Patient Compliance Report 2013

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How do patients learn and seek healthcare information? What influence does technology have on patient healthcare communication? Our Patient Healthcare Communications report explores the answers to these questions and more.

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business

Patient Compliance Report 2013

  1. 1. Star Life Sciences Medical Monitor™ 2013 Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc.
  2. 2. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 2 Star Life Sciences partnered with Plesser & Clifford, a 30-year-old market research company specializing in medical marketing research, in designing and implementing this study.
  3. 3. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 3 • Background, Objectives and Research Methodology • Executive Summary/Implications • Detailed Findings • Compliance - Factors that motivate people to take their medications (open-ended) - Brainstorming ideas that may improve compliance (open-ended) - Rating usefulness of ideas that could help respondent take medicine (close-ended) - Ranking “most useful” ideas • Sources of Health Information - Usage of social media to discuss health issues - Healthcare plan contact - Sources of information • Reaction to Passage of Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • Respondent Characteristics • Appendix: Screener and Questionnaire Contents
  4. 4. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 4 Background, Objectives & Research Methodology
  5. 5. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 5 • Star Life Sciences wishes to build its learning base of what motivates patients to be in compliance with their medication regimen and stay current on where patients get their information regarding their healthcare. • This study is very similar to the Star Life Sciences Medical Monitor™ study conducted in 2007. Where possible, comparisons will be made to that study. Background Background | Objectives | Research Methodology
  6. 6. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 6 The objectives of this study are: • To learn among patients with specific disease states: - What motivates them to be compliant - What they would like that they do not have now to help with compliance - Reaction to compliance idea concept statements • To learn among patients of different ages: - Where they get their information regarding their health and the role the computer, smart phone and social media play -Their initial feelings regarding the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Objectives Background | Objectives | Research Methodology
  7. 7. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 7 • Online interview • 5-7 minutes in length • Respondents were 100 patients taking regular medication for arthritis, hypertension, diabetes, asthma, depression, or cholesterol • All interviews were conducted by the Reinvention Panel between January 17 and January 18, 2013 Research Methodology Background | Objectives | Research Methodology
  8. 8. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 8 Executive Summary
  9. 9. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 9 The strongest motivating factors for taking prescription medication are personal: • Symptom relief • Worry about disease state getting worse • Feel better for self Compliance Motivation Executive Summary
  10. 10. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 10 Ideas to increase compliance are thought to have more of an impact if they “find them where they live.” For younger people, this is their smart phone, for older people this is via email. When asked for suggestions on ways to increase compliance, respondents focused on: 1. Pillboxes (current use and improved aesthetics and functionality) 2. Smart phone – apps, text reminders, alarms (younger respondents) 3. Email This is a significant change from the 2007 Star Life Sciences Medical MonitorTM Report when suggestions focused on free-standing alarms, alarms on pillboxes, better-designed pillboxes, and email. In this year’s study, while almost half of all comments from the 36-55 year old group involved mobile phones, no one over the age of 56 in this study mentioned using a mobile phone in any way to help them remember their medicine.Those in the older segments were more reliant on computer reminders such as emails. While apps were considered a good idea, nobody in this study mentioned currently using an app to help them remember to take their medicine. Compliance Brainstorm Ideas Executive Summary
  11. 11. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 11 On a closed-end rating, the ideas rated most useful to help patients take their prescription medicine were: • Discount coupons • Educational material • Reminder text, email and calls from pharmacy The preference of reminder ideas varied widely across age segments: • 18-35 year olds prefer technology involving their smart phone including apps, reminder texts and actual calls • 36-54 year olds closely resemble their younger counterparts and also prefer notification via smart phone • 55-64 year old segment are more computer- than phone-driven and feel reminders via the computer (emails, online diaries) would be most useful • Over 65 year olds also like emails, but also read written materials and would appreciate phone calls Compliance Rating/Ranking Ideas Executive Summary
  12. 12. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 12 While the motivation for taking prescription medicine is personal, there is an opportunity to create a communication relationship with the patient via reminders for usage compliance.The best way to do this is to “meet them where they live.” For young people this is increasingly on their smart phones, for older people, this is on the computer. Compliance Implications Executive Summary
  13. 13. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 13 In addition to personal interaction with physicians, pharmacists, and friends/family, online resources have increasingly joined the stream of information regarding healthcare available to patients. In this study we also found that people are just as likely to use an online resource as their personal medical connections to get advice on their healthcare. Most of their online usage is a general search, but specific sites such as WebMD are frequently mentioned. Social media (e.g., Facebook) is also used (34%) to discuss illnesses/medications, but it isn’t a primary source of information. Sources of Health Information Executive Summary
