Portraits
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tips for Great Portraits <ul><li>Making people feel at ease is paramount. Photographing your subject in his own territory ...
<ul><li>If you're photographing kids and want to use a prop, give some thought to what the prop will be. An old-fashioned ...
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Portraits

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Examples of portraits and tips for taking great portraits for digital photography class.

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Portraits

  1. 1. Portraits
  2. 37. Tips for Great Portraits <ul><li>Making people feel at ease is paramount. Photographing your subject in his own territory helps, as does using natural settings such as beaches, lakes, forests, old barns, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Take your work outside. Natural light is more pleasing than harsh flashes. </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of lighting. Late afternoon is the best time to shoot, because the light is warm and produces nice textures. Morning works, too. Avoid noon lighting, however. It’s much too harsh--unless, of course, you’re going for harsh! Overcast days are also good, since they produce even lighting. Don’t be put off by bad weather. You may get a great portrait in the pouring rain. </li></ul>
  3. 38. <ul><li>If you're photographing kids and want to use a prop, give some thought to what the prop will be. An old-fashioned teddy bear or antique toy are more pleasing visual companions than a plastic or trendy toy. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the eyes only. Let the ears and some of the hair remain out of focus. </li></ul><ul><li>Experiment with different angles and avoid the straight-on viewpoint. </li></ul><ul><li>Get in close. Many beginning portrait photographers stand too far away. Your subject should take up at least seventy-five percent of the frame. </li></ul><ul><li>The back of someone qualifies as a portrait. </li></ul><ul><li>Have a conversation with your model first. Click away while you're talking. Ask a child about a tough homework assignment or something that’s bothering him, and you’ll get a very different portrait than if you discuss the fun time he had at a birthday party. </li></ul>

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