SlideShare a Scribd company logo

PascackPress 12.28.20.pdf

.

1 of 32
Download to read offline
FORTHE CORPS
FORTHE CORPS
Emerson • Hillsdale • Montvale • Park Ridge • River Vale • Township of Washington • Westwood • Woodcliff Lake
P A S C A C K V A L L E Y ’ S B E S T H O M E T O W N N E W S P A P E R
VOLUME 24 ISSUE 41 DECEMBER 28, 2020
Friends from Hillsdale and River Vale pooled
their talents on Dec. 17 and gave rise to a “Coca-
Cola” snow bear in Hillsdale’s Veterans Park.
SEE PAGE 23
BUILD A BEAR
The New York Evening World ran an item on Dec.
30, 1893 about fresh burglaries along the New
Jersey and New York Railroad line, including at
the stations in Westwood and Etna (Emerson).
SEE PAGE 4
STELLAR
STUDENT
Westwood High’s Isabel Rhee
earns prestigious Dwight D.
Eisenhower Leadership Award.
SEE PAGE 11
B ck in time...
PHOTO BY WTVAC
BY MICHAEL OLOHAN
OF PASCACK PRESS
A nearly 13-acre parcel previ-
ously targeted for 73 townhomes at
463 Van Emburgh Ave.—with a
development proposal expected in
2021—qualifies for a massive tax
deduction due to its following a
woodlands management plan for two
years that cut its annual tax rate to
about $50 annually in 2019 and
2020.
However, should the property be
developed, local officials say the
landowner will need to repay the
property taxes saved under the farm-
land assessment law.
At Township Attorney Ken
Pollerʼs recommendation, the council
on Dec. 21 tabled a resolution to
refund 463 Van Emburgh Ave.
(Tomaron Inc./Viviano) $12,572.51
for its payment of 2020ʼs first two
quarterly tax bills. The council tabled
the resolution Dec. 7 over concerns
See TAX on page 254
MASSIVE TAX
REFUND?
Council seeks facts on
ʻVivianoʼtimber sales
TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON
Continued on page 16
WESTWOOD / TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON
Not seven swans a-swim-
ming but rather seven Cardinals
a-cheering! Going door to door,
Junior Cardinals cheerleaders,
whose program has merged those
of the Westwood and Washington
Township rec programs, surprised
the Washington Township Volun-
teer Ambulance Corps last week
with gifts of Christmas wreaths:
one per home and a larger one for
the headquarters door.
According to WTVAC Life
Member Richard Miras, the crews
have continued to ride and pro-
vide ambulance service through-
out the COVID pandemic.”
“It was a very emotionally
charged time for our members to
be recognized and thanked by
the cheerleaders, who traveled as
a group to each of our homes to
personally deliver the wreaths.
Each of us had to make a deci-
sion whether we would continue
SPREADING JOY: Junior Cardinals cheerleaders Gina Castronova, Emma Claire Readie, Jenna Zotollo, Elorie Roberts, Maya
Goldman, Elly DePiero, and Molly McGinty went to ambulance crew members’ homes to deliver wreaths and thanks.
Cardinal cheerleaders deliver wreaths to COVID ambulance crews
2
DECEMBER
28,
2020
•
PASCACK
VALLEY
PRESS
In coordination with Rugged
Outfitters, 89 Broadway in Park
Ridge, Post 162 acquired a consid-
erable supply of warm clothing,
including thick hoodies, sweatpants,
T-shirts, socks, underwear, gloves,
and scarves.
The post added knitted wool
throws made by a local prayer shawl
ministry.
According to A.J. Luna, direc-
tor of Veteran Services for Bergen
County, speaking at the handoff of
the clothes, “As winter approaches
these supplies are desperately need-
ed by the population they serve.”
Post Trustee Phil Langner, who
coordinated the project this year,
said, “The strong bond that veterans
share makes our participation in the
program rewarding for our mem-
bers, especially this year in the
midst of the pandemic.”
Thank you to all who con-
tributed to make this effort a suc-
cess.
Commander Doug Frank
American Legion Post 162
Emerson, the
family town,
delivers
To the editor:
I WOULD LIKE to extend special
thanks to everyone in Emerson
who went the extra mile to spread
holiday cheer, including but not
limited to:
• The Emerson Recreation
Commission, for hosting the First
Annual Deck the Homes contest.
Every street in town looks extra
cheery this year thanks to this
effort.
• The Emerson Elementary
PTA, for sending the Grinch and
company around town to collect
supplies for our elementary
schools, spreading mischief and
merriment along the way.
• The Emerson Volunteer Fire
Department, for escorting Santa
and Mrs Claus on their annual hol-
iday tour. Over three bitterly cold
nights they ensured every street, no
matter how narrow or short, got a
visit from these special guests, and
PASCACK PRESS
LETTERSTOTHE EDITOR
children all over rejoiced.
Emerson is truly the Family
Town. Thanks to all who gave of
themselves to bring joy to others. I
am very proud to live here.
Kate Stutzel
Emerson
Hillsdale
called out
on jail issue
To the editor:
RECENT ATTENTION has been
brought to Bergen County in
response to a monthlong hunger
strike undertaken by ICE detainees
in the Bergen County Jail, in Hack-
ensack. ICE detainees requested
that they be released to fight their
cases from the outside due to con-
cerns around COVID-19 transmis-
sion within the jail.
The hunger strike was also in
protest of inhumane conditions that
detainees have been subjected to
within the jail.Andrea Sáenz, attor-
ney in charge of the New York
Immigrant Family Unity Project
(NYIFUP) for Brooklyn Defender
Services, released a statement con-
cerning this on Dec. 8, stating,
“The people we represent have
long reported negligent and dan-
gerous conditions in ICE detention,
only worsened by the pandemic,
including solitary confinement,
lack of basic sanitation, and inade-
quate medical care.
“In recent days, we have heard
NOTE: Letter submission deadline is 11 a.m.
Wednesday for the following Monday’s paper.
Publication not guaranteed. Subject to editing.
Email to pascackpress@thepressgroup.net.
Warm hearts
back county
veterans
To the editor:
AMERICAN LEGION Post 162
of Hillsdale continued its support
for the Bergen County veterans
backpack program [the Jersey
City-based not-for-profit Back-
packs For Life] on Dec. 21, with a
considerable donation of warm
clothing.
Although Bergen County was
recognized by the White House for
virtually eliminating homelessness
in its veterans population and the
program was considered a model
for the nation to follow, the need to
support veterans continues.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 23
DRIVING SCHOOL INC.
Lic. # 045-85N
• Highly Respected, Full Service Driving School
• Prep Lessons, 6 Hour Lessons & Road Tests
• Experienced State Licensed Instructors
Call Now to Schedule Your Appointment!
358 Kinderkamack Road, Westwood, NJ
201-666-4147
since
1978
201.775.0037
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults!
EST. 2002
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES
10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES WITHTHISAD.
NEW CLIENTS ONLY
201.775.0037
201.775.0037
201.775.0037
201.775.0037
201.775.0037
KAPLAN
LANDSCAPING LLC.
Commercial • Residential
Snow Plowing • De-Icing • Sidewalks • Emergency Service
LANDSCAPE SERVICE FOR 2021
KAPLAN
LANDSCAPING LLC.
426 HILLSDALE AVE., HILLSDALE, NJ • (201)497-3997
$
2Off
YOUR HAIR CUT
WITH AD • OFFER EXPIRES 1/31/21
STOP IN
AND SEE
TIM &
RALPH!
MEN’S CUTS
$16
TIM’S BARBER SHOP
TIM’S BARBER SHOP
WE’RE
BACK!
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
John’s Famous Bagels
John’s Famous Bagels
John’s Famous Bagels
John’s Famous Bagels
John’s Famous Bagels
SUPERBAGELDEALS!
SUPERBAGELDEALS!
PARK RIDGE
183 Kinderkamack Rd • 201-930-4940
WOODCLIFF LAKE
94 Broadway • 201-746-6257
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
ANY BREAKFAST
CHOICE OF: Ham, Bacon,
Taylor Ham or Sausage, Egg &
Cheese On Bagel With Coffee
$
499
$
499
$
499
$
499
$
499
6 BAGELS
1/2lb. Cream Cheese
$
699
$
699
$
699
$
699
$
699
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
4 FREE
BAGELS
4 FREE
BAGELS
4 FREE
BAGELS
4 FREE
BAGELS
4 FREE
BAGELS
w/ Purchase of 12 Bagels
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
ANY LUNCH
SANDWICH
With Can Of Soda or Small Water
$
599
$
599
$
599
$
599
$
599
WEEKEND SPECIAL
6 Bagels, 1/4 lb. Nova,
1/2 lb. Plain Cream Cheese
$
1599
$
1599
$
1599
$
1599
$
1599
1 FREE
MUFFIN
1 FREE
MUFFIN
1 FREE
MUFFIN
1 FREE
MUFFIN
1 FREE
MUFFIN
w/ Purchase of 2 Muffins
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21
Parking spaces at Our Lady of
Good Counsel Church—at a cost of
$2,500 per month—will not be need-
ed for DPW vehicles as alternate
locations were found, Mayor Peter
Calamari reported at the Dec. 21
council meeting.
Such parking became a hot
topic in October when the council
approved the mayor executing a
$60,000 annual parking agreement
with OLGC, although he continued
to look for low- or no-cost options.
Several council members cited
the parking cost and contract provi-
sions that required the township to
snow plow, pave, and maintain the
parking lot and nearby sidewalks as
worrisome.
The parking is needed because
the DPW facility is planned for dem-
olition and is under state deadline to
remediate contaminated soil on site
by May 2021.
Calamari said Dec. 21 that up to
six large DPW vehicles, such as
garbage trucks and loaders, will be
parked on a portion of Sherry Field,
which is a permitted use under the
stateʼs GreenAcres program.
All local parks are subject to
Green Acres regulations since state
grant funds were accepted for
improvements.
Other DPW vehicles will be
storedbehindValleyBank,initspark-
ing lot, which was offered at no cost
to the township. “We appreciate their
kind gesture,” Calamari said.
He said township-owned prop-
erty at the end of HudsonAvenue will
temporarily house two 12 foot by 24
foot residential-looking storage sheds
that may remain until a new DPW
building location is found.
He thanked councilman Steven
Cascio for suggesting the locationʼs
use.
Calamari said another “small
piece” of township property will be
used to construct a two-bay modular
construction garage for DPW vehicle
maintenance.
Calamari said officials were still
tryingtofindalocalsitetoaccommo-
date a new DPW facility.
In our letters section on Dec. 21,
Calamari pushed back against ques-
tions of ethics surrounding the town-
shipʼs apparent fallback plan for the
OLGC property. His father is an
OLGC trustee and serves on the
church finance committee. The
mayor said negotiations were with
theArchdiocese of Newark.
— Michael Olohan
DPW parking bound for Sherry Field, bank lot
TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON
JOHN NEUBAUER
JOHN NEUBAUER
JOHN NEUBAUER
JOHN NEUBAUER
JOHN NEUBAUER
JOHN NEUBAUER
AIR CONDITIONING
• Sales • Service • Replacement • Maintenance
• Space Pak • Unico Systems • Mini-Splits
HEATING
• Hot Air Furnaces • Humidifiers
• Hot Water & Steam Boilers
• Service Repair Replacement
• Oil Service • Cleaning
• Oil Tank Sales & Service
• Oil to Gas Conversions
ELECTRONIC WATER SOFTENERS
HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, LLC
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397
SINCE 1980
FULLY INSURED
& BONDED
EMERGENCY
SERVICE
NJ Lic# 13VH00248400 • 19HC00582300
3
DECEMBER
28,
2020
•
PASCACK
VALLEY
PRESS
WOODCLIFF LAKE
Despite more than $48,000
approved by the Borough Council
in July for site remediation and
environmental oversight at Galaxy
Gardens—site of a future park—
no remediation has been done
mostly due to COVID-related staff
shortages, said a local official.
Administrator Tom Padilla
said the 2.1-acre site, at Woodcliff
Avenue and Werimus Road, was
to have park designs presented this
year, but itʼs now behind schedule.
Officials had been hoping to
complete remediation by the end
of 2019.
In late July, Padilla said he
anticipated soil remediation work
due to gasoline contamination to
be completed in four weeks.
On Dec. 7, Padilla said the
soil remediation was not complet-
ed due to staff Covid-19 outages at
the boroughʼs licensed site reme-
diation professional, First Envi-
ronment.
“They know this is a priority
for us” said Padilla. He promised
heʼll have weekly updates from
First Environment to find out
where the work stands.
He told Pascack Press last
week, “My concern is the weather
will be changing and weʼll segue
into some other delays.”
The $48,000 soil remediation
cost includes $31,525 to remove
and replace 225 tons of soil and
$17,100 for site monitoring.
The borough already spent
$355,600 on clearing, grading,
and remediating the former garden
center and gas station property.
At risk due to delays is an
approved $500,000 Bergen Coun-
ty open space grant for park devel-
opment. The funds will be
released only when the site has
been certified as meeting state
environmental standards, Padilla
said.
Mayor Carlos Rendo broke a
council tie vote, ultimately 4–3, in
February 2018, allowing the $1.65
million site purchase. Residents
and some officials opposed the
deal in part because because of
possible contamination stemming
from from prior land uses.
The site was also considered
as a location for Valley Chabadʼs
synagogue expansion. That effort
foundered in part on contamina-
tion concerns and municipal
efforts to acquire the property.
The borough also applied for
a $341,000 county matching grant
in July. Padilla said the boroughʼs
contribution likely would come
from its local Open Space fund, a
bond issue, or corporate sponsor-
ships.
Moreover, the borough
applied for a $167,000 county
park development match grant in
July to help pay for design and
architectural services.
If it comes through, the
$341,000 county grant could be
used for sidewalk installation, a
gazebo, a flagpole, lighting, land-
scaping, irrigation, monuments,
signage, trash receptacles, and
benches.
GRANTS HANG IN BALANCE
AS ‘GALAXY’ SITE CLEANUP STALLS
BY MICHAEL OLOHAN
OF PASCACK PRESS
Make a difference in your com-
munity.Volunteer to teach English as
a Second Language.
Since 1982, Literacy Volunteers
of Pascack Valley has been training
volunteers to teach English to adults
in their community. This remote
workshop is run by a certified trainer.
The program is an accredited mem-
ber of the national organization, Pro-
literacy.
Upon completion of the work-
shop, LVPV will match the volunteer
with an appropriate student.
This workshop is open to resi-
dentsofDumont,Emerson,Hillsdale,
Mahwah, Montvale, Paramus, Park
Ridge,Ramsey,RiverVale,andWest-
wood. All tutoring is remote via
Zoom, Facetime, WhatsApp, or
phone. The workshop will cover the
use of these technologies.
Itʼs easy to register. Write to
literacyvolunteerspv@gmail.com or visit
literacyvolunteerspv.org/tutor-training-
workshop-form.html.
Learn to Teach English as a Second Language
PASCACK VALLEY
NEWEST MATERIALS • FINEST LABORERS • ON TIME SCHEDULING
201.791.7844
201.791.7844
201.791.7844
201.791.7844
FREE
ESTIMATES
MASTER
LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379
4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1938
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF
201.791.7844
KITCHENS & BATHS
WWW.MASTERKITCHENSANDBATHS.COM
NEW YEAR,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
NEW YEAR,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
NEW YEAR,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
NEW YEAR,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
NEW YEAR,
NEW KITCHEN & BATH
FREE SINK BASE WITH PURCHASE OF 12 CABINETS OR MORE
FREE SINK BASE WITH PURCHASE OF 12 CABINETS OR MORE
HOURS:
MON / TUE / WED
& FRI 9-5PM
THUR 9-8PM
SAT 10-2PM
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1938
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1938
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1938
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1938
ALL UNDER ONE ROOF
LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379
4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379
4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379
4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379
4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 335
Westwood, N.J. 07675
Serving Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge,