  14. 14. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 14 Respondents overall were just as likely to talk to their healthcare professionals as to go online regarding their healthcare issues. However, this varies greatly by age.Those under 36 were twice as likely to address their problems via the internet rather than their personal providers; those 36-54 also used the internet slightly more.Those over 55 also used the internet frequently but sought out their healthcare professionals more. Sources of Health Information Executive Summary
  15. 15. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 15 Historically, people have always tried to answer their health questions at home (with friends and family), or with their physicians. Many, especially younger people, have now added the internet to their personal health toolbox.This opens the door of opportunity for companies—that in the past would not have had access to patients in their physician’s office—to “meet” them online and perhaps influence their healthcare opinions. Information Source Implications Executive Summary
  16. 16. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 16 Respondents were also asked how they felt about the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Opinions were mixed with 35% happy it passed, 41% having no opinion yet, and 24% not happy it passed.There seems to be a lot of uncertainty as to what this new law will do to respondents’ healthcare plans and bank accounts. Star Life Sciences and its clients may be able to help bridge that knowledge gap. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Executive Summary
  17. 17. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 17 Detailed Findings Compliance Factors that Motivate People toTakeTheir Medications
  18. 18. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 18 There were four major motivations for patients to take their medicines: 1. Symptom relief—make the pain go away—38% of open-ended responses 2. Worry about getting worse—avoid the consequences—37% of responses 3. Feel better for self—enjoy life—15% of responses 4. Physician/authority figures—8% of responses Motivating Factors Compliance: Motivating Factors
  19. 19. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 19 • 38% of open-ended reasons • Deals with specific physical symptoms: - Not emotional - Related to physical need to stop the pain (arthritis) or correct a symptom(breathing difficulty) • A sub-theme is product efficacy • Spans all disease states, but most frequently mentioned for: - Arthritis - Asthma - Depression (approximately half the depression patients) MakeThe Pain Go Away: Symptom Relief Compliance: Motivating Factors
  20. 20. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 20 • “Pain is the biggest motivator. When I take my medications, I can function” (Arthritis) • “Pain is the prime motivator. Since I also have peripheral neuropathy, the tramadol and a methadone treatment are all I have to control pain that varies between a 5 and a 7 on a 10-point scale even with the dual treatments” (Arthritis) • “For ease of joint pain” (Arthritis) • “If it makes me feel better seeing results that I am supposed to see when taking meds, improves my body function” (Arthritis) • “Asthma/breathing difficulty, which becomes more severe during the spring and summer months or during excessive physical activity” (Asthma) • “To be able to breathe” (Asthma) • “So I don’t have asthma attacks, so my chest isn’t tight, so I can breathe freely, so I can exercise and do physical activities” (Asthma) • “So I can breathe, so I don’t have rapid heart beats” (Asthma) Manage Symptoms: Pain Relief Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors
  21. 21. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 21 • “So I won’t be depressed or moody” (Depression) • “I have many meds. I have Fibromyalgia, COPD HepC cfd, IBS, I am on fentanyl patches 100 every 48 hours instead of 72 hours. Just so I can move from pain which depresses me. I have to take my meds so I can get up and try and have a somewhat normal life” (Depression) • “It works effectively” (Depression) • “Alleviate pain; avoid withdrawals; lessen depression symptoms” (Depression) • “Meds control medical conditions” (Diabetes) • “Keep blood sugar in control” (Diabetes) • “Lowers blood pressure, helps my sugar and cholesterol” (Diabetes) • “Lower cholesterol” (Cholesterol) • “Keeps my high blood pressure under control. Stay alive” (Hypertension) • “To keep my blood pressure regulated. For my heart health” (Hypertension) • “To lower blood pressure and reduce headaches” (Cholesterol) Manage Symptoms: Pain Relief Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors
  22. 22. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 22 • 37% of open-ended reasons • This group of reasons is emotional; driven in large part by fear of getting worse • Words that describe the motivations of these respondents include: - Avoid - Control - Worry - Prevention • Respondents with diabetes, hypertension and approximately half of cholesterol and depression patients were the most likely to be in this group Control/Avoid Consequences Compliance: Motivating Factors
  23. 23. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 23 • “To maintain my health, reduce risks of further diseases” (Arthritis) • “It helps control my condition and helps me breathe better” (Asthma) • “It helps control my mood” (Depression) • “It keeps me out of depression” (Depression) • “Keeps me from having panic attacks” (Depression) • “I take my depression meds so I feel good. I don’t sleep all the time. I have happy thoughts. I am not depressed. And I enjoy things in life” (Depression) • “Do not want to get sicker” (Diabetes) • “Control condition and prevent further complications” (Diabetes) • “Fear of health problems in the future, my family, trying to feel my best” (Diabetes) Control/Avoid Consequences: Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors
