Network Coding
Protocols for Smart Grid
Communications
TEAM- MASTERMINDS
STRUCTURE
BACKGROUND
PROPOSED NETWORK CODING
PROTOCOLS
COMPARISON RESULTS
CONCLUSION
2
B A C K G R O U N D
• SMART GRIDS
• SMART METERS
• CURRENTLY USED - MASTER SLAVE SCHEME
3
A smart grid is an electricity network based
on digital technology that is used to supply
electricity to consumers via two...
There are three main benefits to smart
meters:
SMART METER
More accurate
No one has to come to your home to
read your mete...
CURRENTLY USED
SCHEME
The master (in
this case, the
substation)
requests data
from each
slave (the
secondary
substation) i...
GIST
• NETWORK CODING
• RLNC
• TUNABLE SPARSE
CODING
ONE PHASE ( NC)
TWO PHASE ( NC- fb)
8
WHY USE NETWORK CODING??
Network coding saves
• one transmission (thus saving energy)
• one time slot (thus reducing the d...
Tunable Sparse Coding
There are three key ideas in tunable sparse network coding:
1
• Sparse coding is more beneficial at ...
C O M P A R I S O N R E S U L T S
13
COMPARISON SETTINGS
• NS-2 network simulator
• Wireless Setting
• Collects one packet of 100 bytes
from each sender every ...
15
• BS and the secondary
substations are positioned within
a rectangle of 3300 m
per 2500m. Around each substation,
we ad...
(a) Average percentage of collected packets (c)Average collection time
16
• Topology shown in fig (a) fitting in a
rectangle of 1000 m per 1400 m.
• 32 households are distributed uniformly at
rand...
(b)Average percentage of collected packets. (c) Average collection time.
18
With network coding, the data packets
are collected much sooner than the
defined deadline.
Compared with the MS reference ...
Network coding protocols for smart grid
Network coding protocols for smart grid
Network coding protocols for smart grid
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Network coding protocols for smart grid

  1. 1. Network Coding Protocols for Smart Grid Communications TEAM- MASTERMINDS
  2. 2. STRUCTURE BACKGROUND PROPOSED NETWORK CODING PROTOCOLS COMPARISON RESULTS CONCLUSION 2
  3. 3. B A C K G R O U N D • SMART GRIDS • SMART METERS • CURRENTLY USED - MASTER SLAVE SCHEME 3
  4. 4. A smart grid is an electricity network based on digital technology that is used to supply electricity to consumers via two-way digital communication. 4
  5. 5. There are three main benefits to smart meters: SMART METER More accurate No one has to come to your home to read your meter Better oversight and management of our energy use 5
  6. 6. CURRENTLY USED SCHEME The master (in this case, the substation) requests data from each slave (the secondary substation) in a Round Robin fashion. Master sends a data-request packet to the intended slave, followed by a transmission of data from slave If the data is received correctly, the master proceeds to the next slave. Otherwise, the master repeats the process 7
  7. 7. GIST • NETWORK CODING • RLNC • TUNABLE SPARSE CODING ONE PHASE ( NC) TWO PHASE ( NC- fb) 8
  8. 8. WHY USE NETWORK CODING?? Network coding saves • one transmission (thus saving energy) • one time slot (thus reducing the delay) Structure of the coded packet for the general case. ATypical wireless coding example 9
  9. 9. Tunable Sparse Coding There are three key ideas in tunable sparse network coding: 1 • Sparse coding is more beneficial at the beginning of a transmission session 2 • Dense coding is required towards the end of the sessions for fast completion 3 • Sparse coding translates in reduced complexity 11
  10. 10. C O M P A R I S O N R E S U L T S 13
  11. 11. COMPARISON SETTINGS • NS-2 network simulator • Wireless Setting • Collects one packet of 100 bytes from each sender every 15 min. FIRST EXPERIMENT 14
  12. 12. 15 • BS and the secondary substations are positioned within a rectangle of 3300 m per 2500m. Around each substation, we add 32 households
  13. 13. (a) Average percentage of collected packets (c)Average collection time 16
  14. 14. • Topology shown in fig (a) fitting in a rectangle of 1000 m per 1400 m. • 32 households are distributed uniformly at random within an annulus around each secondary substation, but with a minimum radius of 10 m and a maximum radius of 100 m. The remaining conditions are similar to the 1st experiment. SECOND EXPERIMENT 17
  15. 15. (b)Average percentage of collected packets. (c) Average collection time. 18
  16. 16. With network coding, the data packets are collected much sooner than the defined deadline. Compared with the MS reference protocol, the protocols discussed here exhibited a threefold (without explicit feedback) to tenfold (with explicit feedback) improvement in the collection time. 19

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