River Vale, Township of Washington, Westwood
and Woodcliff Lake
The articles and opinions printed in Pascack Press
are not necessarily those of the publisher. Pascack
Press is neither liable nor responsible for typo-
graphical errors. This publication contains material
developed independently by Pascack Press. It may
not be reproduced, in whole or in part.
Pascack Press is published in Westwood and is
distributed to every household in our circulation area.
EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING
201.664.2105
FAX 201.664.2109
E-MAIL US AT
pascackpress@thepressgroup.net
P A S C A C K V A L L E Y ’ S
H O M E T O W N N E W S P A P E R
Publisher John J. DeFina
Editor John Snyder
Assistant Editor Kristin Beuscher
Art Director Keith J. Harcher
Director of Advertising George F. Harcher
LETTERS 2
EATS DINING 11
LIBRARY CALENDAR 12
HEALTH & WELLNESS 17
HOMEIMPROVEMENT 22
REALESTATE 23
SERVICES 27
OBITUARIES 30
inside
4
DECEMBER
28,
2020
•
PASCACK
VALLEY
PRESS
ADVERTISE YOUR
SERVICE IN THE
SERVICE DIRECTORY IN
THE PASCACK PRESS.
B ck in time...
B ck in time...
This item appeared in the New York
Evening World on Saturday, Dec. 30, 1893.
The previous night, burglars worked their
way down the New Jersey and New York
Railroad line, hitting the stations in West-
wood and Etna (Emerson), among others.
Seven of the New Jersey and New York
Railroad stations, between Hillsdale and
Hackensack, were visited by burglars last
night.
Automatic weighing machines were
broken open, the money bags cut off with a
knife, and the contents carried away. Ticket
cases were broken open, tickets were scat-
tered over the floors and express packages
were rifled. The greater part of the money
obtained was from the weighing-machines.
The stations broken open were: Central
Avenue, Hackensack; Cherry Hill; River
Edge; New Milford; Oradell; Etna; and West-
wood. The thieves secured the most booty at
Oradell. Besides taking the money from the
weighing-machine they took a package that
contained a suit of clothes belonging to F.F.
Bulkley, and broke open a package of fancy
goods belonging to a Mrs. Scott.
William Covert, a brakeman on a freight
train, found a box of writing paper and a
womanʼs stocking, supposed to have been
taken from the package of Mrs. Scott and
dropped by the burglars in their hurry.
For the last three years the stations on
the lower end of the road have been broken
into once a year regularly, and some of them
oftener, especially Central Avenue, which
has been entered three or four times over the
past year.
Museum’s
saleisnow
openfor
members
PASCACK VALLEY
Due to the governorʼs latest
executive order limiting indoor
gatherings to 10 people or fewer,
the Pascack Historical Society has
had to change course for its Holi-
day Boutique and Curio Sale.
For now, the usual sale is
being postponed until the spring.
However, because so many dona-
tions have come in, the museum is
opening up the sale exclusively to
its members by appointment in
the coming weeks. Time slots are
available on Wednesday mornings
and Sunday afternoons.
If you are a Pascack Histori-
cal Society member, email
info@pascackhistoricalsociety.or
g to arrange a time to shop (feel
free to bring your immediate fam-
ily, or a friend).
The thousands of sale items
include antiques, collectibles, hol-
iday decor, artwork, books, vin-
tage jewelry, handbags (from
1950s to designer), china, small
furniture, brand new toys, and so
much more.
For those who arenʼt mem-
bers, now is the perfect time to
join. Annual dues start at $30. If
you sign up now, your dues will
cover the 2021 year. Membership
also entitles you to receive the
Societyʼs quarterly newsletter,
“RELICS,” which is full of local
history features.
The Pascack Historical Soci-
ety is at 19 Ridge Ave., Park
Ridge. The museum is open to
visitors every Sunday from 1–4
p.m. Admission is free.
For more information, visit
pascackhistoricalsociety.org, call
(201) 573-0307, and follow the
museum on Facebook.
THIS WEEK IN LOCAL HISTORY:
Burglars make year-end stops in Westwood, Etna
THE WESTWOOD STATION (top) and Etna station (bottom) at the turn of the 20th century. Both stations were built when the railroad first
came through the Pascack Valley in 1870. This original Westwood station was made of wood and stood on Broadway on the opposite side of
the tracks from the current station. The photo also shows a row of buildings that once stood in what is now Veterans Memorial Park. Etna’s
station still stands off Kinderkamack Road, although it now has a brick facade. The borough was renamed Emerson in 1909.
THE HEADLINE from the Dec. 30, 1893 New
York Evening World article about local train
station burglaries. Note the antiquated use of
the term “slot machine,” which had nothing
to do with gambling. The term referred to any
coin-operated vending machine—in this
case, weighing machines.
DECEMBER
28,
2020
•
PASCACK
VALLEY
PRESS
5
TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON
Mayor Peter Calamari said on
Dec. 21 that he planned to update
residents within weeks about possi-
ble negotiations and legal options
regarding the 3.2-acre tract at 450
Pascack Road.
The property owner, still
advertising for commercial interest
in the land, has neighbors who have
been pressing the council to swoop
in while they can.
At the Dec. 21 council meet-
ing, Council President Stacey
Feeney noted that “anything thatʼs
negotiated behind the scenes cannot
be spoken about until some sort of
agreement has come.”
Calamari would not confirm
whether negotiations with Robert
Morris, whose family owns 450
Pascack Road, or developer Nick
Tsapatsaris of Lakos Construction,
with whom Morris evidently is
working, were ongoing.
He said he would have more
information in mid-January 2021.
In early December, resident
Joseph Scalia offered the governing
body four reasons why officials
need to “finally act on behalf of its
residents” and preserve the mostly
wooded private property.
Scalia is one of three Ridge-
wood Boulevard East homeowners
pressing the Township Council for
action while the land is available.
Earlier this fall, Scalia along
with Michael Proto and Brian Sin-
clair, hired attorney Charles H.
Sarlo to represent them to the
mayor and council, urging “imme-
diate and affirmative action…to
preserve 450 Pascack Road from
further development.”
An Oct. 19 email from the res-
idents called on the township to
either take the property at fair mar-
ket value through eminent domain
or rezone “a majority” of the tract
as open space/recreational zone.
The land abuts Memorial Field.
The council took no action.
Pascack Press has requested a
copy of official correspondence
related to the matter. The council
took to closed session Dec. 7 to
hear options on 450 Pascack Road
from the town planner and attorney.
Scaliaʼs recent email notes that
about two months ago more than 10
families met with local officials to
discuss the situation and said his
email is “a reminder why 450 Pas-
cack Road is critical for the town
today and for tomorrow to preserve
from development.”
The email cites four reasons,
including “the safety of our chil-
dren,” with Washington Elementary
School next door; the felling of
more than 200 “mature trees”; and
related stormwater impacts such as
flooding and sediment runoff.
Other issues include possible
homes or huge retaining walls over-
looking Memorial Field as well as
the possibility of future residentsʼ
complaints limiting Memorial Field
activities.
“We must preserve 450 Pas-
cack for future needs, expansion of
our facilities, school, potential
road(s) to decrease traffic on school
streets and surrounding roads and
most importantly open space for
our children,” Scalia wrote.
He added, “We have many
other reasons to support the
preservation of this property but
TALKS IN THE WORKS
TO PRESERVE 450 PASCACK ROAD?
BY MICHAEL OLOHAN
OF PASCACK PRESS
CONTINUED ON PAGE 22
M
M
M
MA
A
A
AR
R
R
RC
C
C
C’
’
’
’S
S
S
S D
D
D
DE
E
E
EL
L
L
LI
I
I
I &
&
&
& P
P
P
PI
I
I
IZ
Z
Z
ZZ
Z
Z
ZA
A
A
A
CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS
14 Park Ave., Park Ridge, NJ
(Next to Park Ridge High School)
(201) 391-4333
OPEN 7 DAYS
WE DELIVER!
www.marcsdeli.com
(Pick up only)
Only
$
599
$
599
1/2 Tray of Food,
Tossed Salad
and Bread
Pick-up only.
$
1999
$
1999
FEED A FAMILY OF FOUR! WOW!
ONLY
TAKE-OUT TUESDAY
WITH CURBSIDE PICKUP!
ITALIAN
COMBO HERO
ITALIAN
COMBO HERO
This
Week...Chicken Francese over Rice
VALID ANYTIME, ANY DAY THRU DECEMBER
KINCAIDFURNITURENANUET.COM • 8 4 5 - 6 2 7 - 2 2 0 7
HOLIDAY HOURS: FRIDAY NEW YEARS DAY 12-5 • SATURDAY 10-6 • SUNDAY 12-5
MON, TUES, THURS AND FRI BY APPOINTMENT
To confirm an appointment contact us at kincaidnanuet@gmail.com.
New Years
6
DECEMBER
28,
2020
•
PASCACK
VALLEY
PRESS
Rents starting at $700/month - All In!
RIDGEWOOD OFFICES AVAILABLE
for LEASE
RIDGEWOOD OFFICES AVAILABLE
for LEASE
“Not commuting into NYC anymore?”
“Find it challenging working from home?”
Work from Ridgewood: 10/20 Wilsey Square
We can build to suit - complimentary design fees
Call Stacey at 201.400.0122 for more info
Across from NJ Transit
500ft from Whole Foods
Work + Shop + Dine =
Ridgewood
MONTVALE
For most movie fans, 2020
has been difficult. Theaters have
closed, long-awaited releases have
been postponed, big-budget
movies made for big-screen view-
ing have gone straight to stream-
ing or pay-per-view platforms,
and the smell of fresh buttered
popcorn paired with the excite-
ment of seeing a blockbuster on
opening day is becoming a faint
memory.
Some movie theaters in the
Tri-State Area have opened with
safety measures in place—like
strict cleaning protocols, mask
mandates, social distancing obser-
vance, limitations on audience
size, and concession bans—the
lack of big releases and the fear of
being indoors with crowds of
strangers seems to have discour-
aged audiences.
With COVID cases back on
the rise, the possibility that some
movie theaters will be forced to
extend their closures or even shut
permanently for financial reasons
seems like something out of a hor-
ror or science fiction movie.
Recently, Hills students were
asked to complete a survey about
their moviegoing habits and
whether or not they miss the (pre-
pandemic) movie theater experi-
ence—or if they have found com-
parable alternatives for screen-
ings.
Of the students who respond-
ed, 15.3% attended movies regu-
larly (pre-pandemic), 57.6% said
they visited theaters sometimes,
25.4% said they went to the
movies rarely, and 1.7% said they
watched movies in theaters never.
When asked what they most
missed about going to the movie
theaters, the overwhelming major-
ity of respondents said they
missed “the whole experience: the
darkness, the big screen, the audi-
ence, the food, the trailers, the
ʻescape.ʼ”
Sophomore Josh Gura
explained, “I think that seeing
movies in the theater is much
more fun than at home. Itʼs cool to
feel like youʼre seeing a hit movie
before anyone else has seen it on
TV. Itʼs still nice that movies are
coming out on streaming services
in quarantine this year, but the
experience in the theater is much
more enjoyable.”
Typically, theaters are given
75 days to show a film before it
debuts on a streaming service.
Sending movies straight to
streaming may help studios finan-
cially, but it affects the movie-
going experience for fans.
Sophomore Jack Torrente
said he would rather watch a new
movie in a theater than on his
couch.
“I feel more connected to the
movie in a movie theater. But I
feel because of the circumstances
we are facing at the moment
streaming services are a good
middle ground,” he said.
When theaters closed at the
beginning of the pandemic, the
most popular alternatives for
respondentsʼ movie-watching
were streaming services: 91.5% of
the respondents relied on stream-
ing services such as Netflix, Hulu,
or Amazon Prime Video, only
8.5% relied on cable/satellite TV,
and none relied on drive-in the-
aters.
Of those who did attend
drive-in movies, the majority
noted that the movie was a re-
showing of an older release.
Sophomore Jordana Brief
was one of the few who attended a
drive-in movie.
“I thought it was an adaptive
change to viewing movies. I liked
the idea and concept. However,
due to the delay in new movies
coming out, the movie I was at
was Grease and the aspect I enjoy
the most when going to the movie
theaters is viewing new movies,”
Brief said.
Can streaming services sustain
the momentum?
Streaming services and
cable/satellite TV have definitely
stepped up to fill the void left by
darkened movie theaters, but itʼs
unclear whether or not they can
replace them.
The Hills students who said
they relied on streaming services
and cable/satellite TV for new
releases were asked if they think
the online and streaming plat-
forms will run out of content as
COVID cases rise again.
An overwhelming 69.5% of
students said, “No, if organiza-
tions like the NBA can create a
safe bubble, movie studios should
be able to do the same.”
30.5% said, “Yes, it is too dif-
ficult to keep a movie set COVID-
free.”
Movie studios are trying their
best to move forward with new
(pre-pandemic) projects and have
delayed others for theatrical
release, but time is money.
Movies such as The Batman
and Jurassic World: Dominion
tried to film with expensive and
strict COVID protocols in place,
but were still affected by positive
cases on set. While The Batman
is still in production, Jurassic
World: Dominion has finished
filming. Both releases have been
postponed and it will be interest-
ing to see if enough movie the-
aters will be open in time to show
to big audiences or if the movies
will go straight to streaming.
Torrente added that “A lot of
movie studios are saying that
they are focusing their revenue
into streaming services to make
back some of the money theyʼve
lost by not showing films in the-
aters.”
Christopher Nolanʼs long-
awaited big-budget movie Tenet
was originally delayed for the-
aters but then was only able to
open in a limited number of them
in the U.S. It failed to meet its
original projections, losing a ton
of money.
The movie was finally
released to home screens earlier
this month, but only via Blu-ray
and on-demand platforms. The
hope is that it will follow to a
streaming service soon.
Can we hope for movie
theaters to fully open and
return to business as usual?
According to Pamela
McClintock writing for holly-
woodreporter.com, nearly 30% of
U.S. consumers leading Holly-
wood marketing and research
firm NRG surveyed said they
didnʼt plan to return to the
movies until there was a vaccine.
Hills students seem to share
the feeling. When asked if they
would go to a theater that was
currently open (with safety meas-
ures in place), only 2.4% said,
“Yes, without hesitation.”
The larger 33.9% said “No,
Iʼm not comfortable with the
idea,” while 27.1% responded
that they would only go “for a
movie Iʼm excited to see.”
One respondent went as far
to say, “No, because it is unsafe
to be in a room with many people
who could be infected.” Another
said, “Itʼs torture to sit and have a
mask on for two hours when you
can sit at home without one and
watch [a movie].”
Media analyst Paul Der-
garabedian told McClintock for
another piece in the same outlet,
“COVID-19 has presented a
modern-era challenge unlike no
other and weathering this storm
will be no easy task, but if histo-
ry tells us anything itʼs that the
movie theater experience is an
essential component of the enter-
tainment ecosystem and thus will
find a way to survive.”
On Dec. 3, Warner Bros.
made an unexpected move and
announced that the studio would
Students miss movie theater
experience but fill the void
BY BEN HOFFMAN
OF THE TRAILBLAZER
CONTINUED ON PAGE 13
UNCLE FRANK’S
BARBER SHOP
UNCLE FRANK’S
BARBER SHOP
89 PARK AVE. • PARK RIDGE, NJ • 201-782-9060
89 PARK AVE. • PARK RIDGE, NJ • 201-782-9060
Rolled Back Price on Hot Shaves
Stop In And See Frank & Fred!
We offer Senior Discounts Wed. & Thurs.
TEMPORARY HOURS DURING VIRUS
TUESDAY-FRIDAY 8AM-4PM
SATURDAY 7AM-3PM
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
Reg. $25. With coupon only. Expires 1/31/21
$5.00 OFF