  24. 24. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 24 • “Stay healthy, control issues and regulate problems, help control the problems until I can get them under control without medicine” (Diabetes) • “Keep blood sugar in control; help my spouse so she doesn’t have to worry; make life easier with good health” (Diabetes) • “I need to for my health, or it would be serious repercussions” (Cholesterol) • “Do not want to get sicker” (Cholesterol) • “I take them so I can feel better and stay alive” (Cholesterol) • “PREVENT HEART ATTACK, STROKE” (Cholesterol) • “Prevent me from future problems with heart as far as stroke or heart attack” (Cholesterol) • “Helps me feel myself and keeps me from other symptoms” (Hypertension) • “My blood pressure is high and I’m at risk for a heart attack or stroke. My doctor put me on medicine to minimize that risk” (Hypertension) Control/Avoid Consequences: Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors
  25. 25. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 25 • 15% of open-ended reasons • Respondents in this group believe that taking medication enhances their quality of life: - On a daily basis - May extend life span • More about emotions than physical symptoms • Some from each group—but approximately half the cholesterol patients—felt this was why they took their medicine Feel Better for Self/Quality of Life Compliance: Motivating Factors
  26. 26. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 26 • “Prolong life, feel better each day, doctor’s orders, common sense” (Arthritis) • “So I can be able to live each day and keep myself healthy and not get sick” (Asthma) • “I have happy thoughts, I am not depressed and I enjoy things in life” (Asthma) • “So I can be able to live each day and keep myself healthy” (Depression) • “To feel better and be more productive.To ensure that I am around for my wife and children as long as possible” (Depression) • “Feel better, live longer “ (Diabetes) • “Help my spouse so she doesn’t have to worry; make life easier with good health” (Diabetes) Quality of Life: Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors
  27. 27. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 27 Quality of Life: Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors • “Be healthier, feel better, live longer” (Cholesterol) • “Better Life” (Cholesterol) • “To be healthy and live a productive life” (Cholesterol) • “To maintain healthy levels for maintaining health and longevity” (Cholesterol) • “I want to remain healthy. Better life” (Hypertension) • “To feel better and be more productive.To ensure that I am around for my wife and children as long as possible” (Depression)
  28. 28. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 28 Physician Recommended: Sample Verbatims Compliance: Motivating Factors • 8% of reasons to take their medications • These people put their faith in their physician.They believe that the physician is the expert and knows better • “My doctor says I need it” (Depression) • “My doctor’s prescription” (Asthma) • “Doctor recommendation to control condition, prevent further complications” (Diabetes) • “Doctor’s orders. Don’t want to die!” (Cholesterol) • “Doctor said to” (Hypertension)
  29. 29. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 29 Detailed Findings Compliance Aid to Remembering to Take Medicine Brainstorming Ideas
  30. 30. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 30 Brainstorming Ideas Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • Respondents were asked to answer the question, “When thinking about what you do to make sure you take your medicine as prescribed, is there anything whatsoever that you would like that would help you to take your medicine as prescribed?” • There were 94 ideas reported, as follows:
  31. 31. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 31 “Top Mentions” Brainstorming Ideas Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas There were no differences across disease types. (There were some differences among age groups, and these will be noted.) Pillboxes (34% of all comments) • Approximately one third of the comments mentioned pillboxes. For many, this is what they currently use and they are satisfied with their functionality. A few of the comments mentioned ideas for improvement. Nothing (23% of all comments) • Approximately 25% of these respondents believed they already had a successful system. • Some also felt that their physical symptoms were adequate reminders, especially Asthma sufferers.
  32. 32. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 32 Ideas Utilizing Smart Phone or Computer Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas 35% of all suggestions had to do with using the computer and/or smart phone as a reminder to take medicine in 2013.This is a significant increase from 2007. Additionally, where there were many suggestions for alarms in 2007 (13%), but they were on the pillbox, clock or stand-alone devices.The mentions of alarms in 2013 were tied into alarms on cell phones.
  33. 33. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 33 Ideas Utilizing Smart Phone (19% of all comments) Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas This group of ideas included suggestions of: • Text messages • Apps • Alarms These alerts would remind them to take medicine. Some are currently using their phones to remind them already (setting an alarm) but many suggest that an app or receiving a text message would be helpful. • The comments involving using the smart phone were from the segments under 56 years old. There were no mentions from anyone over 56. • Interestingly, almost half of all comments among the 36-55 year olds were to utilize their phones.
  34. 34. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 34 Ideas Utilizing Computer Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas Computer Utilization–Email (15% of comments) Some of the respondents (across all ages) felt email reminders would be useful. The comments included reminders to take medicine daily as well as messages from the pharmacy reminding them to refill their medicines. No one mentioned that their pharmacy was currently doing that. New Ideas–Packaging/Novelties (<10% of comments) There were a handful of new ideas revolving around packaging, etc. Most had to do with ideas for alarms.
