <ul><li>Information society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When we can pay for parking with a text...
A great opportunity <ul><li>The three key technologies of a ubiquitous society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification (what/...
Big Brother  becomes  Some Brother <ul><li>In a ubiquitous society everything communicates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your hand...
New glocal identities <ul><li>Traditional  local  social networks  are becoming closer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” Mobile trib...
18.6.2010 www.kasvi.org Asymmetric conflicts <ul><li>Asymmetric values, crises and conflicts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Global ...
(R)evolution of warfare <ul><li>Wars are fought for/with/against the most valuable assets of the time: </li></ul><ul><ul><...
U.S. Air Force photo U.S. Drones providing intel for taleban troops in Afganistan.
New targets <ul><li>Military information systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>U.S. 1997: The Eligible Receiver military exercise ...
Virtual democracy and security <ul><li>Democracy = privacy & freedom of expression </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to get in...
Mail vs. email <ul><li>” Unabomber” terrorised U.S. for 18 years, killing 3 and wounding 29 with his  letter  bombs. </li>...
Opportunities for a new society <ul><li>Anyone can be a mass media! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>37.000 Finnish blogs alone! </li...
Challenges for society <ul><li>Selection of information sources that foster personal opinions and prejudices  </li></ul><u...
Open information society = Open API <ul><li>In an open information society all public data and metadata are available to a...
Me myself and I <ul><li>Identity theft is not a crime in Finland  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal data of millions of peopl...
Out of the frying pan – into the fire <ul><li>Rfid passports   may actually undermine security </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Also ...
Trust and security <ul><li>Your daughter has a new boyfriend, and you have an untraceable access to a database with his in...
Sukupuolten välinen digikuilu? Discussion? U.S. Army photo
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May you live in interesting times

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A presentation given to a Chinese delegation in the Parliament on September 6th.

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  • Eero Paloheimo, Martti Tiuri, Jyrki Katainen
  • May you live in interesting times

    1. 1. “ May You Live in Interesting Times!” Jyrki J.J. Kasvi Parliament of Finland - Committee for the Future
    2. 2. Committee for the Future <ul><li>The first committee for the future in the world! </li></ul><ul><li>Established in 1993 in the middle of a deep national recession </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Initiative by the members of the Parliament (167/200)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Does not take actively part in day to day legislation by choice </li></ul><ul><li>Prepares Parliament’s replies for Government’s Futures reports concerning national long-term development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. Finnish population policy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Responsible for parliamentary technology assessment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. Information society, gene technology, RFID, future of health care </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Brings into political discussion longer term (20-100 yrs) issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” A parliamentary think-tank” </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. The interesting times are only beginning <ul><li>The industrial revolution had two stages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>During the first 50 years, the industrial technologies evolved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>During the second 50 years, these technologies changed the society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The first commercial computers came to market some 50 years ago </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Industrialisation changed the basic structures of our societies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Family, labour market, competency system, government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Even distribution of economic, political and military world power </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In 10 years time just about any technology can be affecting our daily lives even if it were not invented yet! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It took 100-120 years to build the wired telephone infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It took 10 years to build 1,1 billion wireless telephone connections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It took 2 years for social network services like Facebook to take over the world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For example, Intel has just patented working thought recognition </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Challenges <ul><li>Politicians’ ICT literacy and enthusiasm varies greatly </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information society policies are not found politically important nor interesting by all </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some of the more experienced and influential politicians still live in typewriter age </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Legislative process is way too slow </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. the new Finnish modem hijacking prevention law </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Net culture has been overlooked by press and politics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A whole Finnish generation was in Habbo and IRC Gallery before mainstream media noticed social media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 100.000 Finns played poker in Internet before… </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Lessig: Code is Law <ul><li>Politicians do not understood that this is high P olitics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Decisions made now define information society as concretely as railroad and electrical network defined industrial society </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Technologies have built in values that direct the change! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. where were the first versions of Internet core protocols coded? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those hippies are still shaping our societies to their own image </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>New interactive participative media create new social cultures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>SMS, P2P, Wiki, IRC galleries, PodCasts, social media, blogsphere </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom to select and choose, freedom to create and publish </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom to create totally new kinds of communities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Civil rights and freedoms have to be rediscussed and redefined </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Politicians do not see the relevance of ICT for civil rights </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. the Finnish national information society strategy (2007-2015) does not mention civil rights at all </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. A new concept of humanity: Homo Cyberneticus e.g. ”Brain pacer” A dream or a nightmare?
