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November/December 2015 Free or $5.99 mailed copy
New England's Premier Culture Magazine
ARTSCOPE PREPARES FOR ART BASEL MI...
LESLEY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN
LUNDER ARTS CENTER
NOVEMBER 8 – DECEMBER 12, 2015
reception Sunday, November 8...
Karine Léger
LANOUE GALLERY
450 HARRISON AVENUE, #31, Boston, MA 617.262.4400 INFO@LANOUEGALLERY.COM WWW.LANOUEGALLERY.COM...
THE SCHOOLHOUSE GALLERY | 494 COMMERCIAL STREET, PROVINCETOWN MA | 508.487.4800 | WWW.G A L L E R Y S C H O O L H O U S E ...
HOURS
Mon – Fri: 10 am — 6 pm
Thurs: 10 am – 7 pm
Sat: 10 am – 5 pm
T H R E E S TO N E S G A L L E R Y
JIM MCMANUS: Get Rh...
Gallery Director Patricia Purdy
www.andrewdevries.com
(413) 238-7755
Lenox, MA
International
DeVries Fine Art
Destiny
your...
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2015
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Tweet @ascopemagazine
More ...
Artscope interactive IPad
edition presents pan and zoom,
slideshows, in-depth audio/
video, links to maps of our
wanderlus...
(Editor’s note: artscope magazine
is proud to have been selected to be
included at this year’s Art Basel Miami
Beach’s Mag...
work from Jack Shainman Gallery at Art Basel Miami Beach for MOCA
Jacksonville has since appreciated about three times its...
Newport Art MuseuM FALL Exhibitions
76 Bellevue Ave. Newport, RI
newportartmuseum.org
Open: Tues.-Sat. 10-4pm Sun. 12-4pm
...
12 NOV/DEC 2015
As a clearinghouse, the mission of
Art League Rhode Island (ALRI) “is
to provide a venue for the growth
an...
The horizontal sight line on an adjacent wall begins with the
luxuriant and moody mixed-media “Beach with River” painting ...
IMMERSED IN TRADITION
This year’s ALRI show chiefly explores traditional techniques and the
artists included enjoy process...
NOV/DEC 2015 15
FITCHBURG ART
MUSEUM
185 ELM STREET
FITCHBURG,
MASSACHUSETTS
THROUGH
JANUARY 10
“Land Ho!,” the impressive...
She painted during the Depression for
the WPA’s Federal Arts Project, and
since she could not afford a studio,
she worked ...
NOV/DEC 2015 17
ald’s landscape scenes with familiar interruptions of traffic cones,
driveway reflectors and dig safe flag...
1-617-699-6401
PORTLAND MUSEUM
OF ART
7 CONGRESS STREET
PORTLAND, MAINE
THROUGH
JANUARY 3
You can’t get there from here. This timeworn Ma...
the exhibition, piquing viewers’ curiosity about the dispa-
rate works on display.
They’re also greeted by variety of bask...
casting polyester resin tinted with bubblegum-hued pigments, his
sculptures are bizarre and enchanting. Suspended within t...
HASSAN HAJJAJ’S ROCK STARS
ROCKIN’ THE CASBAH AND BEYOND
With great rhythm and swanky
style, photographer-filmmaker-
desig...
11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | Open Daily | 860.435.3663 | hotchkiss.org/arts
field kallop
November 7 - December 13, ...
Reviews
26 NOV/DEC 2015
New Art Center
in Newton
617.964.3424
www.NewArtCenter.org
61 Washington Park, Newton, MA
CONNECT ...
LEAVING OUR MARK
In Celebration of the Pencil
2 0 1 5 P R E M I E R S P O N S O R
21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA 01103...
28 MAR/APR 2015
MILLS GALLERY
BOSTON CENTER
FOR THE ARTS
539 TREMONT
STREET
BOSTON,
MASSACHUSETTS
THROUGH 	
DECEMBER 20
Er...
viewer’s vertical stance. Wall-huggers include Samantha Fields’
hanging of woven cloth and drooping skeins (“Of Two Minds”...
AShowofContemporaryArt,Craft,andDesign
artists selling work
in jewelry, clothing,
home décor, &
furniture
175
DEC.11–13, 2...
Through December 18 | Closed November 25 - 29 for Thanksgiving break
Katrina Then & Now: Artists as Witness
AN EXHIBITION ...