Recommended

TTN August 6, 2015.indd
TTN August 6, 2015.inddTTN August 6, 2015.indd
TTN August 6, 2015.inddCindy Tiley
 
Erika Duncan Reference Letter 2013
Erika Duncan Reference Letter 2013Erika Duncan Reference Letter 2013
Erika Duncan Reference Letter 2013Erika Duncan
 
Experience Osterville 2014 Guide - Osterville Cape Cod
Experience Osterville 2014 Guide - Osterville Cape CodExperience Osterville 2014 Guide - Osterville Cape Cod
Experience Osterville 2014 Guide - Osterville Cape Codcynders
 
ChronicleFall2010.pdf
ChronicleFall2010.pdfChronicleFall2010.pdf
ChronicleFall2010.pdfHRBExposed
 

More Related Content

Similar to PascackPress 12.28.20.pdf

Tidbits 1018 april 15
Tidbits 1018 april 15Tidbits 1018 april 15
Tidbits 1018 april 15Tidbits1
 
December 2013 Intermountain District Newsletter
December 2013 Intermountain District NewsletterDecember 2013 Intermountain District Newsletter
December 2013 Intermountain District NewsletterEmmett Nazarene Church
 
Experience Osterville 2015
Experience Osterville 2015Experience Osterville 2015
Experience Osterville 2015cynders
 
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdf
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdfPVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdf
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
16.12.15 fresh water cleveland - access
16.12.15   fresh water cleveland - access16.12.15   fresh water cleveland - access
16.12.15 fresh water cleveland - accesshmhollingsworth
 
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-dec
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-decVivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-dec
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-decPamela J. Watkins
 
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!wfbmom
 
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014Exchange Club of Fort Bend
 

Similar to PascackPress 12.28.20.pdf (20)

Tidbits 1018 april 15
Tidbits 1018 april 15Tidbits 1018 april 15
Tidbits 1018 april 15
 
chey 9-18-15
chey 9-18-15chey 9-18-15
chey 9-18-15
 
December 2013 Intermountain District Newsletter
December 2013 Intermountain District NewsletterDecember 2013 Intermountain District Newsletter
December 2013 Intermountain District Newsletter
 
Os nov scene
Os nov sceneOs nov scene
Os nov scene
 
SLO Toy Run
SLO Toy RunSLO Toy Run
SLO Toy Run
 
Experience Osterville 2015
Experience Osterville 2015Experience Osterville 2015
Experience Osterville 2015
 
Wolfhunt
WolfhuntWolfhunt
Wolfhunt
 
Katlynn Marina
Katlynn MarinaKatlynn Marina
Katlynn Marina
 
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdf
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdfPVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdf
PVP-Article_2022-09-05_Downloaded.pdf
 
Glade Announced
Glade AnnouncedGlade Announced
Glade Announced
 
16.12.15 fresh water cleveland - access
16.12.15   fresh water cleveland - access16.12.15   fresh water cleveland - access
16.12.15 fresh water cleveland - access
 
2009_Celebrations_Summer2
2009_Celebrations_Summer22009_Celebrations_Summer2
2009_Celebrations_Summer2
 
FirefighterPic-Dec2011
FirefighterPic-Dec2011FirefighterPic-Dec2011
FirefighterPic-Dec2011
 
ToysForTots-Aug2010
ToysForTots-Aug2010ToysForTots-Aug2010
ToysForTots-Aug2010
 
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-dec
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-decVivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-dec
Vivatysons magazine 2016 06 nov-dec
 
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!
Bay Ball 2014 - The BIG BANG - Live Auction!
 
Os jun scene
Os jun sceneOs jun scene
Os jun scene
 
Ap scene oct16
Ap scene oct16Ap scene oct16
Ap scene oct16
 
wood 7-3-15
wood 7-3-15wood 7-3-15
wood 7-3-15
 
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014
Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Club Newsletter July 28, 2014
 

More from Justin G Tsai

Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdf
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdfDec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdf
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdf
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdfSeton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdf
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Certificate in Business (600).pdf
Certificate in Business (600).pdfCertificate in Business (600).pdf
Certificate in Business (600).pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdf
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdfJustin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdf
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdf
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdfTheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdf
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdf
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdfGOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdf
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdfJustin G Tsai
 
Wtvac 2019-20 news articles
Wtvac 2019-20 news articlesWtvac 2019-20 news articles
Wtvac 2019-20 news articlesJustin G Tsai
 
Wtvac 2015-18 news articles
Wtvac 2015-18 news articlesWtvac 2015-18 news articles
Wtvac 2015-18 news articlesJustin G Tsai
 
Emt training records 2020-23
Emt training records 2020-23 Emt training records 2020-23
Emt training records 2020-23 Justin G Tsai
 
Emt training records 2015-20
Emt training records 2015-20Emt training records 2015-20
Emt training records 2015-20Justin G Tsai
 

More from Justin G Tsai (20)

0311PP00A001.pdf
0311PP00A001.pdf0311PP00A001.pdf
0311PP00A001.pdf
 
0311PP00A008.pdf
0311PP00A008.pdf0311PP00A008.pdf
0311PP00A008.pdf
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Sep_20__2018_.pdf
 
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdf
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdfDec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdf
Dec 2020 Cheerleader Article.pdf
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_.pdf
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Mar_7__2019_ (1).pdf
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Apr_12__2018_.pdf
 
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdfPascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdf
Pascack_Valley_Community_Life_Thu__Jan_28__2016_.pdf
 
2016_Swear_In.pdf
2016_Swear_In.pdf2016_Swear_In.pdf
2016_Swear_In.pdf
 
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdf
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdfSeton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdf
Seton Hall BSN Deans List Certificates.pdf
 
Certificate in Business (600).pdf
Certificate in Business (600).pdfCertificate in Business (600).pdf
Certificate in Business (600).pdf
 
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdf
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdfJustin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdf
Justin Tsai - Capt Rayve Rec Dec 2021.pdf
 
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdf
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdfTheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdf
TheRecordBergenEdition_20230209.pdf
 
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdf
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdfGOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdf
GOVERNORS_LETTER_NJ_APR2023.pdf
 
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf
201MAGJAN2023_ARTICLE-PAGES-JPEG-merged.pdf
 
Wtvac 2019-20 news articles
Wtvac 2019-20 news articlesWtvac 2019-20 news articles
Wtvac 2019-20 news articles
 
Wtvac 2015-18 news articles
Wtvac 2015-18 news articlesWtvac 2015-18 news articles
Wtvac 2015-18 news articles
 
Emt training records 2020-23
Emt training records 2020-23 Emt training records 2020-23
Emt training records 2020-23
 
Emt training records 2015-20
Emt training records 2015-20Emt training records 2015-20
Emt training records 2015-20
 
Emt letters
Emt lettersEmt letters
Emt letters
 

Recently uploaded

The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many guns
The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many gunsThe Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many guns
The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many gunsRappler
 
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive Polarisation
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive PolarisationIdentifying the Symptoms of Destructive Polarisation
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive PolarisationAxel Bruns
 
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[bhavenpr
 
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009Tom Tresser
 
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi Akeredolu
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi AkeredoluTimeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi Akeredolu
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi AkeredoluKayode Fayemi
 
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENT
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENTTHE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENT
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENTWayne Standiford
 
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against Antisemitism
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against AntisemitismMichael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against Antisemitism
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against AntisemitismEldar Iskenderov
 

Recently uploaded (7)

The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many guns
The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many gunsThe Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many guns
The Dutertes: Philippines’ political dynasty of many guns
 
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive Polarisation
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive PolarisationIdentifying the Symptoms of Destructive Polarisation
Identifying the Symptoms of Destructive Polarisation
 
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[
EGI-MEITY-Representation-1.pdf oproipjpwp[
 
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009
The "We Say No Games" Fight Song from 2009
 
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi Akeredolu
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi AkeredoluTimeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi Akeredolu
Timeless Aketi - Tribute to Arakunrin OluwaRotimi Akeredolu
 
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENT
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENTTHE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENT
THE FREEDOM REPORT USA OUR PAST AND PRESENT
 
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against Antisemitism
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against AntisemitismMichael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against Antisemitism
Michael Shvartsman: Philanthropy and Vigilance in the Fight Against Antisemitism
 