  35. 35. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 35 Brainstorming Ideas: “Pillbox” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “I want a box for them” (18-35) • “Pill boxes, the date and time written on it clearly” (18-35) • “Having a pill box with the days of the week on it helps remind me to take my medicine and also so I don’t take my medicine twice” (36-55) • “I have a pill box and I love it” (36-55) • “I use a seven day pill box to make sure I take care of taking my meds everyday” (36-55) • “I use pill boxes with the days of the week and am/pm” (36-55) • “Pill boxes for each day of the week” (36-55) • “Each month I place my medications into pill boxes so that I have enough for 4 weeks. I start on whatever day it is and if I miss a dose I know right away by looking at the case. I then take them if I have forgotten, but that only happens maybe twice a year, and like I said if I don’t take them then it hurts very much to walk, so I don’t usually forget to take them” (56-65)
  36. 36. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 36 Brainstorming Ideas: “Pillbox” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “I take more meds than noted, I also take COPD meds. I have a pill box that works really good for me. I load them every week. With my inhalers, I write on a little notepad when I used them so I don’t overuse the inhalers” (56-65) • “I use a pill box and place it at a certain spot I have to look at everyday so it reminds me to take my medicine, sometimes I use my smart phone, sometimes I use online tools if I am online and don’t remember to take my meds” (56-65) • “I use a pill box now, and it is helpful.Thank you for offering” (56-65) • “I use pill boxes for the week. It helps me to tell if I have taken my pills” (56-65) • “I use pill boxes with the days of the week, seems to work” (56-65)
  37. 37. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 37 Brainstorming Ideas: “Pillbox” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “Nothing really. I have a pill box and take my pills the same time each morning” (56-65) • “Pill box on kitchen counter” (56-65) • “Pill boxes. I take my insulin at set hours so I really don’t need anything to remind me” (56-65) • “There are some people that are forgetful and if they have and check email daily this might be an accurate way to remind. Older people may not have/use email so a daily phone reminder from their healthcare provider may be a good thing. Using daily/weekly pill usage containers may also be good” (over 65) • “Currently use pill boxes w/days of week on it. Nothing else is needed” (over 65) • “No I use a pill box” (over 65)
  38. 38. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 38 Brainstorming Ideas: “Nothing” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “None of the above. I take my medication when I need it, which is how it was prescribed to me” (18-35) • “I do not have an issue for taking it, I put it on my nightstand and when I wake up I take it, every day around the same time.This works for me very well” (36-55) • “I take my medicine at the same time each day. I keep my pills next to my bed by the alarm” (36-55). • “Nothing really, since my schedule is pretty routine” (36-55) • “I always take it at the same time every day. I take it at dinner time” (56-65) • “I can not think of anything. I take my medication once a day prior to going to bed” (56-65) • “My pain is all the reminder I need” (56-65)
  39. 39. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 39 Brainstorming Ideas: “Nothing” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “Nothing needed. I just take in morning along with breakfast juice as matter of course” (56-65) • “I take drugs at certain times of the day” (over 65) • “I don’t need any help. I always take them on time” (over 65) • “I don’t need reminders. I always remember” (over 65) • “I play a Dale Carnegie trick, a sentence that makes sense and gives me hints as to time of day for doses, i.e., (10) ten to (2) six (6) o’clock! When I say ten two six that gives me a rhythmic sentence that reminds me of the three times in every 18 for the methadone, with the 12 = 4 = 8 = coming two hours in between. It may sound a bit complicated, BUT IT WORKS EVERYTIME” (over 65)
  40. 40. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 40 Brainstorming Ideas: “Smart Phone” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “A text message on my phone so it’s the first thing I see every day the first time I go to use it” (18-35) • “An alarm that is always with me. I currently use my cell phone but it would be easier if there was something smaller to remind me” (18-35) • “An app for your smartphone would be a good idea. One where you could customize the settings that tells you what drug to take, and maybe an app that automatically calls in a reminder” (36-55) • “An alarm system on my phone where I could enter pill names and times all on one alarm. Currently my phone only holds 5 alarms and I take meds more than that a day, and I would have to set all of them individually which would be a pain. I can’t do this anyway because it would leave me no alarms for getting up, etc.” (36-55) • “I have a pill container that is for the days of the week and I also have an alarm on my phone that reminds me to take my pills at the time that I usually forget to take them” (36-55)
  41. 41. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 41 Brainstorming Ideas: “Smart Phone” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “I think that text messaging would be awesome. Everyone has a cell phone and an alert to take meds is easily set up” (36-55) • “I use the daily med boxes for my regular meds. An alarm or app on my smart phone set for the time I am supposed to take my meds” (36-55) • “Nothing really, I use my smart phone setup with alarms for times to take my medicines. Unless you can create a smart phone app for this and then I expect a royalty from the idea” (36-55) • “The best for me is a smart phone app that would let me know remind me of my meds and times and alarms to remind me” (36-55) • “Maybe a text reminder during the same time every morning” (36-55) • “Pill box, alarm on my phone, email reminders for myself” (36-55)
  42. 42. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 42 Brainstorming Ideas: “Smart Phone” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “Email reminders would be a good idea” (18-35). • “Reminder to take my meds maybe by email would help or an app to remind me” (36-55) • “An app for medication reminders or emails” (36-55) • “An email would be helpful” (56-65) • “Email reminders may help, generally don’t have trouble remembering my meds” (56-65) • “I do need something. Even though I have one pill to take I find myself forgetting. I think having a pill box for one pill would not help me remember. A reminder in an email would make me get off my chair to go take my meds” (56-65) • “Pill boxes with days of the week on it. Email from pharmacy before refill date” (56-65)
