Observations and Applications of Geologic Process Justin Stargaard
The identification of rocks isn't quite so tricky if you use your resources.  By consulting the text book, wikipedia, and ...
First Observation <ul><li>This is what I believe is an igneous rock.  This semester I learned igneous rocks that cool on t...
Second Observation <ul><li>This is what I believe to be a small sample of a metamorphic rock.  Underneath the quarts cryst...
Third Observation <ul><li>This is a sedimentary rock.  Sedimentary rocks are composed of sediment and sometimes clasts of ...
Fourth Observation <ul><li>This is my observation of a mineral.  Minerals are the building blocks of rocks.  I chose this ...
Fifth Observation <ul><li>This is a sample of graphite I chose to use to express how the Mohs scale plays a role in the cl...
Observations of Process and Application The next slides showcase my observations of the geologic process along with a brie...
Mass Wasting <ul><li>Mass wasting describes the natural movement of rock and soil downhill by gravity.  Here pictured is a...
Weathering Process First Observation <ul><li>This picture represent the process of oxidation.  Basically when Water comes ...
Weathering Process Second Observation <ul><li>This is an example of spheroidal weathering in which the elements cause the ...
First Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>The dark blue area of the ocean represents a marine sedimentary environment where pi...
Second Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>This is a transcontinental sedimentary environment, or where the sea meets the land...
Third Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>This is a continental sedimentary environment.  You can observe a place where water ...
Observation of a Fault <ul><li>Here is a diagram showing the San Andreas Fault.  I attempted to find the Los Gatos fault i...
Practical Application of Geology First Application <ul><li>This is a drainage ditch installed in front of the Valley State...
Practical Use of Geology Second Observation <ul><li>Here is another example of cement applied to form a backyard oasis for...
Practical Use of Geology Third Observation <ul><li>Enough observation may lead observers to making their own application. ...
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Geo presentation

  1. 1. Observations and Applications of Geologic Process Justin Stargaard
  2. 2. The identification of rocks isn't quite so tricky if you use your resources. By consulting the text book, wikipedia, and other documented resources I was able to understand the differences between the three. To classify them I compared my samples to pre existing definitions of what that rock was. For example igneous rocks are formed by the cooling of lava or magma and the grain depends on where cooling took place. Knowing this knowledge is one key ingredient for the classification of rocks. In a nutshell that is what I did. I collected many rocks, photographed them, and then scrutinized each one under the criteria of what rocks they may have been. Even with the text book on my side it is no easy task. The degree of classification goes to such high levels of definition the untrained mind may not be able to comprehend. This being stated, here are my five rock and mineral samples with reasons on why I named them as such. Enjoy! Identification Process
  3. 3. First Observation <ul><li>This is what I believe is an igneous rock. This semester I learned igneous rocks that cool on the surface may appear to exhibit a “flowing” appearance as the lava did prior to cooling. Because of the “flowing” appearance and lack of grain that an intrusive rock may have, I have deemed this rock an Extrusive Igneous Rock. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Second Observation <ul><li>This is what I believe to be a small sample of a metamorphic rock. Underneath the quarts crystals you can observe what appears to layers. This layered appearance is called “foliation.” Metamorphic rocks are formed through the process of metamorphism in which heat and pressure stress the mineral grains or structural features of the rock. In the text I saw many pictures of large rocks exhibiting many interesting patterns of foliation however, this is the only sample of foliation I was able to come across and document. This process of metamorphism and creation of foliation is a hallmark of metamorphic rocks. I would like to state though that not all metamorphic rocks do exhibit foliation. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Third Observation <ul><li>This is a sedimentary rock. Sedimentary rocks are composed of sediment and sometimes clasts of other material or even fossils. Through the process of sedimentation sediment is moved around the earth and deposits where different variables such as water and pressure can lead to the formation of a sediment rock. This rock appears to be made of sand that was most likely compacted together by a pressure while running water played a role in breaking down bonds and allowing the rock to grow more compact. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Fourth Observation <ul><li>This is my observation of a mineral. Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. I chose this example to showcase a couple qualities minerals may have that lead to there classification. The cube shape of the mineral is one trait because minerals have different shapes that the molecules bond in leading to different shapes. Note the shiny appearance of this sample. This is called luster and the amount of luster a mineral has also leads to its definition. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Fifth Observation <ul><li>This is a sample of graphite I chose to use to express how the Mohs scale plays a role in the classification of minerals. Mohs scale goes from level one to ten, one being to softest a material may be. In the slide you see a piece of graphite a very soft mineral which is so soft is one of the most common materials used for writing. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Observations of Process and Application The next slides showcase my observations of the geologic process along with a brief description of what that process is. To do this I first got a grasp of the basic understanding of the process that way when I began traveling I would know what to keep my eyes open for.
  9. 9. Mass Wasting <ul><li>Mass wasting describes the natural movement of rock and soil downhill by gravity. Here pictured is an elevated piece of land where you can see an overhang waiting to fall. As the weathering process influences the shaping of this process gravity will determine when the overhang is to much of a burden and crumble down below. That being said mass wasting is simply a landslide caused my gravity. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Weathering Process First Observation <ul><li>This picture represent the process of oxidation. Basically when Water comes in contact with iron or steel the oxygen combines to form iron oxide giving off the rusting appearance. The interesting thing about oxidation is that when this process causes sulfide minerals to decompose yielding sulfuric acid that can be devastating to surrounding habitats. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Weathering Process Second Observation <ul><li>This is an example of spheroidal weathering in which the elements cause the breakdown of the rock as exhibited by the cracking appearance and round of the corners of the rocks that remain exposed. As this process continues the process will continue deeper and deeper until very little remains. </li></ul>
  12. 12. First Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>The dark blue area of the ocean represents a marine sedimentary environment where pieces of sediment can be found suspended in the ocean or moving along the floor waiting to deposit or be moved to shore. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Second Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>This is a transcontinental sedimentary environment, or where the sea meets the land. As you can observe the beach is covered in different sediment pieces that have washed onto shore. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Third Sedimentary Environment <ul><li>This is a continental sedimentary environment. You can observe a place where water may flow in a storm and you can imagine the wind blowing across these hills. Those are two factors that allow sediment to traverse across land otherwise known as a continental environment. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Observation of a Fault <ul><li>Here is a diagram showing the San Andreas Fault. I attempted to find the Los Gatos fault in Coalinga, Ca that formed when an earthquake occurred in Coalinga. Faults are fissures in the landscape caused by the movement of tectonic plates. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Practical Application of Geology First Application <ul><li>This is a drainage ditch installed in front of the Valley State Prison for Women. By combining limestone and clay a product known as cement is formed. Here cement is observed to form a ditch that prevents water from overflowing the entrance of the prison and flooding the first security check point. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Practical Use of Geology Second Observation <ul><li>Here is another example of cement applied to form a backyard oasis for a suburban home. As you can see you remove the water and the application of limestone and clay still prevails. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Practical Use of Geology Third Observation <ul><li>Enough observation may lead observers to making their own application. Here is some hand shaped limestone and clay in a backyard in Fresno, California. </li></ul>

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