PascackPress 12.28.20.pdf

  • 1. FORTHE CORPS FORTHE CORPS Emerson • Hillsdale • Montvale • Park Ridge • River Vale • Township of Washington • Westwood • Woodcliff Lake P A S C A C K V A L L E Y ’ S B E S T H O M E T O W N N E W S P A P E R VOLUME 24 ISSUE 41 DECEMBER 28, 2020 Friends from Hillsdale and River Vale pooled their talents on Dec. 17 and gave rise to a “Coca- Cola” snow bear in Hillsdale’s Veterans Park. SEE PAGE 23 BUILD A BEAR The New York Evening World ran an item on Dec. 30, 1893 about fresh burglaries along the New Jersey and New York Railroad line, including at the stations in Westwood and Etna (Emerson). SEE PAGE 4 STELLAR STUDENT Westwood High’s Isabel Rhee earns prestigious Dwight D. Eisenhower Leadership Award. SEE PAGE 11 B ck in time... PHOTO BY WTVAC BY MICHAEL OLOHAN OF PASCACK PRESS A nearly 13-acre parcel previ- ously targeted for 73 townhomes at 463 Van Emburgh Ave.—with a development proposal expected in 2021—qualifies for a massive tax deduction due to its following a woodlands management plan for two years that cut its annual tax rate to about $50 annually in 2019 and 2020. However, should the property be developed, local officials say the landowner will need to repay the property taxes saved under the farm- land assessment law. At Township Attorney Ken Pollerʼs recommendation, the council on Dec. 21 tabled a resolution to refund 463 Van Emburgh Ave. (Tomaron Inc./Viviano) $12,572.51 for its payment of 2020ʼs first two quarterly tax bills. The council tabled the resolution Dec. 7 over concerns See TAX on page 254 MASSIVE TAX REFUND? Council seeks facts on ʻVivianoʼtimber sales TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON Continued on page 16 WESTWOOD / TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON Not seven swans a-swim- ming but rather seven Cardinals a-cheering! Going door to door, Junior Cardinals cheerleaders, whose program has merged those of the Westwood and Washington Township rec programs, surprised the Washington Township Volun- teer Ambulance Corps last week with gifts of Christmas wreaths: one per home and a larger one for the headquarters door. According to WTVAC Life Member Richard Miras, the crews have continued to ride and pro- vide ambulance service through- out the COVID pandemic.” “It was a very emotionally charged time for our members to be recognized and thanked by the cheerleaders, who traveled as a group to each of our homes to personally deliver the wreaths. Each of us had to make a deci- sion whether we would continue SPREADING JOY: Junior Cardinals cheerleaders Gina Castronova, Emma Claire Readie, Jenna Zotollo, Elorie Roberts, Maya Goldman, Elly DePiero, and Molly McGinty went to ambulance crew members’ homes to deliver wreaths and thanks. Cardinal cheerleaders deliver wreaths to COVID ambulance crews
  • 2. 2 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS In coordination with Rugged Outfitters, 89 Broadway in Park Ridge, Post 162 acquired a consid- erable supply of warm clothing, including thick hoodies, sweatpants, T-shirts, socks, underwear, gloves, and scarves. The post added knitted wool throws made by a local prayer shawl ministry. According to A.J. Luna, direc- tor of Veteran Services for Bergen County, speaking at the handoff of the clothes, “As winter approaches these supplies are desperately need- ed by the population they serve.” Post Trustee Phil Langner, who coordinated the project this year, said, “The strong bond that veterans share makes our participation in the program rewarding for our mem- bers, especially this year in the midst of the pandemic.” Thank you to all who con- tributed to make this effort a suc- cess. Commander Doug Frank American Legion Post 162 Emerson, the family town, delivers To the editor: I WOULD LIKE to extend special thanks to everyone in Emerson who went the extra mile to spread holiday cheer, including but not limited to: • The Emerson Recreation Commission, for hosting the First Annual Deck the Homes contest. Every street in town looks extra cheery this year thanks to this effort. • The Emerson Elementary PTA, for sending the Grinch and company around town to collect supplies for our elementary schools, spreading mischief and merriment along the way. • The Emerson Volunteer Fire Department, for escorting Santa and Mrs Claus on their annual hol- iday tour. Over three bitterly cold nights they ensured every street, no matter how narrow or short, got a visit from these special guests, and PASCACK PRESS LETTERSTOTHE EDITOR children all over rejoiced. Emerson is truly the Family Town. Thanks to all who gave of themselves to bring joy to others. I am very proud to live here. Kate Stutzel Emerson Hillsdale called out on jail issue To the editor: RECENT ATTENTION has been brought to Bergen County in response to a monthlong hunger strike undertaken by ICE detainees in the Bergen County Jail, in Hack- ensack. ICE detainees requested that they be released to fight their cases from the outside due to con- cerns around COVID-19 transmis- sion within the jail. The hunger strike was also in protest of inhumane conditions that detainees have been subjected to within the jail.Andrea Sáenz, attor- ney in charge of the New York Immigrant Family Unity Project (NYIFUP) for Brooklyn Defender Services, released a statement con- cerning this on Dec. 8, stating, “The people we represent have long reported negligent and dan- gerous conditions in ICE detention, only worsened by the pandemic, including solitary confinement, lack of basic sanitation, and inade- quate medical care. “In recent days, we have heard NOTE: Letter submission deadline is 11 a.m. Wednesday for the following Monday’s paper. Publication not guaranteed. Subject to editing. Email to pascackpress@thepressgroup.net. Warm hearts back county veterans To the editor: AMERICAN LEGION Post 162 of Hillsdale continued its support for the Bergen County veterans backpack program [the Jersey City-based not-for-profit Back- packs For Life] on Dec. 21, with a considerable donation of warm clothing. Although Bergen County was recognized by the White House for virtually eliminating homelessness in its veterans population and the program was considered a model for the nation to follow, the need to support veterans continues. CONTINUED ON PAGE 23 DRIVING SCHOOL INC. Lic. # 045-85N • Highly Respected, Full Service Driving School • Prep Lessons, 6 Hour Lessons & Road Tests • Experienced State Licensed Instructors Call Now to Schedule Your Appointment! 358 Kinderkamack Road, Westwood, NJ 201-666-4147 since 1978 201.775.0037 Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! Call Now For Free Estimates & Consults! EST. 2002 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES 10% OFF SNOW PLOWING SERVICES WITHTHISAD. NEW CLIENTS ONLY 201.775.0037 201.775.0037 201.775.0037 201.775.0037 201.775.0037 KAPLAN LANDSCAPING LLC. Commercial • Residential Snow Plowing • De-Icing • Sidewalks • Emergency Service LANDSCAPE SERVICE FOR 2021 KAPLAN LANDSCAPING LLC. 426 HILLSDALE AVE., HILLSDALE, NJ • (201)497-3997 $ 2Off YOUR HAIR CUT WITH AD • OFFER EXPIRES 1/31/21 STOP IN AND SEE TIM & RALPH! MEN’S CUTS $16 TIM’S BARBER SHOP TIM’S BARBER SHOP WE’RE BACK! NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY John’s Famous Bagels John’s Famous Bagels John’s Famous Bagels John’s Famous Bagels John’s Famous Bagels SUPERBAGELDEALS! SUPERBAGELDEALS! PARK RIDGE 183 Kinderkamack Rd • 201-930-4940 WOODCLIFF LAKE 94 Broadway • 201-746-6257 WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 ANY BREAKFAST CHOICE OF: Ham, Bacon, Taylor Ham or Sausage, Egg & Cheese On Bagel With Coffee $ 499 $ 499 $ 499 $ 499 $ 499 6 BAGELS 1/2lb. Cream Cheese $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 4 FREE BAGELS 4 FREE BAGELS 4 FREE BAGELS 4 FREE BAGELS 4 FREE BAGELS w/ Purchase of 12 Bagels WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 ANY LUNCH SANDWICH With Can Of Soda or Small Water $ 599 $ 599 $ 599 $ 599 $ 599 WEEKEND SPECIAL 6 Bagels, 1/4 lb. Nova, 1/2 lb. Plain Cream Cheese $ 1599 $ 1599 $ 1599 $ 1599 $ 1599 1 FREE MUFFIN 1 FREE MUFFIN 1 FREE MUFFIN 1 FREE MUFFIN 1 FREE MUFFIN w/ Purchase of 2 Muffins WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 WITH COUPON. CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXP. 1/31/21 Parking spaces at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church—at a cost of $2,500 per month—will not be need- ed for DPW vehicles as alternate locations were found, Mayor Peter Calamari reported at the Dec. 21 council meeting. Such parking became a hot topic in October when the council approved the mayor executing a $60,000 annual parking agreement with OLGC, although he continued to look for low- or no-cost options. Several council members cited the parking cost and contract provi- sions that required the township to snow plow, pave, and maintain the parking lot and nearby sidewalks as worrisome. The parking is needed because the DPW facility is planned for dem- olition and is under state deadline to remediate contaminated soil on site by May 2021. Calamari said Dec. 21 that up to six large DPW vehicles, such as garbage trucks and loaders, will be parked on a portion of Sherry Field, which is a permitted use under the stateʼs GreenAcres program. All local parks are subject to Green Acres regulations since state grant funds were accepted for improvements. Other DPW vehicles will be storedbehindValleyBank,initspark- ing lot, which was offered at no cost to the township. “We appreciate their kind gesture,” Calamari said. He said township-owned prop- erty at the end of HudsonAvenue will temporarily house two 12 foot by 24 foot residential-looking storage sheds that may remain until a new DPW building location is found. He thanked councilman Steven Cascio for suggesting the locationʼs use. Calamari said another “small piece” of township property will be used to construct a two-bay modular construction garage for DPW vehicle maintenance. Calamari said officials were still tryingtofindalocalsitetoaccommo- date a new DPW facility. In our letters section on Dec. 21, Calamari pushed back against ques- tions of ethics surrounding the town- shipʼs apparent fallback plan for the OLGC property. His father is an OLGC trustee and serves on the church finance committee. The mayor said negotiations were with theArchdiocese of Newark. — Michael Olohan DPW parking bound for Sherry Field, bank lot TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON
  • 3. JOHN NEUBAUER JOHN NEUBAUER JOHN NEUBAUER JOHN NEUBAUER JOHN NEUBAUER JOHN NEUBAUER AIR CONDITIONING • Sales • Service • Replacement • Maintenance • Space Pak • Unico Systems • Mini-Splits HEATING • Hot Air Furnaces • Humidifiers • Hot Water & Steam Boilers • Service Repair Replacement • Oil Service • Cleaning • Oil Tank Sales & Service • Oil to Gas Conversions ELECTRONIC WATER SOFTENERS HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, LLC RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 201-573-0526 • CELL 551-427-8397 SINCE 1980 FULLY INSURED & BONDED EMERGENCY SERVICE NJ Lic# 13VH00248400 • 19HC00582300 3 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS WOODCLIFF LAKE Despite more than $48,000 approved by the Borough Council in July for site remediation and environmental oversight at Galaxy Gardens—site of a future park— no remediation has been done mostly due to COVID-related staff shortages, said a local official. Administrator Tom Padilla said the 2.1-acre site, at Woodcliff Avenue and Werimus Road, was to have park designs presented this year, but itʼs now behind schedule. Officials had been hoping to complete remediation by the end of 2019. In late July, Padilla said he anticipated soil remediation work due to gasoline contamination to be completed in four weeks. On Dec. 7, Padilla said the soil remediation was not complet- ed due to staff Covid-19 outages at the boroughʼs licensed site reme- diation professional, First Envi- ronment. “They know this is a priority for us” said Padilla. He promised heʼll have weekly updates from First Environment to find out where the work stands. He told Pascack Press last week, “My concern is the weather will be changing and weʼll segue into some other delays.” The $48,000 soil remediation cost includes $31,525 to remove and replace 225 tons of soil and $17,100 for site monitoring. The borough already spent $355,600 on clearing, grading, and remediating the former garden center and gas station property. At risk due to delays is an approved $500,000 Bergen Coun- ty open space grant for park devel- opment. The funds will be released only when the site has been certified as meeting state environmental standards, Padilla said. Mayor Carlos Rendo broke a council tie vote, ultimately 4–3, in February 2018, allowing the $1.65 million site purchase. Residents and some officials opposed the deal in part because because of possible contamination stemming from from prior land uses. The site was also considered as a location for Valley Chabadʼs synagogue expansion. That effort foundered in part on contamina- tion concerns and municipal efforts to acquire the property. The borough also applied for a $341,000 county matching grant in July. Padilla said the boroughʼs contribution likely would come from its local Open Space fund, a bond issue, or corporate sponsor- ships. Moreover, the borough applied for a $167,000 county park development match grant in July to help pay for design and architectural services. If it comes through, the $341,000 county grant could be used for sidewalk installation, a gazebo, a flagpole, lighting, land- scaping, irrigation, monuments, signage, trash receptacles, and benches. GRANTS HANG IN BALANCE AS ‘GALAXY’ SITE CLEANUP STALLS BY MICHAEL OLOHAN OF PASCACK PRESS Make a difference in your com- munity.Volunteer to teach English as a Second Language. Since 1982, Literacy Volunteers of Pascack Valley has been training volunteers to teach English to adults in their community. This remote workshop is run by a certified trainer. The program is an accredited mem- ber of the national organization, Pro- literacy. Upon completion of the work- shop, LVPV will match the volunteer with an appropriate student. This workshop is open to resi- dentsofDumont,Emerson,Hillsdale, Mahwah, Montvale, Paramus, Park Ridge,Ramsey,RiverVale,andWest- wood. All tutoring is remote via Zoom, Facetime, WhatsApp, or phone. The workshop will cover the use of these technologies. Itʼs easy to register. Write to literacyvolunteerspv@gmail.com or visit literacyvolunteerspv.org/tutor-training- workshop-form.html. Learn to Teach English as a Second Language PASCACK VALLEY NEWEST MATERIALS • FINEST LABORERS • ON TIME SCHEDULING 201.791.7844 201.791.7844 201.791.7844 201.791.7844 FREE ESTIMATES MASTER LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379 4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ Family Owned & Operated Since 1938 ALL UNDER ONE ROOF 201.791.7844 KITCHENS & BATHS WWW.MASTERKITCHENSANDBATHS.COM NEW YEAR, NEW KITCHEN & BATH NEW YEAR, NEW KITCHEN & BATH NEW YEAR, NEW KITCHEN & BATH NEW YEAR, NEW KITCHEN & BATH NEW YEAR, NEW KITCHEN & BATH FREE SINK BASE WITH PURCHASE OF 12 CABINETS OR MORE FREE SINK BASE WITH PURCHASE OF 12 CABINETS OR MORE HOURS: MON / TUE / WED & FRI 9-5PM THUR 9-8PM SAT 10-2PM Family Owned & Operated Since 1938 ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Family Owned & Operated Since 1938 ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Family Owned & Operated Since 1938 ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Family Owned & Operated Since 1938 ALL UNDER ONE ROOF LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379 4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379 4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379 4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ LICENSE # 13VH01904500 • ELECTRIC LIC. # 13805 • PLUMBING LIC. # NJ 6379 4-21 BANTA PLACE • FAIRLAWN, NJ
  • 4. MAILING ADDRESS: P.O. BOX 335 Westwood, N.J. 07675 Serving Emerson, Hillsdale, Montvale, Park Ridge, River Vale, Township of Washington, Westwood and Woodcliff Lake The articles and opinions printed in Pascack Press are not necessarily those of the publisher. Pascack Press is neither liable nor responsible for typo- graphical errors. This publication contains material developed independently by Pascack Press. It may not be reproduced, in whole or in part. Pascack Press is published in Westwood and is distributed to every household in our circulation area. EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING 201.664.2105 FAX 201.664.2109 E-MAIL US AT pascackpress@thepressgroup.net P A S C A C K V A L L E Y ’ S H O M E T O W N N E W S P A P E R Publisher John J. DeFina Editor John Snyder Assistant Editor Kristin Beuscher Art Director Keith J. Harcher Director of Advertising George F. Harcher LETTERS 2 EATS DINING 11 LIBRARY CALENDAR 12 HEALTH & WELLNESS 17 HOMEIMPROVEMENT 22 REALESTATE 23 SERVICES 27 OBITUARIES 30 inside 4 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY IN THE PASCACK PRESS. B ck in time... B ck in time... This item appeared in the New York Evening World on Saturday, Dec. 30, 1893. The previous night, burglars worked their way down the New Jersey and New York Railroad line, hitting the stations in West- wood and Etna (Emerson), among others. Seven of the New Jersey and New York Railroad stations, between Hillsdale and Hackensack, were visited by burglars last night. Automatic weighing machines were broken open, the money bags cut off with a knife, and the contents carried away. Ticket cases were broken open, tickets were scat- tered over the floors and express packages were rifled. The greater part of the money obtained was from the weighing-machines. The stations broken open were: Central Avenue, Hackensack; Cherry Hill; River Edge; New Milford; Oradell; Etna; and West- wood. The thieves secured the most booty at Oradell. Besides taking the money from the weighing-machine they took a package that contained a suit of clothes belonging to F.F. Bulkley, and broke open a package of fancy goods belonging to a Mrs. Scott. William Covert, a brakeman on a freight train, found a box of writing paper and a womanʼs stocking, supposed to have been taken from the package of Mrs. Scott and dropped by the burglars in their hurry. For the last three years the stations on the lower end of the road have been broken into once a year regularly, and some of them oftener, especially Central Avenue, which has been entered three or four times over the past year. Museum’s saleisnow openfor members PASCACK VALLEY Due to the governorʼs latest executive order limiting indoor gatherings to 10 people or fewer, the Pascack Historical Society has had to change course for its Holi- day Boutique and Curio Sale. For now, the usual sale is being postponed until the spring. However, because so many dona- tions have come in, the museum is opening up the sale exclusively to its members by appointment in the coming weeks. Time slots are available on Wednesday mornings and Sunday afternoons. If you are a Pascack Histori- cal Society member, email info@pascackhistoricalsociety.or g to arrange a time to shop (feel free to bring your immediate fam- ily, or a friend). The thousands of sale items include antiques, collectibles, hol- iday decor, artwork, books, vin- tage jewelry, handbags (from 1950s to designer), china, small furniture, brand new toys, and so much more. For those who arenʼt mem- bers, now is the perfect time to join. Annual dues start at $30. If you sign up now, your dues will cover the 2021 year. Membership also entitles you to receive the Societyʼs quarterly newsletter, “RELICS,” which is full of local history features. The Pascack Historical Soci- ety is at 19 Ridge Ave., Park Ridge. The museum is open to visitors every Sunday from 1–4 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit pascackhistoricalsociety.org, call (201) 573-0307, and follow the museum on Facebook. THIS WEEK IN LOCAL HISTORY: Burglars make year-end stops in Westwood, Etna THE WESTWOOD STATION (top) and Etna station (bottom) at the turn of the 20th century. Both stations were built when the railroad first came through the Pascack Valley in 1870. This original Westwood station was made of wood and stood on Broadway on the opposite side of the tracks from the current station. The photo also shows a row of buildings that once stood in what is now Veterans Memorial Park. Etna’s station still stands off Kinderkamack Road, although it now has a brick facade. The borough was renamed Emerson in 1909. THE HEADLINE from the Dec. 30, 1893 New York Evening World article about local train station burglaries. Note the antiquated use of the term “slot machine,” which had nothing to do with gambling. The term referred to any coin-operated vending machine—in this case, weighing machines.