  43. 43. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 43 Brainstorming Ideas: “Computer/Email” Sample Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “Since this medication is an inhaler, pill boxes would not work. An email reminder would be great or a timer set on my computer that would ding or beep when I am not logged onto the internet. A small decorative timer that could be worn as a necklace or bracelet would be ideal” (56-65) • “Daily emails could help since I read my emails each day” (over 65). • “Emails from pharmacy” (over 65)
  44. 44. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 44 Brainstorming Ideas: “New Packaging/Miscellaneous”Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “Flashing light on the fridge” (36-55) • “An automatic pill dispenser would be nice, something I could fill on a weekly or monthly basis and have it dispense the pills I need. If I need certain pills in the morning a push of the button and it doles the quantity I need out. Same thing for the rest of the day. I picture this as being able to be on the fridge with magnets or able to install on a wall. It would need to have biometrics or password so only you and no one could access the pills” (36-55) • “A clock that says please take meds before u eat” (56-65) • “A pill box with an alarm on it or an actual phone call instead of an email alert. A program that displays alerts on yourTV or computer screen, like caller ID” (56-65) • “An electronic timer that the medications and times to be taken could be programmed into and at the designated times an alarm would sound off” (56-65) • “Counter rack design to hold bottles of pills so it is always in sight” (56-65)
  45. 45. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 45 Brainstorming Ideas: “New Packaging/Miscellaneous”Verbatims Compliance: Brainstorming Ideas • “An electronic timer that the medications and times to be taken could be programmed into and at the designated times an alarm would sound off” (56-65) • “Counter rack design to hold bottles of pills so it is always in sight” (56-65) • “Since I have different meds to take at different times of the day and night I would like to see a medicine box that was for a month that had some sort of timer for u to put on the day that would go off when it was time to take your meds and could be programmed for more than 4 times in a day” (more than 65)
  46. 46. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 46 Detailed Findings Compliance Rated Usefulness of Listed Ideas
  47. 47. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 47 Perceived Usefulness of Ideas Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas • Respondents rated the usefulness of 14 “ideas that could help you to take your medicine as prescribed and that would be made available to you at no cost” • Discount Coupons received the highest “useful” and “very useful” responses, followed by educational material • Communication from pharmacy either as text, email or call was rated as the next most useful, followed by an online diary • Differences were found regarding usefulness between the different age segments surveyed (charts following pages) • Differences were also found where comparisons could be made between 2007 and 2013 (chart following pages)
  48. 48. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 48 Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas
  49. 49. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 49 Overall, the respondents in 2013 were more responsive to all communication suggestions to increase compliance.The most significant differences were more positive ratings to phone calls.This is probably explained by the increase of cell phone ownership over the time period, making them easier to reach. Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas
  50. 50. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 50 Detailed Findings Compliance Rated Usefulness of Each Idea by Age (Note: the 18-35 year old group likes to be communicated with in ALL ways so many of their answers are higher.They are used to being connected at all times (via smart phones and computers) so they may not see the reminders as an annoyance.)
  51. 51. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 51 Discount Coupons Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age Discount coupons were the highest evaluated idea. 67% of all respondents thought this was a useful idea. All age groups felt this was a useful idea.
  52. 52. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 52 Educational Materials on the Benefits/Side Effects Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age The second highest-rated idea overall was educational materials. 55% of all respondents thought this was a useful idea (half of those felt it was very useful, half useful).Younger people thought this was more useful than older people.
  53. 53. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 53 ReminderText Message from Pharmacy Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age Text communication from the pharmacy is perceived to be very useful. 52% of all respondents thought receiving a text from the pharmacy was useful.There were major differences in age and evaluation of usefulness of text messages. As expected, younger groups rated text messages higher. In fact, this was the second highest-rated idea following coupons for those under 56.
  54. 54. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 54 Reminder Call from Pharmacy Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 52% of all respondents also thought reminder calls from the pharmacy were a useful idea. More felt it was useful than very useful. While there is some variation in ages, all ages found this to be a useful idea. For younger people, a text was rated higher than a phone call from pharmacy.
  55. 55. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 55 Reminder Email from Pharmacy Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 52% of all respondents thought that emails from the pharmacy was a useful idea.This method was less favorable to the 56-65 age segment than the other segments. For the segments under 56, email was not rated as highly as text from pharmacy.
  56. 56. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 56 Online Diary of Medication Usage Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 51% of all respondents thought this was a useful idea.Those over 65 years old felt it would be less useful than the younger groups. Perhaps they are less inclined to use their computers to track their behaviors.
  57. 57. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 57 Reminder Calls from Physician’s Office Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 48% of all respondents thought reminder calls from the physician’s office was a useful idea, although only 18% found it very useful.
  58. 58. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 58 Reminder Email from Physician Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 48% of all respondents also felt a reminder email from the physician’s office was a useful idea. For the groups under 56, reminder emails from the pharmacy and physician’s office were rated equally.
