Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Using 3D pedestrian microsimulation to demonstrate good design

238 views

Published on

Ravi Kaberwal

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Using 3D pedestrian microsimulation to demonstrate good design

  1. 1. Ravi Kaberwal Graduate Transport Engineer Using 3D Pedestrian Microsimulation to Demonstrate Good Design Principles July 2016
  2. 2.  Design models have been used for many years by designers and engineers as a tool to understand the practical implications of using a design, including its:  strengths  weaknesses  opportunities for improvement  From a pedestrian analysis perspective, depending on the scale of the project, we use both static and dynamic models extensively. 2 MODELS IN DESIGN
  3. 3. 3 Static models (both visual and mathematical) can be used to guide minimum requirements. Whether it be determining how wide a footpath needs to be, or the number of escalators required. PEDESTRIAN PERSPECTIVE
  4. 4. PEDESTRIAN PERSPECTIVE 4 2D dynamic models, in addition to informing design requirements can be used to identify:  conflict zones  bottlenecks  other design issues which would otherwise may not have been identified.
  5. 5. 3D simulation provides an opportunity to immerse ourselves and others within our designs. 5 PEDESTRIAN PERSPECTIVE
  6. 6. 6 On projects, particularly large scale infrastructure projects, you engage with a wide variety of:  peers from other disciplines  clients  stakeholders Each with numerous (and sometimes differing) perspectives and opinions. 3D animations can be used as a communication tool to visually explain why certain design element is appropriate, or simply doesn’t work. APPLICATION ON PROJECTS
  7. 7. 7  For any design there have always been those elementary principles, which we as specialists tend to adopt on the understanding that they represent “good design”.  When a design is reviewed, unique or “different”, design solutions are ironically quite often easier to explain as we would have a reason to diverge from what we understand to be “good design”. What happens when a client, stakeholder or a peer questions these “good design” principles? How can we explain why we used one design over another? APPLICATION ON PROJECTS
  8. 8. 8 Simple examples of “good design” include:  Line of sight  Walking distance and proximity  Walkway profiles  Conflict zones APPLICATION ON PROJECTS
  9. 9. BASE MODEL 9 EastWest Gateline Walkways
  10. 10. Good Design Principles LINE OF SIGHT
  11. 11. LINE OF SIGHT 11
  12. 12. LINE OF SIGHT 12
  13. 13. LINE OF SIGHT 13
  14. 14. LINE OF SIGHT 14
  15. 15. LINE OF SIGHT 15
  16. 16. Good Design Principles PROXIMITY
  17. 17. PROXIMITY 17
  18. 18. PROXIMITY 18
  19. 19. PROXIMITY 19
  20. 20. PROXIMITY 20 Door location of 5th carriage of 8 car train
  21. 21. PROXIMITY 21
  22. 22. PROXIMITY 22
  23. 23. PROXIMITY 23
  24. 24. Good Design Principles WALKWAYS
  25. 25. WALKWAYS 25
  26. 26. WALKWAYS 26
  27. 27. WALKWAYS 27 Option 1: Straight Walkway Option 2: Curved Walkway
  28. 28. WALKWAYS 28 Option 1: Straight Walkway
  29. 29. WALKWAYS 29 Option 2: Curved Walkway
  30. 30. Good Design Principles CONFLICT ZONES
  31. 31. CONFLICT ZONES 31 Option 1: Cross junction Option 2: Staggered junction
  32. 32. CONFLICT ZONES 32 Option 1: Cross junction
  33. 33. CONFLICT ZONES 33 Option 2: Staggered junction
  34. 34. 34 For these 4 simple concepts I’ve showed you their strengths and weaknesses in around 10 minutes. How much quicker and easier could it make walking through even more difficult concepts with  Peers from other disciplines  Clients  Stakeholders? 3D pedestrian animations aren’t just limited to the this example, but can be applied to any environment or project to immerse people within your design. CONCLUSION
  35. 35. Questions? Thank You

×