  • 5. DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS 5 TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON Mayor Peter Calamari said on Dec. 21 that he planned to update residents within weeks about possi- ble negotiations and legal options regarding the 3.2-acre tract at 450 Pascack Road. The property owner, still advertising for commercial interest in the land, has neighbors who have been pressing the council to swoop in while they can. At the Dec. 21 council meet- ing, Council President Stacey Feeney noted that “anything thatʼs negotiated behind the scenes cannot be spoken about until some sort of agreement has come.” Calamari would not confirm whether negotiations with Robert Morris, whose family owns 450 Pascack Road, or developer Nick Tsapatsaris of Lakos Construction, with whom Morris evidently is working, were ongoing. He said he would have more information in mid-January 2021. In early December, resident Joseph Scalia offered the governing body four reasons why officials need to “finally act on behalf of its residents” and preserve the mostly wooded private property. Scalia is one of three Ridge- wood Boulevard East homeowners pressing the Township Council for action while the land is available. Earlier this fall, Scalia along with Michael Proto and Brian Sin- clair, hired attorney Charles H. Sarlo to represent them to the mayor and council, urging “imme- diate and affirmative action…to preserve 450 Pascack Road from further development.” An Oct. 19 email from the res- idents called on the township to either take the property at fair mar- ket value through eminent domain or rezone “a majority” of the tract as open space/recreational zone. The land abuts Memorial Field. The council took no action. Pascack Press has requested a copy of official correspondence related to the matter. The council took to closed session Dec. 7 to hear options on 450 Pascack Road from the town planner and attorney. Scaliaʼs recent email notes that about two months ago more than 10 families met with local officials to discuss the situation and said his email is “a reminder why 450 Pas- cack Road is critical for the town today and for tomorrow to preserve from development.” The email cites four reasons, including “the safety of our chil- dren,” with Washington Elementary School next door; the felling of more than 200 “mature trees”; and related stormwater impacts such as flooding and sediment runoff. Other issues include possible homes or huge retaining walls over- looking Memorial Field as well as the possibility of future residentsʼ complaints limiting Memorial Field activities. “We must preserve 450 Pas- cack for future needs, expansion of our facilities, school, potential road(s) to decrease traffic on school streets and surrounding roads and most importantly open space for our children,” Scalia wrote. He added, “We have many other reasons to support the preservation of this property but TALKS IN THE WORKS TO PRESERVE 450 PASCACK ROAD? BY MICHAEL OLOHAN OF PASCACK PRESS CONTINUED ON PAGE 22 M M M MA A A AR R R RC C C C’ ’ ’ ’S S S S D D D DE E E EL L L LI I I I & & & & P P P PI I I IZ Z Z ZZ Z Z ZA A A A CATERING FOR ALL OCCASIONS 14 Park Ave., Park Ridge, NJ (Next to Park Ridge High School) (201) 391-4333 OPEN 7 DAYS WE DELIVER! www.marcsdeli.com (Pick up only) Only $ 599 $ 599 1/2 Tray of Food, Tossed Salad and Bread Pick-up only. $ 1999 $ 1999 FEED A FAMILY OF FOUR! WOW! ONLY TAKE-OUT TUESDAY WITH CURBSIDE PICKUP! ITALIAN COMBO HERO ITALIAN COMBO HERO This Week...Chicken Francese over Rice VALID ANYTIME, ANY DAY THRU DECEMBER KINCAIDFURNITURENANUET.COM • 8 4 5 - 6 2 7 - 2 2 0 7 HOLIDAY HOURS: FRIDAY NEW YEARS DAY 12-5 • SATURDAY 10-6 • SUNDAY 12-5 MON, TUES, THURS AND FRI BY APPOINTMENT To confirm an appointment contact us at kincaidnanuet@gmail.com. New Years
  • 6. 6 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS Rents starting at $700/month - All In! RIDGEWOOD OFFICES AVAILABLE for LEASE RIDGEWOOD OFFICES AVAILABLE for LEASE “Not commuting into NYC anymore?” “Find it challenging working from home?” Work from Ridgewood: 10/20 Wilsey Square We can build to suit - complimentary design fees Call Stacey at 201.400.0122 for more info Across from NJ Transit 500ft from Whole Foods Work + Shop + Dine = Ridgewood MONTVALE For most movie fans, 2020 has been difficult. Theaters have closed, long-awaited releases have been postponed, big-budget movies made for big-screen view- ing have gone straight to stream- ing or pay-per-view platforms, and the smell of fresh buttered popcorn paired with the excite- ment of seeing a blockbuster on opening day is becoming a faint memory. Some movie theaters in the Tri-State Area have opened with safety measures in place—like strict cleaning protocols, mask mandates, social distancing obser- vance, limitations on audience size, and concession bans—the lack of big releases and the fear of being indoors with crowds of strangers seems to have discour- aged audiences. With COVID cases back on the rise, the possibility that some movie theaters will be forced to extend their closures or even shut permanently for financial reasons seems like something out of a hor- ror or science fiction movie. Recently, Hills students were asked to complete a survey about their moviegoing habits and whether or not they miss the (pre- pandemic) movie theater experi- ence—or if they have found com- parable alternatives for screen- ings. Of the students who respond- ed, 15.3% attended movies regu- larly (pre-pandemic), 57.6% said they visited theaters sometimes, 25.4% said they went to the movies rarely, and 1.7% said they watched movies in theaters never. When asked what they most missed about going to the movie theaters, the overwhelming major- ity of respondents said they missed “the whole experience: the darkness, the big screen, the audi- ence, the food, the trailers, the ʻescape.ʼ” Sophomore Josh Gura explained, “I think that seeing movies in the theater is much more fun than at home. Itʼs cool to feel like youʼre seeing a hit movie before anyone else has seen it on TV. Itʼs still nice that movies are coming out on streaming services in quarantine this year, but the experience in the theater is much more enjoyable.” Typically, theaters are given 75 days to show a film before it debuts on a streaming service. Sending movies straight to streaming may help studios finan- cially, but it affects the movie- going experience for fans. Sophomore Jack Torrente said he would rather watch a new movie in a theater than on his couch. “I feel more connected to the movie in a movie theater. But I feel because of the circumstances we are facing at the moment streaming services are a good middle ground,” he said. When theaters closed at the beginning of the pandemic, the most popular alternatives for respondentsʼ movie-watching were streaming services: 91.5% of the respondents relied on stream- ing services such as Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Prime Video, only 8.5% relied on cable/satellite TV, and none relied on drive-in the- aters. Of those who did attend drive-in movies, the majority noted that the movie was a re- showing of an older release. Sophomore Jordana Brief was one of the few who attended a drive-in movie. “I thought it was an adaptive change to viewing movies. I liked the idea and concept. However, due to the delay in new movies coming out, the movie I was at was Grease and the aspect I enjoy the most when going to the movie theaters is viewing new movies,” Brief said. Can streaming services sustain the momentum? Streaming services and cable/satellite TV have definitely stepped up to fill the void left by darkened movie theaters, but itʼs unclear whether or not they can replace them. The Hills students who said they relied on streaming services and cable/satellite TV for new releases were asked if they think the online and streaming plat- forms will run out of content as COVID cases rise again. An overwhelming 69.5% of students said, “No, if organiza- tions like the NBA can create a safe bubble, movie studios should be able to do the same.” 30.5% said, “Yes, it is too dif- ficult to keep a movie set COVID- free.” Movie studios are trying their best to move forward with new (pre-pandemic) projects and have delayed others for theatrical release, but time is money. Movies such as The Batman and Jurassic World: Dominion tried to film with expensive and strict COVID protocols in place, but were still affected by positive cases on set. While The Batman is still in production, Jurassic World: Dominion has finished filming. Both releases have been postponed and it will be interest- ing to see if enough movie the- aters will be open in time to show to big audiences or if the movies will go straight to streaming. Torrente added that “A lot of movie studios are saying that they are focusing their revenue into streaming services to make back some of the money theyʼve lost by not showing films in the- aters.” Christopher Nolanʼs long- awaited big-budget movie Tenet was originally delayed for the- aters but then was only able to open in a limited number of them in the U.S. It failed to meet its original projections, losing a ton of money. The movie was finally released to home screens earlier this month, but only via Blu-ray and on-demand platforms. The hope is that it will follow to a streaming service soon. Can we hope for movie theaters to fully open and return to business as usual? According to Pamela McClintock writing for holly- woodreporter.com, nearly 30% of U.S. consumers leading Holly- wood marketing and research firm NRG surveyed said they didnʼt plan to return to the movies until there was a vaccine. Hills students seem to share the feeling. When asked if they would go to a theater that was currently open (with safety meas- ures in place), only 2.4% said, “Yes, without hesitation.” The larger 33.9% said “No, Iʼm not comfortable with the idea,” while 27.1% responded that they would only go “for a movie Iʼm excited to see.” One respondent went as far to say, “No, because it is unsafe to be in a room with many people who could be infected.” Another said, “Itʼs torture to sit and have a mask on for two hours when you can sit at home without one and watch [a movie].” Media analyst Paul Der- garabedian told McClintock for another piece in the same outlet, “COVID-19 has presented a modern-era challenge unlike no other and weathering this storm will be no easy task, but if histo- ry tells us anything itʼs that the movie theater experience is an essential component of the enter- tainment ecosystem and thus will find a way to survive.” On Dec. 3, Warner Bros. made an unexpected move and announced that the studio would Students miss movie theater experience but fill the void BY BEN HOFFMAN OF THE TRAILBLAZER CONTINUED ON PAGE 13 UNCLE FRANK’S BARBER SHOP UNCLE FRANK’S BARBER SHOP 89 PARK AVE. • PARK RIDGE, NJ • 201-782-9060 89 PARK AVE. • PARK RIDGE, NJ • 201-782-9060 Rolled Back Price on Hot Shaves Stop In And See Frank & Fred! We offer Senior Discounts Wed. & Thurs. TEMPORARY HOURS DURING VIRUS TUESDAY-FRIDAY 8AM-4PM SATURDAY 7AM-3PM NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY Reg. $25. With coupon only. Expires 1/31/21 $5.00 OFF
  • 7. DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS 7 201.284.9497 allbrightecowash.com • Gutter Installation & Repairs • Soft Washing • Roof Installation & Repairs Call Now For Your Free Estimate! Call Now For Your Free Estimate! Call Now For Your Free Estimate! Call Now For Your Free Estimate! Call Now For Your Free Estimate! Call Now For Your Free Estimate! RIVERVALE, NJ Lic# 13VH090443900 Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning Power Washing & Gutter Cleaning ANY JOB ANY JOB ANY JOB ANY JOB ANY JOB ANY JOB 10% OFF 10% OFF 10% OFF 10% OFF 10% OFF 10% OFF PROFESSIONALS Marion Lorenzo, ACSW, LCSW (201) 666-1241 N.J. Licensed Clinical Social Worker Providing Counseling & Psychotherapy, Individuals, Couples & Families, Anxiety, Depression, Co-Dependency Relationships, Loss, Self Esteem “Be The Best You Can Be” SEE MAYOR PAGE 31 WE HAVE USH- ERED IN the 2020 holiday season of “com- fort and joy” with fear and t r e p i d a t i o n . COVID-19 was the biological black cloud that relentlessly shadowed our spirit. The season when we normally come together to eat, drink, and be merry was riven by rising COVID counts and the necessity to mask, cleanse, and be separate. Our shared, unifying traditions were put on hold, abbreviated, or digitized and sterilized for virtual consumption. (A virtual hug or remote exchanges of “peace be with you” leave much to be desired.) Between the daily counts, we watched on the news as in nearby New York City, tradition after tradi- tion was either canceled or decon- structed beyond recognition: The 4th of July fireworks were canceled. The reminiscent, and his- torically insistent, twin towers of light were almost abandoned this Sept. 11. The live Macyʼs Thanks- giving Day Parade was canceled and the day itself was reduced to a tightly managed head count: the 10- person-to-a-home maximum, potentially putting “the kiddie table” outside in the driveway. Nei- ther Hanukkah nor Christmas, nor New Yearʼs Eve celebrations would be spared the makeover of misery that is COVID-19ʼs version of “can- cel culture.” Christmas trees are supposed to be as brides: each one beautiful in its own way. But the tree delivered to Rockefeller Center this year looked like a bride whose wedding day hair was done by PSEG tree trimmers! And once decorated, it could only be viewed up close by appointment, in limited blocks of time: tick-tock goes the COVID clock, shredding joy and deforming traditions. But rather than be disheartened about this past year I urge you to look a bit closer to home and to remember what the people, and vol- unteers, of Westwood did when handed the toxic lemon that is COVID-19:You got busy. In April, when the virus kept the Easter Bunny in its hutch, and the annual egg hunt in Veterans Memorial Park was canceled due to pandemic protocols, you took the Easter Bunny on a socially dis- tanced road trip through every part of town. Our stressed-out par- ents—and cooped up children- enjoyed a moment of serendipity in the midst of our COVID chaos. When Memorial Dayʼs annual parade down Westwood Avenue (our own modest “Canyon of Heroes”) would violate the gover- norʼs orders limiting an outdoor eventʼs maximum capacity, our vet- erans held a small wreath ceremony at the War Memorial. Afterward, you caravaned them throughout town. They received well-deserved cheers from West- wood residents of all ages, some who mightnʼt otherwise have made it to our traditional parade. And when our businesses were drowning under the fiscal pressure of the pandemic, you supported them and breathed life into the downtown with performers, enter- taining on every street corner. You willed the downtown out of its COVID coma withArts on the Avenues. Meanwhile, those same businesses gave back to our com- munity with countless meals to families in need and frontline heroes. Boots and Badges got done as well, in early September instead of April, and the benefit tournament actually made more money for Lebanon Baptist Church this year—when many of us were financially stressed—than in past years during “good times.” When COVID-19 restrictions killed the Ambulance Corpsʼannu- al carnival fundraiser, you switched gears and sponsored drive-in movie nights: The “novel” coron- avirus, stiff-armed by an iconic “old school” entertainment! M Ma ay yo or r A Ar rr ro oy yo o l la au ud ds s ‘ ‘h hu ub b’ ’ t to ow wn n’ ’s s 2 20 02 20 0 h he er ro o: : ‘ ‘Y Yo ou u’ ’ WESTWOOD ARROYO 603 BROADWAY • WESTWOOD, NJ • 201-358-8488 MEN • WOMEN • CHILDREN Only The Cutting Zone Hair Designer Holiday Special FACE FRAME HIGHLIGHTS $ 45 FACE FRAME HIGHLIGHTS $ 45 Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 1/7/21 Safe For People, Pets And Planet! Eco-Friendly & All-Natural ———————— Allergen & Toxin Free ———————— Color Coded Cleaning System That Prevents Cross Contamination ———————— Cleaning Products Certified By Green Seal & EPA Safer Choice Start The Year Off With A Clean Sanitized Home! Serving Bergen County Professionally Trained Staff Fully Bonded & Insured CALL TODAY(201)713-5380 and get a FREE quote! ecomaids.com 25%OFF FIRSTTIME CLEANING SERVICE E EC CO OM MA AI ID DS S • •2 20 01 1- -7 71 13 3- -5 53 38 80 0 Coupon valid thru 2/1/21 sign on. With this coupon. Not valid with any other offers or prior purchase. 64-Point Cleaning Checklist Certified Covid-19 disinfecting on all household touchpoints ———————— We Bring All Cleaning Equipment & Products To You ———————— Disinfectant Fogging For Home Or Business BIG SAVINGS! PARKRIDGEPHARMACY *Locally owned family business JOIN OUR FAMILY TODAY! 40 Park Ave Unit #5, Park Ridge, NJ Quick prescription transfer to us PRESCRIPTIONS • OVER THE COUNTER MEDS PET MEDS • COMPOUNDING 201-554-2200 contact@parkridgepharmacy.com NOW OFFERING SAME DAY RAPID COVID-19 TESTING! & PCR TEST. CALL FOR INFO. NOW OFFERING SAME DAY RAPID COVID-19 TESTING! & PCR TEST. CALL FOR INFO. MASKS • GLOVES • SANITIZER ANTIBACTERIAL WIPES • CLEANING SUPPLIES At Low Competitive Prices!