  59. 59. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 59 ReminderText Message from Physician’s Office Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 48% of all respondents thought a text message from the physician’s office was a useful idea. Again, this idea was rated very highly by the youngest segment and this idea was rated very high among the 36-55 segment, as was text messaging from pharmacy for this group (71% useful).
  60. 60. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 60 Mobile App Reminder Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 44% of all respondents thought this was a useful idea. None of those over 65 felt it was a useful idea, but those younger than 56 were very favorable. Among the youngest group, an app was rated as high as a text.
  61. 61. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 61 Ability toTalk to Medical Affairs Department of Pharmaceutical Company Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age 42% of all respondents thought talking to a pharmaceutical company was a useful idea. Those over 65 were much less favorable towards the idea.
  62. 62. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 62 Reminder Postcard from Physician Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age Only 14% of all respondents felt postcards were a very useful form of reminder.Those under 35 like this form of communication better than other segments.
  63. 63. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 63 Reminder Postcard from Pharmacy Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age Only 11% of all respondents felt postcards from a pharmacy was a very useful idea. Those under 35 like this form of communication better than other segments.
  64. 64. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 64 Community Blogs Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age Community blogs received the lowest rating of all the ideas, with 31% feeling they are a useful reminder. 42% of all respondents thought this was a useful idea.
  65. 65. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 65 SummaryTable of “Top Ideas” Compliance: Usefulness of Ideas by Age The highest-rated ideas varied across age segments: • 18-35Top Idea - ReminderText Pharmacy • 36-55Top Idea - Coupons • 56-65Top Idea - Coupons • Over 65Top Idea - Emails Pharmacy
  66. 66. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 66 Detailed Findings Compliance Ideas Ranked Most Useful
  67. 67. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 67 Idea Ranking: Idea Perceived to be “Most Useful” Compliance: Most Useful Ideas Following their rating of all ideas, respondents were asked which 3 ideas they found to be most useful. Discount coupons, the online diary and reminder emails from the physician’s office generated the highest “Most Useful” rankings for the total sample.
  68. 68. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 68 SummaryTable of “Top Ideas” Compliance: Most Useful Ideas The highest-rated ideas varied across age segments: • 18-35 Call from Pharmacy • 36-55 Mobile App Reminder • 56-65 Online Diary • Over 65 Emails from Doctor or Pharmacy Note:These results varied somewhat from the highest ideas when they were rated on the previous table.
  69. 69. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 69 Idea Ranking: Estimated Frequency of Use 39% of the respondents indicated that they would use their preferred reminder daily; another 25% said monthly. Compliance: Most Useful Ideas
  70. 70. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 70 Detailed Findings Sources of Information Usage of Social Media to Discuss Healthcare Issues
  71. 71. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 71 DoYou Ever Use Social Media, Such as Facebook, to DiscussYour Healthcare Issues? 34% of all respondents say they use social media to discuss healthcare issues. Sources of Information: Social Media
  72. 72. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 72 The Vast Majority of RespondentsThat Use Social Media to Discuss Healthcare Issues Use Facebook Sources of Information: Social Media Verbatims Ages 18-35 • “Facebook” • “Facebook social” • “Facebook to talk to others about similar conditions” • “Facebook, blogs” Ages 36-55 • “Facebook looking at medical companies” • “Facebook” • “Facebook and linkedTwitter” • “Facebook andTwitter”
  73. 73. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 73 Social Media Verbatims Sources of Information: Social Media • “Facebook, Myspace” • “I interact with friends who suffer the same thing” • “I use Facebook and Pinterest and discuss with other patients like me” • “I use Facebook and only chat with my friends. All in all I have a great support system” • “I use Facebook but not regarding my healthcare” • “Just the cost of healthcare, Obamacare” • “Sometime we have same condition, we can help together” • “Web MD” Ages 56-65 • “Facebook. Once in a while I’ll reference a medical or healthcare issue and ask for some feedback...or respond to someone else’s comment/question. I also read/post share information about health-related issues” • “Facebook..talk with friends” • “I discuss health with friends and family on what conditions they have and what they do to remind themselves when to take medication”
  74. 74. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 74 Social Media Verbatims Sources of Information: Social Media • “I use Facebook and I just talk with my fb friends about my health issues and they talk about theirs” • “I use my social media for interacting with groups. Something in relation to a problem” • “WebMD.com, Mayo Clinic, quality health website, don’t use Facebook for my meds, use tools online” Over 65 • “I Would NOT use social media for healthcare issues. Privacy concerns” • “Use Facebook. I make comments about how I’m feeling and get responses from those who have had same experiences with suggestions”
  75. 75. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 75 Detailed Findings Sources of Information Contact Healthcare Plan
  76. 76. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 76 Frequency of Contact with Healthcare Plan for Information on Condition, Medical Diseases or Drugs People do not have their healthcare plan on speed dial. Half the people rarely call their healthcare plan. Only 16% say they contact them frequently.The younger group contact them more often. Perhaps they are newer to their conditions/medicines. Sources of Information: Healthcare Plan
  77. 77. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 77 Detailed Findings Sources of Information Top of Mind
  78. 78. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 78 Sources of Healthcare Information Respondents were asked, “When thinking about all the sources you can go to for healthcare information, list the two you use the most.” The table below summarizes their open-ended responses. Sources of Information: Healthcare Plan
  79. 79. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 79 Sources of Healthcare Information Sources of Information:Top of Mind • We know from the previous table that people are not contacting their healthcare plan for information; instead they go to their physicians and the internet. • Just as many people use the internet (44% of mentions) as their top source of information as use the personal connection of their physician, pharmacist or family/friend (45% of mentions). • People under 35 years of age mention the internet more than twice as often (67%) as a personal connection (26%). • People 36-54 source the internet (50%) a little more than a personal connection (44%). • People over 55 rely most heavily on their physicians. • Most of the internet searches are general search engine searches, but WebMD is cited by 12% of all respondents as where they go for information most often. • Only 9% say they use their healthcare plan as their primary source of information.
