Guiding university ip emes presentation 2013

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  • uk definition includes profits as primarily reinvested for social aims, but the EU definition includes ‘transparency’ of business operations mainly by involving workers, customers, and stakeholders.
  • Guiding university ip emes presentation 2013

    1. 1. DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE COPY BY GOING TO WWW.UNLTD.ORG.UK OR SEARCHING THE INTERNET FOR: FROM IDEAS TO SOCIAL ENTERPRISE: A GUIDE TO UTILISING UNIVERSITY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY FOR THE BENEFIT OF SOCIETY Josh Lange, University College London EMES Conference, July 2013 Contact: jl387@exeter.ac.uk
    2. 2. FIRST PROBLEM: WHY DO UNIVERSITIES NEED GUIDANCE ON UTILISING INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY FOR THE BENEFIT OF SOCIETY?
    3. 3. SECOND PROBLEM: WHO WOULD YOU PUT ON A TEAM TO WRITE A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE FOR CREATING SOCIAL ENTERPRISES WITH UNIVERSITY KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND RESEARCH?
    4. 4. SOLUTION: BUILD A DIVERSE AND KNOWLEDGE-BASED TEAM  Professor Muki Haklay, UCL Engineering (project owner and research supervisor)  Ana Lemmo-Charnalia, UCL, Enterprise (project manager and content writer)  Josh Lange, UCL, Language Centre (editor and content writer)  Hannah McDowall, Madeleine Gabriel, UnLtd. (content writers)  Sonia Nikolovski, University of Manchester TTO (content writer)  Gillian Green, University of Manchester (content writer)  External consultants: Legal, Accounting, and Graphic Design
    5. 5. THIRD PROBLEM: GETTING THE LANGUAGE RIGHT
    6. 6. SOLUTION: WHAT DO WE MEAN BY „SOCIAL ENTERPRISE‟ IN RELATION TO HIGHER EDUCATION?  Academics love definitions  Ouch! There are differences even between the official UK and EU definitions of SE  Most formal definitions of SE will carry the basic idea that a social enterprise is a business that uses its surpluses to achieve social objectives.  But it‟s important to emphasize that SE „addresses neglected societal problems‟ (Santos 2012)  Similarities/differences to a for-profit business  Defining through registered organisational form
    7. 7. SOLUTION: WHAT DOES „INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY‟ MEAN IN THE UNIVERSITY CONTEXT? • Design, trademarks, patents, copyrightFormal IP • Specialised information that assists the licensee or assignee in the use of the IP. This might include technical (e.g. a secret method or recipe, unpublished research findings) or non-technical information (exclusive marketing or business information). Some know-how might be protected by confidentiality agreements or by copyright laws. Subject matter expertise • Materials that might be needed by the IP licensee/assignee in order to produce the service/product. These materials may not be available elsewhere and so a separate agreement relating to the transfer of these materials from the HEI to the licensee/assignee will be needed. Tangible items
    8. 8. SOLUTION: THE GUIDE MUST COMMUNICATE TO MULTIPLE STAKEHOLDERS IN UNIVERSITY IP “Terms borrowed from the corporate lexicon…invariably grates on the academic mind and threatens to widen the gulf between faculty and administration” (Bok, 2003, p.335). Social Enterprises Utilising University IP:  Utilise the high level of skills, knowledge and abilities of academic and research staff  Impact positively on HEI communities, particularly in inner city areas by addressing relevant social and environmental problems  Enrich the learning and research experience by testing ideas for solutions of social and environmental problems in everyday economic environments  Align with HEI charitable goals and public relations initiatives
    9. 9. WHAT LANGUAGE DID WE NEED TO CHANGE TO COMMUNICATE TO ALL STAKEHOLDERS?  „Creating sustainable solutions with IP‟  „Utilising IP for the benefit of society‟  Negotiating in-principle agreements  Formulating in-principle agreements  Negotiating the use of IP  Agreeing on the use of IP  Technology transfer office  Knowledge transfer office
    10. 10. FOURTH PROBLEM: PHILOSOPHICAL POSITIONING
    11. 11. POSITION 1: MONEY IS THE ROOT OF ALL UNIVERSITY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY  “Universities share one characteristic with compulsive gamblers and exiled royalty: there is never enough money to satisfy their desires” - Derek Bok, 2003