  • 8. 8 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS The Hillsdale Department of Public Works has opened the Recycling Center on a limited basis each week on Monday and Thursdays from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Residents are required to wear a mask or face covering to enter the recycling area and must maintain social distancing guide- lines. You must have a resident sticker to gain entry. RECYLING CENTER OPEN TWICE WEEKLY Club News? Let us help promote your club or organization. Send all news to pascackpress@thepressgroup.net or mail to: Pascack Press, P.O. Box 335, Westwood, NJ 07675 Should you replace your tooth with a dental implant or not? How do you answer that question? You should replace your tooth with a dental implant if no other treatment option can save your tooth. To replace your tooth should be the last option considered. A dental implant is a replacement option, not a treatment option. I am Dr. Priyu Gupta, Board Certified Periodontist and Dental Implant Surgeon. A periodontist is a dental implant surgeon specializ- ing in the gum and bone, the sup- porting structures of your teeth. A periodontist is a dental surgeon, not an oral surgeon. An oral surgeon is vastly trained outside of the oral cavity. They can perform extensive proce- dures like jaw reconstructions and even treat oral cancer.A periodontist is a surgeon of the teeth and only trained to save them or replace them with dental implants. My specialty, periodontics, is more specific to sav- ing teeth and dental implant therapy. During my surgical training, the question, “Should we save the tooth or replace with an implant?” was always asked of me. My profes- sorsʼ intent was to challenge my thinking and ability to grow as a periodontist. We were taught that a dental implant is the last resort to therapy when all other options have been considered. During training to be a peri- odontist, we are taught many forms of therapy to salvage natural teeth suffering from gum and bone dis- eases. That is the purpose of a peri- odontist. There are several options for managing and maintaining declining teeth. For instance, lost gum and bone on teeth can be regenerated to make them stronger. Or, if the teeth have gotten loose, a periodontist can stabilize the occlusion and control disease to delay tooth loss. This is the salient difference between an oral surgeon and a peri- odontist. Periodontists are the only spe- cialists recognized by the American Dental Association (ADA) as a dental implant surgeon. Many spe- cialties and even general dentists have incorporated this within the services they provide, but only peri- odontists have the formal education and training. Most of my practice is dental implant surgery, and the remaining is focused on surgical therapy to save teeth. Before you opt for replacement, it is best to get an opinion from a periodontal surgeon who may be able to save your natural teeth. For more information, call (201) 664-3023, visit us at 354 Old Hook Road #201 in Westwood, or visit WestwoodPeriodontics.com. Should you replace your tooth with a dental implant or not? How do you answer that question? PRIYU GUPTA, DDS, WESTWOOD PERIODONTICS Hillsdale Vision Center www.hillsdalevisioncenter.com 185 Broadway, Hillsdale, NJ • 201-666-0230 • Comprehensive Eye Exams • Treatment and Management of Ocular Diseases • Contact Lens Fittings • Assortment of Eyewear Dr. Adam Gardner, Optometrist We accept most major medical and vision plans. Registration for Emerson pre- kindergarten and kindergarten children who expect to enter school in September 2021 will be held online Feb. 1–5. Onsite registration, by appointment only, will be held on Thursday, Feb. 4 from 9 to 11 a.m. and 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Memorial School. To be eligible for pre-kinder- garten, a child must be 4 on or before Oct. 1, 2021. For kinder- garten, a child must be 5 on or before Oct. 1, 2021. Emerson Public Schools enjoys a full-day kindergarten pro- gram. Depending on registration, a full-day tuition-based pre-K pro- gram may be offered. For registration information and materials, visit http://memorial.emersonschools.org. Click Pre-Kindergarten/Kinder- garten Registration. Residents unable to register online may call Mrs. Berg at Memorial Elemen- tary School at (201) 599-7580. K, pre-k registration for public schools EMERSON DR. PRIYU GUPTA BOARD CERTIFIED PERIODONTIST AND DENTAL IMPLANT SURGEON (Highest Qualifications) Leave it to the Specialists for your dental implants! 354 OLD HOOK ROAD WESTWOOD, NJ • www.westwoodperiodontics.com We are the leading practice in Bergen County for dental implant therapy and treating all forms of Gum Disease. Serving the community for 25 Years. 201-664-3023
  • 10. 10 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY IN THE PASCACK PRESS. Deck the Homes winners EMERSON CONGRATULATIONS TO the first-, second-, and third-place winners of the Emerson Recreation Commission’s first annual Deck the Homes compe- tition. Pictured is Stella Fullam, for the Fullam family, first place winners, showing off a spectac- ular 72 Jefferson Ave. Second place was awarded to 111 Dyer Ave. Third place went to 67 Lexington Ave. There were five honorable mentions: 87 Dorchester Road, 152 Pascack Ave., 256 Birch St., 129 Palisade Ave., and 209 Colonial Road. The commission told Pascack Press that it had 52 par- ticipants, exceeding expecta- tions. “We hope to see many more next year,” said presiding officer Paul Coombes. Photo courtesy ERC The Hillsdale Police Depart- ment on Dec. 22 announced the ongoing investigation into an eluding incident that occurred on Dec. 15. On this date, the Hillsdale Police Department received a “be on the lookout” (BOLO) from nearby Tri-Boro dispatch in refer- ence to an African American male operating a dark Ford Explorer bearing a Florida registration that was just involved in several thefts from motor vehicles in Woodcliff Lake. A short while later a Hills- dale police officer located that vehicle traveling south on Kin- derkamack Road at a high rate of speed. The officer conducted a motor vehicle stop. As the officer approached the vehicle, the sus- pect accelerated and fled from the stop. The suspect vehicle was involved in two crashes and con- tinued to drive recklessly while fleeing the area. No injuries to motorists were reported. As a result of the investiga- tion, a warrant for eluding in the second degree has been issued for Khalil D. Pass, 26. Anyone with further information is asked to contact the Hillsdale Police Detective Bureau, (201) 664-4200 ext 1575. The Hillsdale Police Depart- ment thanks the Fort Lauderdale Police Department for its assis- tance and remind all to lock your vehicles and report suspicious activity to law enforcement. Suspect in thefts flees stop; police seek leads HILLSDALE Khalil D. Pass $ 15Gift BOOK NOW marijanahairandcolor.com Open 7 Days a week Walk-ins Welcome 267 Center Ave., Westwood, NJ 2 20 01 1. .4 49 97 7. .5 57 77 75 5 Offer available for Mon., Tues. & Thurs. Only 10am-7pm Must be booked online with code 14 Cannot be combined. (Hair Color Service Only) Patricia J. Villano Certified Public Accountant, LLC Accredited Estate Planner® BEWARE: New Year - New Tax Laws! Closter, NJ www.villano-cpa.com @PJVCPA (201) 768-5010
  • 11. 11 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS eatsDining &Cooking Guide Congratulations to township resident Isabel Rhee, attending Westwood Regional High School, who was selected this year for the prestigious Dwight D. Eisenhower Leadership Award, sponsored by the West Point Society of New Jersey. This award is for a student who exhibits exceptional performance in academics, athletics, community service, good citizenship, and lead- ership We reached out to school prin- cipal Frank Connelly for a summary of Isabelʼs accomplishments. What he sent back is comprehensive and wonderful: Unlike most Korean children, Isabel never attended a Korean school or grew up speaking Korean in her household, so she could never have any type of lasting conversation with her grandparents. This led her to learn and study the Korean language by herself; by watching Korean shows, listening to Korean music, and taking advantage of free online resources, she has become proficient in Korean com- prehension and conversation. She also never attended SAT tutoring, preferring to prepare for the SAT by herself. Her drive to succeed is evident in everything that Isabel does. She has worked diligently in a demanding academic program and is enjoying the challenges in her five advanced placement classes and one honors class. Her teachers find her to be a positive role model in the classroom, always contributing to discussions and helping her classmates. Sheʼs an AP Scholar with excellent time- management skills. A member of the National Honor Society and the English, his- tory, and math honor societies, Isabel is the co-president of the Science Honor Society, an officer of the Environmental Club, assistant coach of her synchronized swim- ming team, and a leader of her churchʼs youth group. In the Science Honor Society, she prepares monthly meetings and is gearing up to lead a discussion group. Isabel has been a competitive synchronized swimmer for the past eight years. She has qualified for the Junior Olympics with her team for the past two years, and just last year her team qualified for nationals (however, due to the pandemic, the competition was postponed indefi- nitely). Isabel also had the opportunity to train at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid for a week with other girls in the Northeast. She is the New Jersey Associa- tion Senior Representative, which means that she was voted by her state to attend the USA Swimming Convention in St. Louis (2019) as well as the Virtual Convention in 2020. Only one representative is chosen to represent the state of New Jersey and she was able to vote on official issues as the selected athlete. Isabel also received the Scholar Athlete Award, which recognizes competitive swimmers with high GPAs. Volunteering her time in her church is very important to Isabel. During the summer of 2019 she went on a mission trip with her church to Maneadero, Mexico, where she ran vacation bible study programs for young children and helped the community in many other areas. Isabel possesses innate intelli- gence, maturity, and natural leader- ship ability so seldom seen in stu- dents her age. The West Point Society of New Jersey sponsors a number of high schools throughout New Jersey. Each year, these high schools select a high school junior who exhibits exceptional performance and poten- tial in the areas of academics, athlet- ics, community service, good citi- zenship, and leadership. Students selected to receive this award are presented an individual plaque and a letter of recognition. Presentation is made by a mem- ber of the West Point Society of New Jersey during an awards cer- emony at the high school. The recipient, as well as his or her family and guidance coun- selor, are invited to West Point for a Leadership Awards Recognition Day cosponsored by the West Point Parents Club and the West Point Society of New Jersey. The society lists the follow- ing past winners from Westwood Regional High School: 2001 John Ten Hoeve 2002 Daniel Jarem 2003 Jessica M. Bochner 2004 Alexandra K. Glaser 2005 Walter J. Joseph 2006 John M. Garland 2007 Christopher B. Murphy 2008 Tara A. Keegan 2009 Gabriel Mena 2010 Warren Saunders 2011 Evan McLaughlin 2012 Amanda Pirola 2013 Jessica Potestivo 2014 Katherine Kalish 2015 Alina Kalfaian — Staff report Isabel Rhee, one to watch, earns Eisenhower Leadership Award TOWNSHIP OF WASHINGTON Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 1/7/21 SPEND $5 OR MORE,GET 2FREEBAGELS Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 1/7/21 $ 3999 +TAX HOLIDAY BONANZA! 1/2 lb. Nova, 1/2 lb. Whitefish or Tuna Salad, 1/2 lb. Plain Cream Cheese & 1 Dozen Bagels ONLY Visit Our Other Locations! CLOSTER & NORTHVALE BAGELS&CAFE 504 Livingston St., NORWOOD 201-767-7111 187 River Vale Rd., RIVER VALE 201-664-5444 Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 1/7/21 10% OFF$10OR MORE USE CARD DAILY. NOV. 2020 - NOV. 2021 Valid Mon.-Fri. Excludes Holidays. With coupon or pic on phone. Not to be combined with any other offer. Exp. 1/7/21 $ 2OFF ANY $5 PURCHASE HOLIDAY CATERING OFFERS AMERICAN CUISINE AND FLAVORES FROM AROUND THE WORLD, SPECIALIZING IN HOMESTYLE COMFORT FOODS, HEARTY AND HEALTY SALADS, BURGERS, SANDWICHES, SOUPS & STEWS. SINCE 1980 301 Center Ave. Westwood, NJ TAKEOUT / CURBSIDE PICKUP AVAILABLE AND PARTY CATERING 201-664-8424 WWW.FARMHOUSECAFENJ.COM TUESDAY-SUNDAY 9AM-8:45PM SCAN ME CALL DIRECT OR ORDER FROM OUR WEBSITE AND SAVE 30% UPCHARGE DELIVERY COMMISSIONS OF UberEats & DoorDash WESTWOOD
  • 12. 12 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS HOLIDAY DINING Classics for Kids on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. Visit the libraryʼs Face- book for the best classic books in kid-friendly versions. • Kailey Levinson presents the second session of her two-part program, Happy, Healthy Kids, live on the libraryʼs Facebook (Park Ridge Public Library-NJ) on Wednesday, Dec. 30, from 4 to 4:30 p.m. Kailey will make awe- some snacks, get the kids moving with Zumba, relax and unwind with mindfulness exercises and more. • Book It Club with Miss Eileen is on Facebook Live Satur- day, Jan. 2 from 10 to 10:30 a.m. Stories, science and more geared towards kids in primary grades. • Join Andrea for her next session of Yoga For Everyone on Facebook Live. All ages and yoga abilities are invited to pull up in front of the screen for some yoga. Find Andrea live on the libraryʼs Facebook page on Monday, Jan. 4 at 6:30 p.m. R RI IV VE ER R V VA AL LE E 412 Rivervale Road (201) 391-2323 rivervalelibrary.org • River Vale Readers Book Club (grades 2–3) will meet on Zoom Tuesday, Jan. 5 from 4 to 4:30 p.m. to discuss “I Survived: The Sinking of the Titanic, 1912” by Lauren Tarshis. Copies avail- able at the front desk or through Libby as an eBook. Registration is required; sign up online. T TO OW WN NS SH HI IP P O OF F W WA AS SH HI IN NG GT TO ON N 144 Woodfield Road (201) 664-4586 twpofwashingtonpl.org • Winter Story Times start Jan. 5 and will be posted on Face- book, YouTube, and the libraryʼs website. Music, reading, puppets and flannel board stories will edu- cate and entertain. Register online to pick up a storytime activity bag. Infants/toddlers meet Fridays at 10 a.m. Preschoolers meet Tuesdays at 10 a.m. LIBRARY CALENDAR: VIRTUAL PROGRAMS THIS WEEK • PJ Story Time is the first Wednesday of the month begin- ning Jan. 6 at 7 p.m. Children of all ages are invited to hear calm- ing bedtime stories and rhymes via Facebook Live. Visit the libraryʼs website to submit your childʼs wish so it can be includ- CONTINUED ON PAGE 19 E EM ME ER RS SO ON N 20 Palisade Ave. (201) 261-5604 emersonlibrary.org • Magical Melodies meets on Monday, Dec. 28, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m., on Facebook Live. High- energy songs, dancing, and instru- ments for ages 2–4. • Baby & Me is on Facebook Tuesday, Dec. 29 at 11:30 a.m. An introduction to songs, dance and finger plays with stuffed animals and rhymes. Newborn to 2. M MO ON NT TV VA AL LE E 12 Mercedes Drive, Suite 100 (201) 391-5090 montvalelibrarynj.org • Dance in the new year at the Montvale Library! There will be a virtual BollyFit Class for adults Tuesday, Jan. 5 from 7 to 7:30 p.m. Register online; Zoom link will be emailed on the day of the event. • Members of the True Crime Book Club are reading “Iʼll Be Gone in the Dark” by Michelle McNamara for their next meeting, Thursday, Jan. 14 from 7 to 8 p.m. The group discusses a new true crime title every month. New mem- bers welcome. Register online. P PA AR RK K R RI ID DG GE E 51 Park Ave. (201) 391-5151 parkridge.bccls.org • Miss Renee Reads the Festival of lights WOODCLIFF LAKE VALLEY CHABAD CTEEN youth group gathered under a tent on Sunday, Dec. 13, for their annu- al teen Chanukah celebration. This year’s event was limited in numbers due to Covid safety, but Chanukah spirit was in full form. The teens held a donut decorating contest and a Chanukah auc- tion. Rabbi Yosef Orenstein, director of the Valley Chabad Teen Leadership Initiative, shared an uplifting holiday message with the teens. Valley Chabad Teen Leadership Initiative offers a vari- ety of social, educational, and community service opportunities to local Jewish teens at no cost. It is open throughout the Pascack Valley and Saddle River communities and no affiliation is neces- sary. For more information, visit valleychabadteens.com or call (201) 476-0157. Photo courtesy Valley Chabad CTeen WE ARE VERY THANKFUL FOR YOUR SUPPORT! Serving the community for over 45 years! Park Ridge, NJ • 201-391-4242 • Fax: 201-782-0396 • www.ridgediner.com “Where friends meet morning, noon or night” Diner • Restaurant The Ridge BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER BAKERY • FREE DELIVERY • TAKEOUT Happy New Year! Order our HOMEMADE cakes, pies and pastries (all baked on premises) for New Year’s! OPEN New Year’s Eve 8am-10pm New Year’s Day 9am-9pm Happy New Year! Voted One Of 201 Magazine’s Best Breakfast Places 7 Consecutive Years! Voted 201 Magazine’s Best Diner 7 Consecutive Years! 20 WASHINGTON AVE., WESTWOOD 201-666-9682 • www.TheIronHorse.com Bring “The Horse” to your New Year’s Eve Party! Place Your Order Today! Place Your Order Today! Bring “The Horse” to your New Year’s Eve Party! PRIVATE PARTY ROOMS AVAILABLE EST. 1972 RESTAURANT CAFE GATHERING PLACE! Wings Wings
  • 13. 13 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS 84 BROADWAY HILLSDALE NJ 201.666.8688 www.thecornerstonenj.com Holiday Gift Cards Available! FAMILY DINNER SPECIALS QUARANTINE PUNCH $8 • LOCKDOWN LEMONADE $8 FREE PIZZA with every order over $50 Nachos $15 Spinach Dip $15 $10 BOTTLES of Pinot Grigio, Cabernet Sauvignon & White Zinfandel MONDAY: Drunken Chicken Parm or Sliders $40 TUESDAY: Boom Boom Tacos $40 Chicken Fajitas $35 • Steak Fajitas $45 WEDNESDAY: Wing Night Specials Turkey Dinner $40 • Chicken Franchise $40 THURSDAY: Pulled Pork $40 Drunken Chicken Parm $40 FRIDAY: Salmon $45 • Cajun Chicken Pasta $40 SATURDAY: Chicken & Ribs $50 Blackened Shrimp Alfredo $40 SUNDAY: Cornerstone Rigatoni $40 Turkey Dinner $40 *Family Dinner Specials and offers cannot be combined with any other offers, coupons or discounts PICK-UP OR DELIVERY 7 DAYS A WEEK! The Cornerstone The Cornerstone The Cornerstone The Cornerstone The Cornerstone The Cornerstone HOLIDAY DINING FROM PAGE 6 release several of its upcoming movies simultaneously on HBO Max and in theaters that are open. After a month, the movies will remain in theaters but will be removed from the streaming serv- ice. The experiment will run for one year. Julia Alexander, writing for The Verge, quotes Warner Bros. CEO Ann Sarnoff saying, “Weʼre living in unprecedented times which call for creative solutions, including this new initiative… No one wants films back on the big screen more than we do. We know new content is the lifeblood of theatrical exhibition, but we have to balance this with the reality that most theaters in the U.S. will likely operate at reduced capacity throughout 2021.” The announcement upset some industry insiders who worry about the long-term effects of such a big decision. Others are cautiously optimistic. With vac- cines now being administered, theater owners and film buffs are hanging onto hope that the moviegoing experience will feel normal again in the near future. Editorʼs note: This feature originally appeared as “Hills stu- dents miss the movie theater expe- rience but are finding ways to fill the void” in the Dec. 18 issue of the Pascack Hills Trailblazer. Youʼll find it and much more at phhstrailblazer.org. We are reprinting it with permission as part of our commitment to ampli- fy student voices from all of our towns in every issue of Pascack Press. Students: Pandemic reshaping movie business Jeffrey Roberts of River Vale one of more than 80 University of Iowa student-athletes to have been named to the 2020 Big Ten Fall Academic All-Conference team. The list includes student-ath- letes from Iowaʼs menʼs cross coun- try, womenʼs cross country, field hockey, football, womenʼs soccer, and volleyball teams. Roberts is a member of Iowaʼs menʼs cross county team and is majoring in marketing. The Big Ten Conference rec- ognized 1,601 fall sports athletes. The list included 124 field hockey players, 582 football players, 139 menʼs and 222 womenʼs cross coun- try runners, 139 menʼs and 260 womenʼs soccer student-athletes and 135 volleyball players. To be eligible for Academic All-Big Ten selection, students must be on a varsity team, as verified by being on the official squad list as of Nov. 1 for fall sports, who have been enrolled full time at the institution for a minimum of 12 months and carry a cumulative grade-point aver- age of 3.0 or higher. JEFFREY ROBERTS NABS ACADEMIC BIG-10 HONORS RIVER VALE Upscale Italian cuisine at affordable prices! Live Music On Weekends WOW!! Fall Special Buy 1, Get 1 FREE Dinner Entree 7 Days MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS FOR NEW YEAR’S EVE DEC 31 50% OFF TAKE OUT DINNERS ONLY 50% OFF FULL CHECK 50% OFF TAKE OUT DINNERS ONLY 50% OFF FULL CHECK