  80. 80. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 80 Detailed Findings Perceptions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
  81. 81. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 81 Which DescribesYour Reaction to the Passage of the New Healthcare Bill Known as the “Affordable Care Act”? The largest proportion (41%) have no opinion yet on the passage of the Bill. 35% are happy it passed and 24% are not happy. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
  82. 82. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 82 Perception of Act by Age The youngest group and the oldest group are a little happier it passed than the 36-65 year olds.The 18-35 year olds are the most positive with 47% happy it passed. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act
  83. 83. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 83 “Happy Act Passed”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act The majority of those that are happy it passed felt it was for the greater good of society.There were very few references to their own specific benefits. • “Because I think it will benefit Americans” (18-35) • “Could save me money” (18-35) • “I think all people should have access to healthcare, especially preventative care, to keep them from having to go to the emergency room later on and costing us even more” (18-35) • “I’m not completely happy with it but it’s a step in the right direction” (18-35) • “It makes it easier to afford” (18-35) • “Because if I can’t afford my medicine I can get help” (36-55) • “Because medical is very expensive” (36-55) • “I don’t have enough money to pay my bills” (36-55) • “I think it is a good thing” (36-55) • “I think, with all the money this country spends aiding other countries, we need to be helping ourselves” (36-55)
  84. 84. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 84 “Happy Act Passed”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • “It helps people in need” (36-55) • “No insurance right now, so I hope it will help me get the care I need, low cost clinics are useless” (36-55) • “So that everyone can have healthcare” (36-55) • “Because everyone should be able to afford healthcare and they could not the way the healthcare companies were charging people” (56-65) • “Because it is important” (56-65) • “Cause everyone should have the right to health insurance” (56-65) • “EVERYONE NEEDS COVERAGE” (56-65) • “Everyone should have access to affordable medical care” (56-65) • “Healthcare should be made available to as many people as possible. My only concern is that the law doesn’t go far enough in so far as providing single payer coverage” (56-65) • “Hopefully, it is a stepping stone for single-payer healthcare” (56-65) • “I am glad that more people will be covered by health insurance” (56-65)
  85. 85. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 85 “Happy Act Passed”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • “I don’t think it’s perfect and not as comprehensive as needed to be effective (e.g. cost-saving, universal), but it’s a step in the right direction” (56-65) • “It was the 1st step in correcting of healthcare system” (56-65) • “We need all the extra help we can get” (56-65) • “So they don’t put any burdens on the elderly and disabled” (56-65) • “Because I think it is necessary to give all Americans good healthcare” (65+) • “Because it can help people obtain healthcare at an affordable price” (65+) • “Helps many people” (65+) • “It will help me pay for medical expenses” (65+) • “It cuts costs all around the circle, and brings good healthcare to so many more who never had a chance to afford it before. A double header!” (65+)
  86. 86. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 86 “No Opinion on Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act In general these people do not know how the Act will affect them so they feel they will have to wait and see. • “Have to wait” (18-35) • “I really don’t trust it at this point. I need to see more of what it is all about” (18-35) • “Not sure of the facts” (18-35) • “New plan, new year has started so have to see what new plan is going to do to impact me and my economy” (18-35) • “I want to wait first” (18-35) • “I don’t know anything about this issue” (36-55) • “I don’t know much about it, so I’ll have to see what it is and the cost” (36-55) • “I don’t know the specifics, and I’m on Medicare so I’m not sure how it affects me” (36-55) • “I have no issues with my health plan, my company pays all of it for me, and all its employees. I am not sure it is is going to effect us for now” (36-55) • “I want to see how it will benefit me” (36-55) • “I really am confused about that bill, needs to be simplified for me” (36-55)
  87. 87. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 87 “No Opinion on Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • “I need to wait and see how it works” (36-55) • “It’s too soon to know that much. I did however see that big companies are cutting employees hours back to avoid having to pay for their health insurances. I feel this is a bad flaw and cheap” (36-55) • “Wouldn’t know enough for my opinion to count” (36-55) • “You have to wait to see what happens to your healthcare plan” (36-55) • “Need to wait and see if it works the way it is supposed to” (36-55) • “I am not sure how it will benefit me” (56-65) • “I need to see just how this bill will affect both my health insurance coverage and those who presently do not have coverage” (56-65) • “Law is confusing” (56-65) • “I really don‘t completely understand how it is going to work. I would like to see exactly how it is going to impact my financial situation, medical costs and healthcare” (56-65) • “Need to see what is actually in it that will affect me” (56-65) • “Not real familiar with” (56-65)