    12. 12. POSITION 2: DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD DO UNTO YOUR UNIVERSITY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY  “Social enterprise plays an important role and resonates particularly with UCL, which it might be argued, was originally set up as a social enterprise” – Stephen Caddick, 2013 (in the foreword to the Guide)
    13. 13. SOLUTION: SANTOS‟S (2012) VERSION OF ADAM SMITH‟S ECONOMIC AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY Self-Interest Edifice Others-Regarding Edifice Sustainable Competitive Advantage Logic of Control (5 Forces) IP Protection and Trade Secrets Maximize Profits Firms Capture Value Incentives Self-Interest Sustainable solutions Logic of Empowerment Share knowledge, Open Source Maximize Societal Impact Community / Solution Create Value Intrinsic Motivation Others-Regarding
    14. 14. SOLUTION: NEW UK/EU POLICIES REQUIRE UNIVERSITY IP TO BENEFIT SOCIETY  RCUK Excellence to Impact Framework (2012): „improving health and well-being‟, „enhancing the research capacity, knowledge and skills of public, private and third-sector organisations‟ „environmental sustainability, protection and impact‟ and „enhancing cultural enrichment and quality of life‟  UK Public Services Act (2013): social value must be considered as part of all public sector commissioning processes  European Commission SBI (25.10.2011): research should support employability, social inclusion, and ethical trade  Higher Education Funding Council for England (2012): HEIs have vast but largely untapped capacity to build the next generation of financially profitable and environmentally sustainable social enterprises
    15. 15. FIFTH PROBLEM: THE GUIDE MUST SUPPORT BOTH ACADEMIC SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS AND KTO STAFF TO MAKE GOOD DECISIONS ABOUT IP
    16. 16.  One-page university IP social business sketch checklist  Relationship matrix between knowledge transfer offices and social entrepreneurs  Process of agreeing on university IP scenario tool  In-principle agreement negotiation preparation questionnaire  University intellectual property social benefit equity formula  Social impact measurement principles and categories for university IP  Model agreements that adhere to UK contract law  Case studies from diverse faculties, university contexts, and organisational forms SOLUTION: PRACTICAL TOOLS THAT EVEN AN ACADEMIC ECONOMIST CAN USE
    17. 17. EXAMPLE: UNLTD. PRINCIPLES FOR MEASURING IMPACT  Decide what to measure  Identify robust indicators of outputs and outcomes  Decide what types of evidence are needed
    18. 18. EXAMPLE: MEASURING IMPACT OF UIP Beneficiaries Results Costs Alternatives Benefits Externalities
    19. 19. EXAMPLE: MEASURING IMPACT OF UIP  Beneficiaries: What information about the beneficiaries is relevant to organisational aims? (e.g. age, sex, disability, employment status, etc.).  Results: What measureable outcomes does this social venture actually achieve? (e.g. number of patients saved by a university- developed heart-monitoring device in a specified time period).  Costs: How much does it cost to provide each service? (e.g. some organisations calculate the cost of volunteers as if they were paid minimum wage).  Alternatives: What would have happened if the social venture had never intervened? (e.g. 1 million patients in developing countries would be unable to afford a life-saving treatment).  Benefits: How can the value of this social venture be shown? (e.g. short/long term quantitative results OR a financial cost determined concerning the implications for society - i.e. alternatives - without this venture).  Positive Externalities: Are there any unplanned benefits coming out of this social venture that can be quantified? (e.g. beneficiaries or staff supplement the existing technology with a profit-making enhancement)
    20. 20. THANKS FOR LISTENING DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE COPY OF „THE GUIDE‟ BY GOING TO WWW.UNLTD.ORG.UK OR SEARCHING THE INTERNET FOR: FROM IDEAS TO SOCIAL ENTERPRISE: A GUIDE TO UTILISING UNIVERSITY INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY FOR THE BENEFIT OF SOCIETY Contact Josh Lange: jl387@exeter.ac.uk

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