  • 14. 14 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS HOLIDAY DINING HILLSDALE As he suggested he might after the controversial ordinance passed Dec. 8, Mayor John Ruoc- co has vetoed several parts of Ordinance 20-15, adopting the Patterson Street Redevelopment Plan, warning the measure could add 1,100 to 1,700 residents and “unreasonably strain” borough services, wiping out any resultant financial gain. The mayor and council will hold a special public meeting via Zoom on Wednesday, Dec. 30 at 6:30 p.m. to override the veto, in whole or part. (See the borough website for meeting login creden- tials.) In a memo to the borough clerk and forwarded to Pascack Press on the afternoon of Dec. 18, Ruocco said, “I am fully aware of and support the attainment of benefits that adopting a Redevel- opment Plan might bring to the Borough of Hillsdale. Among those is the fulfillment of certain terms of our Affordable Housing Settlement Agreement dated Sept. 27, 2017, executed on Oct. 10, 2017, and subsequently approved by the courts on Feb. 12, 2018.” He said, “That agreement required the Borough to adopt a Redevelopment Plan for the Pat- terson Street industrial area with- in three years of the court approval. The Redevelopment Plan was to permit a variety of uses, including inclusionary housing at a maximum density of 28 units to the acre.” However, he said, Ordinance 20-15—which passed, 5–1, with Ruocco ally Zoltán Horváth in the minority—“permits the coun- cil to award density/height bonuses far in excess of that amount, potentially resulting in 60 units to the acre and buildings of 64 feet in height, and five sto- ries.” Ruocco said, “I veto all parts of the ordinance that permit such bonus densities on the grounds that it would result in overdevel- opment to the community, allowing for approximately 561 apartment units. This potentially translates into an additional 1,100 to 1,700 new residents or about a 10% to 16% increase in the Boroughʼs population.” Predicting an unreasonable strain on services, Ruocco said “I do not believe that it would be in Hillsdaleʼs best interest to agree to such density/height bonuses in future negotiations with potential developers in exchange for ʻcommunity bene- fits.ʼ The latter can be achieved in more straightforward and less harmful ways.” He added, “I believe that permitting such density/height bonuses is imprudent given how it might affect future affordable housing negotiations in 2025, and in view of the fact that neighboring towns have not had to agree to such terms with developers in satisfying their own affordable housing and/or redevelopment efforts.” Ruocco said his veto further reflects “the lack of cost/benefit RUOCCO VETOES REDEVELOPMENT; OVERRIDE VOTE SET FOR DEC. 30 BY JOHN SNYDER OF PASCACK PRESS CONTINUED ON PAGE 16 12 S. Kinderkamack Road•Montvale, NJ (CVS Shopping Ctr.) 201-746-6669 • www.bellissimonj.com Mon-Thurs 11:30-9 • Fri 11:30-10 • Sat 1-10 • Sun 1-9 Like us on *Complimentary Uncorking Service* *On and Off Premise Catering* CALL US TODAY FOR DETAILS WINNER FOUR CONSECUTIVE YEARS 2014-2019 Gift Certificates Available On-line ordering at www.bellissimonj.com OPEN FOR LUNCH MONDAY-FRIDAY: 11:30-3:00 $12-$15 (INCLUDES SOUP AND SALAD WITH ENTREE) THANK YOU FOR THE CONTINUED SUPPORT! WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK CALL FOR RESERVATIONS 201-746-6669 We wish everyone a Healthy and Happy 2021!
  • 15. 15 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS Congratulations to the win- ners of the boroughʼs gingerbread house competition. Each is a world of wonder. • First place: Back to the Future, Figueredo family. • Second place: Joey Tedesco, 2 1 ⁄2 years old. • Third place: WCL Train Station, DeVito family. Elizabeth A. Calderone, director of Communications and Recreation, told Pascack Press on Dec. 22, “We had 20 entries! And they were all super. It wasnʼt easy deciding who was the winner! It was all about bringing some kind of normalcy to the children.” Calderone was eager to share the story of the entry submitted by the Krazit family. A note read: “A number of years ago, I attended a craft fair in Demarest four sides of our home and came back with this house on Christmas Eve. Itʼs a non-edible gingerbread house. We take it out every year. You might recognize it. We are located across the street from Woodcliff Middle School and have lived in town for 17 years!” — Staff report Contest gingerbread houses delight WOODCLIFF LAKE FUTURE BUILDER? Joey Tedesco, 2 1 ⁄2. and I met a woman who made gin- gerbread houses. I kept her busi- ness card and I gave her a call a few weeks before Christmas and asked if she could make me one. “She said that she was work- ing on an really big order from Chuck Schumer for individual gingerbread houses for all mem- bers of Congress! She didnʼt think she could make me one that year. “Well, lo and behold, she called me the week before that Christmas and asked if I still want- ed one. I couldnʼt believe she wanted to make another ginger- bread house. I said sure! “She came to my house and I showed her one that I had cut out of magazine. She said, Oh, Iʼm not going to make that one, I want to make your house! “So, she took pictures of all ON TIME: The DeVito family’s train station. GREAT SCOTT! The Figueredo family built a way out of 2020. LOOKS FAMILIAR: Via the Krazit family. -! ! 0 ! 8 : - 80 . WWW.RELIANCEGOLDBUYER.COM Coins, Flatware DiamondWatches 2 20 01 1- -7 77 73 3- -0 09 99 99 9 WE BUY Rated #1 GOLD SILVER We Do House Calls! at FAIR LAWN 34-10 Broadway Rt. 4 Eastbound • One block from Dunkin Donuts WE BUY ESTATE ITEMS SCRAP GOLD JEWELRY 201-773-0999 201-773-0999 WATCH JEWELRY REPAIR We Beat All Competitors! CASH ON THE SPOT! CASH ON THE SPOT! 3 32 25 5 B BR RO OA AD DW WA AY Y, , W WE ES ST TW WO OO OD D, , N NJ J • • (201)666-0400 • www.jackscafenj.com HOURS: Mon. - Fri. 8AM-9PM • Sat. 9AM-10PM • Sun. 9AM-3PM www.jackscafenj.com Online Ordering Now Available! Online Ordering Now Available! 15% OFF Entire Check CANNOT BE COMBINED. EXPIRES 1/31/21 Happy Holidays to all and to all a Great New Year!!! I LOVE MY POPPY AND GRAMMY!
  • 16. 16 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS FROM PAGE 1 to volunteer at our own risk of becoming infected and it has been a stressful but rewarding time since March,” he said. He added, “The community response with thanks and lawn signs and waves as the ambulance makes its way through the streets has been great. Many of our fund drive donation envelopes included personal notes of thanks. We are humbled by the response.” Desserie Morgan, one of the coordinators of the cheer pro- gram—and a squad mom—said “I am extremely proud of the girlsʼ resiliency during a very challenging time this year. I love the energy they showed; they were real spirit leaders through this. They were super positive and Iʼm very proud of them.” Corps: Cheerleaders bring joy WTVAC MEMBERS left to right: Rich Miras, Chris Hahn, Trevor Landau, Joe Conway, Justin Tsai, Captain Bob Rayve, Bob Ehlers, Eugene Greco, Rob Kopp, Larry Davino, Brian Doherty, and Bob Fox. (Not pictured: Adi Mohan, Linda Husslein, Chris Kracke, David Tarshik, and Gary Peters.) HOURS: M-F 7:30AM-5PM • SAT 8AM-12PM WE WORK WITH ALL INSURANCE COMPANIES Expert Repairs Performed By An Experienced And Professional Team Certified Foreign Domestic Collision Experts OUR WORK IS 100% GUARANTEED. • 24 hour emergency towing with our own trucks • Estimates are always FREE • License #02043A • Frame Straightening • Restoration • Custom Painting • Dent Scratch Removal • Interior Repair www.richsauto.net WOODCLIFF LAKE A final vote on a $45,000 res- olution to update the boroughʼs Master Plan will likely occur at the boroughʼs reorganization meeting, after Mayor Carlos Rendo postponed a vote due to the absence of a council member at the Dec. 21 meeting. Administrator Tom Padilla said the likely date for a Master Plan vote was Jan. 6, 2021 and noted residents will have another chance to provide comment at the Sine Die council session, followed by the reorganization when new- comers Josephine Higgins and Richard Schnoll, both Democrats, will be sworn in. A Dec. 21 public comment session lasted about 10 minutes with two residents requesting the vote to be postponed and one urg- ing its passage. Councilwoman Angela Hayes was absent Dec. 21. Resident and Zoning Board Vice Chair Robin Malley said there were “many misconcep- tions” about what an updated Master Plan would mean and said it will not allow developers to get what they want. “That will be the exact opposite of what will hap- pen.” She said the guidelines in an updated Master Plan will benefit the borough, and that all stake- holders including residents, mayor and council, Planning and Zoning boards, will be able to make sug- gestions for areas around town. She said the borough is more than just the Chestnut Ridge Road and Broadway corridors. She said having an comprehensive Master Plan may help prevent future law- suits from developers due to an outdated plan. “Unfortunately, it canʼt be business as usual… Letʼs try to control our destiny. We need to move forward with updating the Master Plan now,” Malley said. Resident Gwenn Levine asked for a couple months delay in voting on an update to allow more people to become aware of the issue. She said she wanted to advo- cate for retaining single-family homes on the East Side and noted the Broadway sidewalk is a popu- lar walking and jogging place. She noted traffic, the future of 188 Broadwayʼs rejected plan to con- struct a 60-unit, two-building apartment complex (now being appealed), were other concerns. She asked that her concerns be noted prior to any council vote. “This would mean a great deal to me and many other East Side resi- dents,” Levine said. On Dec. 7, the proposed Master Plan update faced criticism over being rushed, plus allegations that the update was being done to appease some potential developer, which offended Rendo, a Republi- can, and especially Council- woman Jacqueline Gadaleta, a Democrat. Rendo broke a 3–3 tie Dec. 7 to introduce the Master Plan update resolution after Democrat- ic councilman Craig Marson and Gadaleta exchanged words about Marsonʼs negative remarks about the need for an update. Voting for the update were Rendo, Democrat Nancy Gross, Republican Steven Falanga and Gadaleta. Opposing the introduc- tion were Marson, and Democrats Angela Hayes and Brian Single- ton. Gross and Singleton, both lame ducks, voted yes and no, respectively. The $45,000 update will be paid for by the borough over five years. Rendo had emphasized that the public will have multiple opportunities for input and com- ment over 6–12 months as a com- prehensive Master Plan review and update is completed. If approved, the update will be done by borough planner Richard Preiss, part of Phillips, Preiss, Grygiel, Lehenny and Hughes LLC. The resolution notes a recent Master Plan reexamination did not address issues related to afford- able housing, Broadway and Chestnut Ridge/Tice Boulevard corridors, redevelopment, large office complexes, nor constitu- tional issues related to religious land use or zoning ordinance changes. It says, “In order to address the land use issues in the borough and encourage certain types of developments in order to main- tain the character of a neighbor- hood, it is necessary to undertake a review of the existing Master Plan and zoning ordinances.” $45K Master Plan update vote moved to Jan. 6 BY MICHAEL OLOHAN OF PASCACK PRESS FROM PAGE 14 analysis included in the Plan or in any accompanying documen- tation that would inform the res- idents on the effects of... overde- velopment.” In his note to Pascack Press, Ruocco said, “Please note that the veto only applies to those portions of the Plan that allude to and/or permit the density/height bonuses.” He notified the clerk of his specific objections in the language of the ordinance. In the wake of the measureʼs second, and final, vote, Ruocco told Pascack Press, “Obviously, Iʼm not pleased,” and said he was considering not signing it. When asked if he had made a decision on a veto, he said, “Decisions of this sort should be made careful- ly and with time.” Also on Dec. 8, Councilman Frank Pizzella, who has for a long time championed redevel- opment in the area, lashed out at Ruocco following the mayorʼs scathing takedown of the ulti- mate plan. Bonus densities are not a foregone conclusion in negotia- tions, Pizzella has said, and the plan ties granting of such bonus- es to the developer providing a community benefit such as a community center, park, open space, or municipal improve- ment. Ruocco said such capital expenses are better financed by a bond issue, where officials may monitor construction. Special redevelopment counsel Joseph Bauman said it would take at least a year before it was likely any developer would come forward and be approved. Moreover, he said, for the plan to transform the area into an aesthetically pleasing and mostly residential mixed-use or congre- gate living zone with uses such as assisted living, it could take up to a decade or more. For more, see staff writer Michael Olohanʼs close report- ing on the issue, including “ʻNot Pleasedʼ vs. ʻGenuinely Happyʼ on Hillsdale Redevelopment Plan,” Dec. 21, 2020. Veto: Special meeting Dec. 30
  • 17. DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS 17 Health, Wellness Fitness Guide Fax: 201-444-5801 • 89 Chestnut Street, Ridgewood, NJ 07450 www.TLCCompanionsNJ.com • Phone: 201-444-5800 Our Caregivers Provide: YHourly or Live-In Companions YPost-Surgery/Rehab Facility Care YFamily Respite for Vacations Functions YSkilled Nursing YPersonal Care There’s No Place Like Home There’s No Place Like Home Wishing You A Safe, Healthy And Happy Holiday Season! SKILLED NURSING IN THE COMFORT OF YOUR OWN HOME. THESAVVYSENIOR:Is Social Security Income Taxable? Dear Savvy Senior, I understand that a portion of my Social Security bene- fits may be tax- able when I retire. Can you tell me how to calculate this? — Ready to Retire Dear Ready, Whether or not youʼll be required to pay federal income tax on your Social Security benefits will depend on your income and filing status. About 35% of Social Security recipients have total incomes high enough to trigger federal income tax on their bene- fits. To figure out if your benefits will be taxable, youʼll need to add up all of your “provisional income,” which includes wages, taxable and non-taxable interest, dividends, pensions and taxable retirement-plan distributions, self- employment, and other taxable income, plus half your annual Social Security benefits, minus certain deductions used in figuring your adjusted gross income. How to Calculate To help you with the calcula- tions, get a copy of IRS Publica- tion 915 “Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits,” which provides detailed instructions and worksheets. You can download it at IRS.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p915.pdf or call the IRS at 800-829-3676 and ask them to mail you a free copy. After you do the calculations, the IRS says that if youʼre single and your total income from all of the listed sources is: • Less than $25,000, your Social Security will not be subject to federal income tax. • Between $25,000 and $34,000, up to 50 percent of your Social Security benefits will be taxed at your regular income-tax rate. • More than $34,000, up to 85% of your benefits will be taxed. If youʼre married and filing jointly and the total from all sources is: • Less than $32,000, your Social Security wonʼt be taxed. • Between $32,000 and $44,000, up to half of your Social Security benefits will be taxed. • More than $44,000, up to 85% of your benefits will be taxed. If youʼre married and file a separate return, you probably will pay taxes on your benefits. To limit potential taxes on your benefits, youʼll need to be cautious when taking distributions from retirement accounts or other sources. In addition to triggering ordi- nary income tax, a distribution that significantly raises your gross income can bump the proportion of your Social Security benefits subject to taxes. How to File If you find that part of your Social Security benefits will be taxable, youʼll need to file using Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR. You also need to know that if you do owe taxes, youʼll need to make quarterly estimated tax payments to the IRS, or you can choose to have it automatically withheld from your benefits. To have it withheld, youʼll need to complete IRS Form W-4V, Voluntary Withholding Request (IRS.gov/pub/irs-pdf/fw4v.pdf), and file it with your local Social Security office. You can choose to have 7%, 10%, 12%, or 22% of your total benefit payment with- held. If you subsequently decide you donʼt want the taxes withheld, you can file another W-4V to stop the withholding. If you have additional ques- tions on taxable Social Security benefits call the IRS help line at (800) 829-1040. State Taxation In addition to the federal gov- ernment, 13 states—Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont and West Virginia—tax Social Securi- ty benefits to some extent too. If you live in one of these states, check with your state tax agency for details. For links to state tax agencies see TaxAdmin.org/state- tax-agencies. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of “The Savvy Senior” book. BY JIM MILLER Established 1962 We handle all insurance claims. ALL REPAIRS FULLY GUARANTEED • Certified Collision Specialist • Complete Frame Unibody Repair • Expert Refinishing • Towing Available FREE ESTIMATES 36 Orchard St. Hillsdale, NJ 07642 LIC # 03801A PASCACK AUTO BODY 201-664-2276 Club News? Let us help promote your club or organization. Send all news to pascackpress@thepressgroup.net or mail to: Pascack Press, P.O. Box 335, Westwood, NJ 07675