  88. 88. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 88 “No Opinion on Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • “Not sure exactly how it will affect me, not sure what it says” (56-65) • “When a President gets re-elected they make all these promises and some come up with their solution but what is good for some is bad for others so I have to wait and see where I fall, and friends and loved ones, especially the elderly” (56-65) • “I don’t know how it will effect me yet” (65+) • “I don’t know the details and I don’t want to make a judgement before I know more. Initially, I was against it” (65+) • “I don’t know all the details of this. I know some of them but they don’t really directly affect me” (65+) • “I don’t understand what it is all about and how it will affect me” (65+) • “I have good health insurance” (65+) • “The devil is always in the details. And so it remains to be seen whether it is a good idea or not. I must say, though, that I don’t expect it to be much other than a good start” (65+)
  89. 89. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 89 “Against Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Over half the comments regarding why respondents were against the Act dealt with the perception that costs would go up. • “Because of the “tax” that the government says is a penalty, yet will be collected through the IRS, think it might put small business out of business, it will increase the cost of ALL healthcare, most plans have a minimum of $5,000 up to $20,000 dollars, just looks very expensive”(36-55) • “It will change my insurance and cost me more, limit my choices” (36-55) • “My insurance has changed for the worst. I pay more and get so little” (36-55) • “Too many hidden costs” (36-55) • “I know some of the particles [sic] of the cost per person and they are unreasonable and ridiculous” (56-65)
  90. 90. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 90 “Against Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act • “Increase cost and taxes” (56-65) • “I think I will end of paying more” (56-65) • “People aren’t going to be able to afford any insurance with families that have children and don’t make much, same with senior citizens” (56-65) • “If this is ‘Obamacare’ it will force people with very little income to get medical coverage. I think it will also cause the general population to see an increase in medical costs” (65+) • “It has virtually nothing to do with healthcare and has only made healthcare more expensive” (65+)
  91. 91. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 91 “Against Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Others against it felt it was bad for our society. • “Because it is NOT about healthcare, it is about political power and taking freedoms away” (36-54) • “I can’t afford health insurance and now the dumb ass president wants to force me to buy it. Where is the money going to magically appear?” (36-54) • “It is going to hurt a lot of older people, and it is unfair to force an individual to buy health insurance while the economy is in such a deplorable condition” (36-54) • “No one should push another” (36-54) • “The changes that are going to be made are not going to be beneficial to veterans/ retired military or active duty members” (36-54) • “It is under the authority of the IRS. Aside from black ops programs, they are the most reckless agency in our government.They only know money and how to ruin lives, not a thing about healthcare.This will turn into a nightmare when they decide you can afford healthcare even though 30% of your income goes to drugs alone. It’s for healthy people only” (55-64) • “It’s a communist takeover of people.The lefties want to turn this into a communist country where they control everyone and everything” (55-64)
  92. 92. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 92 “Against Act”Verbatims Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act A few people felt the passage of the Act would have a negative affect on finding physicians. • “Doctors won’t earn money so they’ll leave.That means less good doctors left.” (18-35) • “I have fears about being able to see the doctor in a timely manner and the cost of my insurances to help pay for those who can’t afford healthcare” (36-54) • “Not enough doctors” (56-65)
  93. 93. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 93 Making Plans to Address the Impact the New Law Might Have onThem orTheir Family Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act 22% of all respondents say they are making some plan to address the impact of when the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is enforced.There were a few in each age range. Among those people who are planning, most are still trying to educate themselves on the plan and how they can save money. A couple have changed plans. • “I am trying to find out every thing I can about it, looking into what will be the best plan for my family” • “I’ve contacted my provider to give me updates on any changes to my health plan” • “Joined a Medicare supported HMO directly instead of contributing to the costs of Medicare.The HMO works hard to keep costs down since they are “for profit”, which the huge apparatus that keeps Medicare going does NOT!” • “Keep studying the new law” • “Saving more money to defer the cost of medical visits and pharmacy costs” • “Saving up and looking for better insurance” • “Talk to my doctor”
  94. 94. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 94 Respondent Characteristics
  95. 95. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 95 Respondent Characteristics
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  101. 101. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 101 Appendix: Screener and Questionnaire
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  106. 106. Healthcare Communications Study Among Patients | ©2013 Star Group Communications, Inc. 106 Tim R. Garde Managing Partner Star Group / Star Life Sciences Synegrated Communications 235 S. 17th Street Philadelphia, PA 19103 215.875.4313 stargroup1.com starlifebrands.com For more information please contact:

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