    7. 7. Information civilization Level of civilization Before language Speech Writing Printing ICT Available information ~ 10 7 bits ~ 10 9 bits ~ 10 11 bits ~ 10 17 bits ~ 10 25 bits <ul><li>Writing was a prerequisite for cities </li></ul><ul><li>Printing press was a prerequisite for renaissance and industrialisation </li></ul><ul><li>What is the real outcome of ICT? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Always everywhere with everybody <ul><li>Information society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When we can pay for parking with a text message everywhere in Finland </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When we can read our medical reports in web and get our medicine with a digital prescription. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>When our cars and parking slots agree on the parking fee among themselves. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When our grocery's loyalty program tells our doctor's computer what we eat. </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. A great opportunity <ul><li>The three key technologies of a ubiquitous society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identification (what/who – rfid)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Positioning (where – gps, Galileo, Beidou)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Geoinformation (context)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wireless communication and sensors </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Only our imagination is the limit of applications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Navigators are just a humble beginning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Road pricing, mobile gaming, personalised tourist information etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social creation of geoinformation </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Big Brother becomes Some Brother <ul><li>In a ubiquitous society everything communicates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Your handset reports your location to your friends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Your loyalty program reports your beer and butter consumption to your doctor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Everything and everybody can be identified and positioned </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kids are already being tracked in Japan </li></ul></ul><ul><li>But also criminals can read RFID chips in our passports and tap into surveillance camera transmissions </li></ul><ul><li>The end of double standards or the beginning of neomoralism ? </li></ul>
    11. 11. New glocal identities <ul><li>Traditional local social networks are becoming closer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” Mobile tribes” are constantly online, communicating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtual societies weaken the meaning of time and place (facebook, LinkedIn)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The concept of privacy is changing as we distribute private information to our personal networks (twitter, flicker, …)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New global social networks are spreading around the world </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Global network cultures of like minded people, sharing the same values and interests and interacting in the Web (Open source movement, Greenpeace, Al Qaida)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Geographical borders lose their meaning as social barriers (Habbo, 2nd Life)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New interactive participative media create new social cultures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Network cultures, even network nations are replacing geographical borders, languages or history as a basis for identity </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. 18.6.2010 www.kasvi.org Asymmetric conflicts <ul><li>Asymmetric values, crises and conflicts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Global network cultures vs. Nation states </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>WWF Rainbow Warrior vs. French secret service </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Al Qaida vs. Western world </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local conflicts spread around the world in the web </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Completely virtual internet conflicts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. civil rights activists vs. hate groups </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Memes create spontaneous uncoordinated citizen movements </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. Philippines in 2001: An SMS - &quot;Go 2 EDSA. Wear Blck&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Asymmetric costs of cyber warfare </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Attack is cheap, defence is expensive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A limitless number of targets to defend while a single security lapse is enough for the attacker </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Even identification of the attacker may be impossible </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. (R)evolution of warfare <ul><li>Wars are fought for/with/against the most valuable assets of the time: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agrarian: fertile land and people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Industrial: (and) raw materials and industry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information society: (and) information and information systems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Value society: (and) values, reputations, brands, ? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>(Hannu K. Kari, National Defence University)‏ </li></ul>
    14. 14. U.S. Air Force photo U.S. Drones providing intel for taleban troops in Afganistan.