  • 18. TO PLACE YOUR AD Call 201.664.2105 fax 201.664.2109 or e-mail us at pascackpress@thepressgroup.net Give your business the attention it deserves! 18 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS Health, Wellness Fitness Guide Many people are confused about c o r o n a v i r u s because there is a lot of informa- tion coming from different sources and it is hard to decipher whose recom- mendations are best. First of all, listen to the advice of your doctor or healthcare provider over the opinions of the news or the guide- lines of the government. Your health care provider is more like- ly to give you the best feedback you need to make informed deci- sions. Another reason we are get- ting so many conflicting reports regarding Covid-19 is because it is a new virus, and it will take years before we really understand how this virus works and how it originated. Therefore, I am going to tell you about this coronavirus, but also review how to avoid get- ting sick from any other type of virus, as well. First of all, the rea- son this virus is called Covid-19 is because it is a coronavirus that was discovered in 2019. However, there are many coronaviruses and probably thousands of other viruses that have lived in our bod- ies for years without you even knowing about it because your immune system keeps them in check and the news does not report about it every day. In fact, you have already been exposed to coronavirus before if you ever had a common cold. Anyone of these coron- aviruses, including Covid-19, becomes a problem when the immune system is weak, thus allowing viruses to take advan- tage and cause bodily harm. Unfortunately right now, everyone is looking how to avoid the virus by figuring out ways to prevent it from entering your body, such as social distancing, wearing a mask and gloves, and staying at home. My contention with this line of thinking is that you cannot hide from viruses because they are in your body right now. You have to have a strong immune system and be healthy so that when you do encounter a new virus, you can fight it off without the help of medications, antibac- terial soaps, or lotions. If you are using a lot of antibacterial prod- ucts, you will end up killing good microbes such as bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, that act as a defense system to keep out the bad stuff, absorb nutrients, and maintain a strong immune system. It is better to get some expo- sure to bacteria and viruses so you can make your immune stronger rather than trying to avoid any type of exposure. If you try to hide from viruses and avoid bac- teria, you will weaken your immune system due to lack of use, as well as create resistant superbugs and superviruses that medication cannot treat. I do agree you can help reduce transmission of this virus by washing your hands with soap and water, as well as avoid touch- ing your face, but we have to relax with all of the lysols, bleaches and products that have known toxins in the ingredients. Because it is impossible to hide from viruses and bacteria, you cannot quarantine yourself now and expect that in a few weeks the coronavirus will no longer be here. If you have not already been exposed to Covid-19, you soon will be as the country is starting to open up now. It is imperative that if you have a fever and are feeling sick and are coughing and sneez- ing, stay at home to protect the rest of us. However if you are healthy, instead of staying inside your home living in fear, I advise you to make your body strong and improve your health, so that when you do get exposed, your immune system can handle it and fight it off appropriately. We do not need to live in fear. If you are in fear, you will increase cortisol, which is the stress hormone. As a result of the increase in stress, your immune system will become suppressed and viruses are able to thrive and cause more harm to your body. In addition, if you just stay inside your house hiding from the virus, that means you are not going outside, breathing oxygen, and exposing your skin to the sun- light. Four of the best defenses against coronavirus are the sun- light, vitamin D, air, and oxygen. Unfortunately, most people are deficient in vitamin D. If you have current blood work, take a look at it right now. When analyz- ing blood work, it is important to look at the different ranges or scales. In addition, most Americans have adopted a very unhealthy lifestyle that consists of a poor diet, sedentary lifestyle, poor sleep, lack of water, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and high stress levels. Therefore, when you receive blood work, they are comparing you to a bunch of sick Americans, most of whom have heart disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and lung disease. So when the blood work comes back and they tell you everything is normal, they are really telling you that you are like a typical unhealthy American. When looking at blood work, it is recommended to use the function- al medicine scale instead of what most labs use as the normal scale. For example, in reference to vitamin D, most laboratories will state that any levels above 25 to 30 ng/mL are normal. However according to many functional medicine doctors, a healthy level would be around 60 ng/mL. If your vitamin D levels are high, your immune system will func- tion better and you have a better chance of not getting sick from coronavirus or other viruses. Call my office if you would like a FREE bottle of vitamin D as a Christmas present from us to you! Another way people are try- ing to hide from the virus besides staying inside their homes, is wearing surgical masks. When doctors and nurses wear masks and PPE in hospitals, it protects the patient who is getting the sur- gery done by keeping the environ- ment sterile. The masks will not prevent you from getting coron- avirus, in fact, it might make things worse because it gives you a false sense of security. People who wear the masks end up touching their face a lot more which can also be risky. Some studies have shown coronavirus can live on a mask for eight days. Doctors are recommended to change masks every 90 minutes in sterile environments so we need to clean our masks more frequent- ly to prevent transmission. In addition, if you are wear- ing a mask, it may result in you breathing in less oxygen and more carbon dioxide. Conse- quently, this will create a more acidic environment and viruses thrive in acidic environments. If you already have a problem like asthma, COPD, bronchitis, nau- sea or dizziness, wearing a mask may aggravate your condition so consult with your medical doctor and see if it is appropriate for you. In my opinion, it is better to go outside in nature, get some fresh air and sunlight, take off your mask, breath in oxygen, and exhale carbon dioxide. In addi- tion, it is best to exhale twice as long as you inhale to maximize oxygen intake and reduce carbon dioxide levels to prevent dysfunc- tion. I also want to stress again how important it is to drink water. Drink half your body weight in ounces and take at least a sip of water every 20 minutes. If you drink water every 20 minutes, perform breathing exercises, get vitamin D by going out in the sunlight for 20 minutes between noon and 2 p.m., stop watching the news, go to bed early, medi- tate, be in nature, reduce stress, get off social media, keep social distances, wash your hands with soap and water, and do not touch your face, you will decrease your chances immensely. If you follow what the news and the government is telling you, you will stay inside, live in fear, and not get sunlight and oxygen, which will suppress your immune system. If you fol- low what the news and the gov- ernment is telling you, you can go to the mall to buy Christmas presents, but you cannot give those presents in person to your family because that is considered too dangerous. They want you to stay at home and not see your friends and family. You will be isolated from your community creating depression and anxiety which will make you more susceptible to Covid-19. If you watch the news, you will become stressed and anxious which will weaken your immune system making you more prone to coronavirus. However, if you keep it sim- ple, and focus on getting fresh air, sunlight, good nutrition, exercise, and water, you will be less stressed, have a stronger immune system, and be more likely to defeat any virus you encounter so that you can feel better, function better, and live better. If you are interested in learning natural ways to build your immune system and living a life without fear, stress, and anx- iety please call me at (201) 261- 2150 or email me at info@kaplanbrainandbody.com and you can register for my free Zoom lecture on Jan. 5, 2021 at 6:30 p.m. and I would be happy to help you without drugs, med- ications, or surgeries. Call today because spots are filling up quickly. Editorʼs note: We have not fact- checked the assertions made in this paid advertiser content. The writer is not an expert in infectious disease or public health. Publication is not an endorsement. Check with your primary care physician on health concerns, including depression and COVID-19. DR. KAPLAN: ‘My views on Covid-19 and keeping healthy’ DR. ERIC KAPLAN, KAPLAN BRAIN BODY ADVERTISER CONTENT
  • 19. DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS 19 Health, Wellness Fitness Guide The Borough of Park Ridge is establishing a Diversity Committee to advise the administration. Vol- unteers willing to meet regularly and make recommendations related to diversity and inclusion in Park Ridge are welcome. Anyone interested should send their contact information to jfalkenstern@parkridgeboro.com. Diversity Committee seeks members PARK RIDGE CALL TODAY! 201-664-4022 Call JVS Landscaping For... Call JVS Landscaping For... Call JVS Landscaping For... Call JVS Landscaping For... Call JVS Landscaping For... Call JVS Landscaping For... SNOW PLOWING SNOW PLOWING SNOW PLOWING SNOW PLOWING SNOW PLOWING As of Dec. 22 there were 60 COVID-19 cases in town with 12 new positives added in the previ- ous two days. None were hospital- ized and many show no symptoms. Said Mayor Michael Ghassali, “This means that 60 of our neigh- bors in town currently carry the virus and should be quarantining. There are however a few residents testing positive and are part of the active cases and are not quarantin- ing as instructed, they are putting their family and the community at risk. Please help us by doing your part and quarantine as instructed.” He added, “I also received many questions about the vaccina- tion process and the timeline. There is a plan, but that's all it is for now, just a plan and as soon as we get more information, will share it immediately.” Ghassali on COVID cases, vaccine plan MONTVALE FROM PAGE 12 ed in “Star Light, Star Bright.” W WE ES ST TW WO OO OD D 49 Park Ave. (201) 664-0583 westwoodpubliclibrary.org • Holiday Themed Snacks (grades K–2) is on WebEx Wed- nesday, Dec. 30 from 1 to 1:45 p.m. Miss Jaclyn, a registered dietician, will show kids how to make two easy and healthy snacks. Register and find ingredient list online. • Music Play Patrol (toddlers to age 5) is on Zoom Tuesday, Jan. 5 from 10:30 to 11 a.m. This weekly musical program gets kids dancing and learning about music, rhythm and instruments. Register online. • Intro to Scratch Coding on Zoom (grades 1–3) begins Tues- day, Jan. 5 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Meets weekly in January and February. Scratch is a visual pro- gramming language whose drag- and-drop interface with colorful blocks makes it an intuitive pro- gramming language for young learners. Register online. • Early Reader Book Club: Geronimo Stilton (grades 3–4) is on Google Meet Wednesday, Jan. 6 from 4 to 4:45 p.m. Read a dif- ferent book each month in this fun, interactive mouse series. For story each week and build the story in the order of events. This fosters comprehension and critical thinking skills. Pick up activity Library Calendar January 2021: “Geronimo on Ice.” Books available at the library cir- culation desk. Kids should read the book prior to the meeting. Registration details on the libraryʼs website. • Java Coding on Zoom (grades 4–5) launches Thursday, Jan. 7 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Every Thursday in January and February, beginner and intermedi- ate users will be challenged in this popular programming language. Java is used in many gaming and app development opportunities such as Minecraft. Register online. • Nursery Rhyme Story Sequence (Pre-K, 3–5 years old) is on Google Meet every Friday in January, starting Jan. 8 from 10:30 to 11 a.m. Children listen to a new pack from the library to partici- pate in all four sessions. Have a sheet of paper, scissors, and glue stick ready for each week. The Friends of the Westwood Public Library and Celebrate Westwood have teamed up to bring you a way to recognize some of your favorite places in town, while also sup- porting the community. They are now selling com- memorative jigsaw puzzles— each one 100 pieces, approxi- mately 9-by-12 inches—perfect for any Westwood lover. There are five local scenes to choose from: PJ Finneganʼs, The Iron Horse, Westwood Cycle, the Westwood Library, and the bandstand in Veterans Park. They go for $20 each, or, for a limited time, all five for $75. All proceeds from this fundraiser go to the Friends of the Library and Celebrate West- wood, who in turn support local businesses, restaurants and resi- dents in this difficult time. Visit the libraryʼs website, westwoodpubliclibrary.org, to see the puzzles and for informa- tion about purchasing. Jigsaw puzzles capture scenes in Westwood L. SCOTT BERKOBEN, P.A. A Professional Corporation Attorneys at Law Experienced Municipal Prosecutors and Defenders Criminal Charges Do Not MakeACriminal We have seen criminal cases from both sides...having served as prosecutors and also as defenders in the courts for many years. If you face charges, we can probably help you. 211 Center Ave., Westwood • (201)666-7770 Visit our website: www.lscottberkoben.com
  • 20. 20 DECEMBER 28, 2020 • PASCACK VALLEY PRESS Club News? Let us help promote your club or organization. Send all news to pascackpress@thepressgroup.net or mail to: Pascack Press, P.O. Box 335, Westwood, NJ 07675 increase. While it does make sense to wait as long as you can, Rob Arthur, first vice president/man- ager of the Federal Benefits Con- sulting Group, Wells Fargo Advi- sors, recommends you reevaluate your situation every year in retire- ment before deciding whether to continue delaying getting bene- fits. One item you need for that annual retirement review: a cur- rent copy of your Social Security benefit estimate from ssa.gov. This provides personalized esti- mates of future benefits based on your real earnings and lets you see your latest statement and your earnings history. Here, Arthur outlines a com- parison of claiming now vs. later, and offers key considerations as you review your strategy each year. Comparison: Claiming soon- er vs. later. Letʼs start with a hypothetical example: John Doe was born in 1960 and was earning $200,000 a year when he retired. He decided to start receiving Social Security benefits as soon as he became eligible at 62, or five years before he would receive CLAIM BENEFITS SOONER OR LATER? full retirement benefits. His monthly benefit in todayʼs dollars is $2,106. If he had delayed receiving benefits until he was 70, heʼd receive $1,700 more a month, or $3,806. And he would make up for the eight-year delay in not tak- ing any benefits in about 10 years. (And because one out of every four 65-year-olds today will live past age 90, according to the Social Security Administration1, the long-term benefit could be substantial.) Make wellness a deciding factor. Your health can play a big role in helping determine when you should start taking benefits. Do your loved ones live long lives, or has everyone succumbed to illness before age 65? “Itʼs not the most accurate indicator of whatʼs going to tran- spire in the future, but it can have some bearing,” Arthur says. “If youʼre in reasonably good health, that counsels in favor of waiting,” he continues. “If youʼre in poor or guarded health, that counsels toward drawing benefits sooner rather than later.” Do you have enough income? Another key factor is having other sources of income to live comfort- ably in retirement without need- ing Social Security benefits. He says you should consider the guaranteed rate of return Social Security offers: 6.25% (plus a cost-of-living increase). Thatʼs better than the guaranteed rate of return available in todayʼs market. Considerations for married couples. Arthur advises married clients look at multiple factors when determining the timing for each spouse to claim Social Secu- rity benefits. For example, if your spouse works full time and you work part time or seasonally, his or her Social Security benefits may be dramatically higher than yours. Itʼs still wise for both of you to wait, if possible. “Not only does it increase the size of the benefit that the [higher- earning] individual personally receives, but it also increases the size of whatʼs known as the sur- vivorʼs benefit that the [lower- earning] spouse could draw if the individual passes away,” Arthur says. Keep in mind that the cur- rent average life expectancy of a 65-year-old man is 84 years, while a woman that age can expect to live until age 86, according to the Social Security Administration. What about taxes? When it comes to when to claim Social Security benefits, Arthur advises his clients not to focus primarily on the tax ramifications. “The vast majority of peo- ple that I counsel, their marginal tax rate in retirement will be fairly constant,” Arthur says. “If retirees were to take their Social Security benefit at 62, what I typically see is their marginal tax rate is exactly the same or approximately the same as it would be if they claimed the benefit at age 70. I want [them] to focus instead on maximizing the net cash flow over the remainder of their lifetime.” Global Investment Strategy is a division of Wells Fargo Invest- ment Institute, Inc. (“WFII”). WFII is a registered investment adviser and wholly-owned sub- sidiary of Wells Fargo Company and provides investment advice to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Wells Fargo Advisors and other Wells Fargo affiliates. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. is a bank affiliate of Wells Fargo Company. This article was written by/for Wells Fargo Advisors and provided courtesy of Eric Kohlmeier, senior financial advisor, managing direc- tor—investments in Park Ridge, (201) 505-0472. Investments in securities and insurance products are not FDIC- insured/not bank-guranteed/may lost value. Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, Member SIPC, is a registered bro- ker-dealer and a separate non- bank affiliate of Wells Fargo Company. Editorʼs note: The following article is for informational purposes only. When it comes to Social Securi- ty and retire- ment, you may have conflicting viewpoints: On one side, you hope to start collecting your ben- efits as soon as youʼre eligible— after all, itʼs your hard-earned money. On the other side, you know that, if you wait, your monthly benefit amount will ERIC KOHLMEIER SELL NOW! Gold is $1,890oz.! WE BUY YOUR OLD NEW: Platinum/Gold Jewelry 10K * 14K * 18K * 22K * 24K Rings, Bracelets, Earrings Diamonds * Watches * All Sterling Silver * Dental Gold * Broken Jewelry OK Silver Dimes $1.60 * Quarters $4.00 Half $8.00 * Dollars $20.00 ea. ORADELL COIN 340 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell, NJ 201-265-5310 • Open Mon thru Sat 9am to 12 Noon 40 yrs. at this location State Certified Scales 25% Bonus With This Ad* *Except silver coins • Coupon Must be Presented at Start of Transaction.