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End Resource Management Smackdowns: How To Make Allocating a Breeze

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Digital Project Managers are masters of getting things done without doing “anything:” They take talented resources, enable them to work together so seamlessly that the sum is much greater than the parts.

That said, figuring out who is doing what and when is one the supreme challenges of an agency. Resource conflicts are inevitable and, often, chaotic.

During this session, we will explore the problem provide some tangible solutions by looking at the people, processes and tools that need to be leveraged to get this done.

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End Resource Management Smackdowns: How To Make Allocating a Breeze

  1. 1. End Resource Management Smackdowns How To Make Allocating a Breeze
  2. 2. Who do we have in our audience? ● Agency DPM? ● In House DPM? ● How long have you been a Digital PM? ○ <1 | 5 | 10 | 20+ ● How many other Digital PMs are there in your organization? ○ 0 | 1 | 5 | 10 + ● Who has unlimited resources and never has a resource conflict ever?
  3. 3. Goal Provide prescriptive guidance on making resource management within a digital agency/organization as smooth as possible
  4. 4. Agenda ● About Me ● Reason for Resource Smackdowns ● How to Avoid the Smackdowns
  5. 5. About Me Who is this person talking to you?
  6. 6. Josh Zapin, CSM, PMP: ● Nearly 20 years of building digital applications/websites/teams ● Director of Operations/Production/Project Management for several agencies and eCommerce organizations ● Scrum Certified (CSM) for 5 years; PMI (PMP certified) for 14 years ● Started Corvus3 to consult Digital Agencies/Orgs on improving operations Who is this person talking to you?
  7. 7. Who is this person talking to you?
  8. 8. People are what you need to make it happen
  9. 9. But there aren’t enough people to make it happen UNLIMITED RESOURCES RESOURCE CONFLICTS RESOURCE ALLOCATION
  10. 10. Resource Allocation How to end smackdowns in 3 steps
  11. 11. PEOPLE PROCESSTOOLS Three “lenses” 1 2
  12. 12. PEOPLE Improvement pillars follow a linear pattern 1
  13. 13. Step #1 - People Somebody has to worry about it
  14. 14. Who are involved? Who owns it? Organizational Overseers: ● Chief Operations Officer ● Director of Project Management/Production Resource Requesters: ● Project Managers ● Producers Resource Owners: ● Technology Director ● Creative Director ● Chief Technology Officer ● Chief Creative Officer
  15. 15. Someone has to sweat the resource allocation details Ideally, it’s not an “in the trenches” PMs/Producers: ● Need someone to see “above” the project at hand ● Adherence to the organization rather than a particular project ● Must be objective about resource needs
  16. 16. Who should own it? Organizational Overseers: ● Chief Operations Officer ● Diretor of Project Management/Production Resource Requesters: ● Project Managers ● Producers Resource “Owners:” ● Technology Director ● Creative Director ● Chief Technology Officer ● Chief Creative Officer
  17. 17. As a last resort: A Project Manager In smaller organizations, it could be a Project Manager if: ● There is only one PM in the group ● There is a PM with Director/Manager wherewithal/desires
  18. 18. PEOPLE Define who is involved/Make someone responsible PROCESS Improvement pillars follow a linear pattern 1 2
  19. 19. Step # 2 - Process Allocations need regular nurturing
  20. 20. Conflicts occur when you least expect it Problem: Their project was having trouble and needed temporary .net help ASAP Solution: My project had .net developers and could spare a few to help out New Problem: How do you make sure you don’t mess up both projects? Solution: A weekly resource allocation process to deal with change
  21. 21. Solution: Allocate at a regular interval (weekly)
  22. 22. Notes: ● Each shape represents WHAT will be done ● WHO will do it is noted in the the “swimlane” for that process. They can span multiple roles ● WHEN a process will be done is noted in the columns ● Processes could have many tasks that aren’t detailed ● Sub-processes have more processes where other roles are, potentially, responsible How to read swimlane flowcharts
  23. 23. Regular Allocation: Who is involved?
  24. 24. Regular Weekly Allocation: What is being done?
  25. 25. Regular Allocation: When to do it?
  26. 26. PEOPLE Define who is involved/Make someone responsible PROCESS Make it regular/boring TOOLS Improvement pillars follow a linear pattern 1 23
  27. 27. Step # 3 - Tools Bring it all together and make it scalable!
  28. 28. Should you store resource allocations in your head?
  29. 29. Keeping resource allocations in your head is a bad idea ● You forget ● It’s not visible to a larger group that shares the responsibility ● Hit-by-the-bus theory of management breaks down
  30. 30. There are a lot of tools out there K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid)
  31. 31. Start simple: Use a spreadsheet Spreadsheets are simple: ● Columns/Rows/ Numbers/Calculations ● Flexibile ● Shareable/Collaborative in real time ● “Free”
  32. 32. Start with the team The Team
  33. 33. List out their function What they do
  34. 34. Keep things organized Extra Credit: Separate Sheets by Team
  35. 35. Detail out what they’re doing What they are doing
  36. 36. Detail when they are doing it? When they are doing it
  37. 37. Indicate how long it will take to do How long it will take to do it Include a total too
  38. 38. Look to the future from the organization perspective
  39. 39. Get this sheet for free! http://corvus3.com/dpmsummit2015
  40. 40. PEOPLE Make someone responsible PROCESS Make it regular/boring TOOLS Make it scalable Improvement pillars follow a linear pattern 1 23
  41. 41. Key Takeaways What you really need to do to end the smackdowns
  42. 42. If nothing else, remember these three things ● Resource Allocation is a role within an organization; even if you can’t dedicate someone, someone needs to be responsible for it (and it shouldn’t be a PM). ● To make sure it gets handled appropriately, you need to bank on a consistent process. Something that is done every interval (recommended weekly) the same way and has room to handle conflicts ● Leverage a tool to insure that it is trackable and scalable and doesn’t get in the way. A spreadsheet is a good way to start.
  43. 43. Thank you! Josh Zapin, PMP, CSM @jzapin jzapin@corvus3.com http://www.corvus3.com Meetup: Rocky Moundtain Digital Project Managers

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