    15. 15. New targets <ul><li>Military information systems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>U.S. 1997: The Eligible Receiver military exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Irak 2003: ”If we run out of batteries, we are screwed” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Afganistan 2008: Taleban tapping on Predator video feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Internet infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Estonia 2007: Web War One </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What if they had had an Internet election at the time? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protected, secured and separated networks for critical systems </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Data and information </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Manipulation and destruction of public and corporate databases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Weakening the capability to make decisions and to act on them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information integrity, usability and backup </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Values and attitudes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Influencing people’s motivation and attitude </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open, transparent society </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Virtual democracy and security <ul><li>Democracy = privacy & freedom of expression </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability to get information and express opinions without fear of retribution – even in the web </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. the background of the Finnish Constitution 100 years ago, when censorship of critical papers lead to civil unrest and political terrorism. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Security and economic concerns challenge civil rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Retention of telecommunication data (security vs. privacy)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blocking of inappropriate content (child protection vs. freedom of expr.)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stopping file sharers (copyright holders’ interests vs. privacy)‏ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No central control is possible in a networked world </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prohibitions encourage counter culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Finnish “video law” inspired the most sophisticated splatter culture in the world, based on a huge number of smuggled ultra violent video tapes </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Mail vs. email <ul><li>” Unabomber” terrorised U.S. for 18 years, killing 3 and wounding 29 with his letter bombs. </li></ul><ul><li>No-one suggested that we should collect data about our mail traffic in order to make such terrorist campaigns impossible. </li></ul><ul><li>Is email so different? </li></ul>
    18. 18. Opportunities for a new society <ul><li>Anyone can be a mass media! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>37.000 Finnish blogs alone! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New people enter political discussions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. copyright laws and child porn filtering </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliberative democracy requires new rules </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crowdsourcing as a decision making tool </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New social networks replace and enhance old NGOs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MoveOn.org: 5.0 million members! </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social demands can create new media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>South Korea: ohmynews.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Germany: bildblog.de </li></ul></ul>
    19. 19. Challenges for society <ul><li>Selection of information sources that foster personal opinions and prejudices </li></ul><ul><ul><li>World views become fragmented and conflicts inflame </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CNN USA vs. Fox USA </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Populistic Gallupcracy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous direct interaction with voters may discourage informed, compromise seeking future oriented decision making </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From digital divide to activity divide </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The same technology that can be used to empower people can also alienate them from politics and social questions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Technology that empowers citizens may also be used to censor, monitor and control them </li></ul><ul><ul><li>” Why should law abiding citizens fear monitoring?” </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Open information society = Open API <ul><li>In an open information society all public data and metadata are available to all through an open API for free. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>API (Application Programming Interface) provides access to data in a machine readable format </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Companies and citizens utilise the data to create their own services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From usage fees to tax income </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mashups of different data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People know best what they want </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open API facilitates also multidiciplinary public services </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A new relationship between public information and privacy </li></ul>Wikimedia Commons
    21. 21. Me myself and I <ul><li>Identity theft is not a crime in Finland </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Personal data of millions of people are missing around the world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In U.S., identity theft caused estimated €34 billion worth of damages in 2007. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identification technology used has to be solid </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1:1.000.000 reliability is not enough if you identify millions of people every day. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Biometric identification data has to be kept safe </li></ul><ul><ul><li>With biometric data you can pretend to be anybody </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It is impossible to get a new fingerprint or DNA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biometric passports spread our biometrics to every border station </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identity protection should become a new civil right! </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We need a global agreement on data security </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Out of the frying pan – into the fire <ul><li>Rfid passports may actually undermine security </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Also criminals and terrorists know how to read rfid chips </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rfid passports of many countries have already been broken and data altered </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Telecom data retention may actually be dangerous </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Colombian drug cartels have used telecom data to identify informers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Azerbaidžan police interrogated citizens that had voted Armenia with their mobile phones in the 2009 Eurovision song contest </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Child porn filtering may actually help pedophiles </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Filtering is very easy to circumvent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Filtering lists are relatively easy to analyse to find child porn </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Actions aimed to improve safety and security may actually make the situation worse, if we are not careful. </li></ul>
    23. 23. Trust and security <ul><li>Your daughter has a new boyfriend, and you have an untraceable access to a database with his income/health/crime records. Would you take look into his information? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Never </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only if the guy was somehow suspicious </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Of course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I have already done something like that </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Who is the real threat to information security and people’s trust on information systems? </li></ul>
    24. 24. Sukupuolten välinen digikuilu? Discussion? U.S. Army photo

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