OLITSKI AND MCCULLOUGH IN NH
The paintings and prints in the
Jules Olitski “Lakes, Mountains,
Seas” exhibition currently o...
elements, though, are not clearly
tethered to near or distant ground,
horizon or sky. The initial impact,
rather, is of an...
The show includes several bronze sculptures that echo themes in
the paintings yet are entirely, inherently sculptural. 
A ...
MONTSERRAT
GALLERY OF ART
23 ESSEX STREET
BEVERLY,
MASSACHUSETTS
THROUGH
DECEMBER 5
With so many icons crowding into our n...
Reviews
plywood, while so many other things to the engaged imagi-
nation, is still plywood: beige, sturdy, more fit to und...
Alden Gallery
423 Commercial St., Provincetown
508.487.4230
aldengallery.com
Sharon Weiss Gallery
20 East Lincoln St., Col...
Nora Valdez’s stone sculpture
follows ancient traditions, but the
insights found in her surrealistic
visions are very much...
plaza and boulevard. Valdez continues to travel to Latin America to
organize sculpture projects and to exhibit her work.
H...
WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY 11 - 5 pm
(802) 251-8290 mitchellgiddingsfinearts.com
183 Main Street, Brattleboro VT 05301
MITCHELL • ...
Uli Brahmst, Screen 304 16 14 15
17, synthetic polymer on
canvas ULIBRAHMST.COM
Ken Steinkamp, Between
Then and Now, mixed...
SOUTH SHORE ART CENTER
119 Ripley Road, Cohasset, MA
Gallery Hours: M–S 10–4, Sun 12–4
781 383 2787 > www.ssac.org
Driftin...
THROUGH THE LENS OF HISTORY:
gct.com/grandcirclegallery @GC_Gallery
Grand Circle Gallery honors the 50th anniversary
of th...
44 MAY/JUN 2015
SOLOMON’S COLLECTION & FINE RUGS
Old man selling rug
Fine, hand-knotted pictorial rug.
Wool with silk high...
I happen to love color — the more
bold and brash, the better. I also
have a proclivity toward figurative
depiction and sym...
his work makes me recall a line from one of the diatribes of Jim
Morrison, “Out here in the perimeter, there are no stars;...
MAY/JUN 2015 47
413-854-7744
Marilyn Kalish
Vault Gallery
cool and green
45 x 85
www.marilynkalish.com
NOV/DEC 2015
CENTERFOLD
CONIGLIOCONIGLIO
BeverleyBeverley
Influenced by Art Nouveau, Art Deco, the Victorian look without
the Victorian principles, Gothic and Steampunk, Beverley i...
NEW BRITAIN MUSEUM
OF AMERICAN ART
56 LEXINGTON STREET,
NEW BRITAIN,
CONNECTICUT
WADSWORTH
ATHENEUM MUSEUM
OF ART
600 MAIN...
TOP RIGHT: Mark Dion/
Matrix 173: The Wadsworth
Atheneum’s Great Chain
of Being (exhibition detail
2015-2016), 16” x 20”
c...
In the next gallery, connecting the modernist narrative, is an
example of Pollock’s early work, a small landscape in the B...
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  1. 1. November/December 2015 Free or $5.99 mailed copy New England's Premier Culture Magazine ARTSCOPE PREPARES FOR ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH | INTERNATIONAL SCULPTOR NORA VALDEZ IN NEW BEDFORD | BIG CHANGES AT WADSWORTH, NEW BRITAIN & WORCESTER | LYNSEY ADDARIO’S VEILED REBELLION AT THE NESTO | SCOTT TULAY & RICHARD HELLER IN BRATTLEBORO YOU CAN GET THERE: BRETT BIGBEE AT THE PORTLAND BIENNIAL THE ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH ISSUE 11 12 15
  2. 2. LESLEY UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN LUNDER ARTS CENTER NOVEMBER 8 – DECEMBER 12, 2015 reception Sunday, November 8, 2-5 pm juror’s Willie Cole, contemporary conceptual and visual artist, talk and juror for Boston Printmakers Biennial Sunday, November 8, 1 pm University Hall Amphitheater, 1815 Mass. Ave. gallery Looking at Prints | Julia Talcott and Lois Tarlow talks Thursday, November 19, 6 pm | Roberts Gallery, 1801 Mass. Ave. What Makes a Great Print? | Master printer Carolyn Muskat  Saturday, December 5, 1 pm | Roberts Gallery, 1801 Mass. Ave. student The 9th Arches Student Print Exhibition exhibition VanDernoot Gallery at University Hall, 1815 Mass. Ave. Concurrent exhibition dates and opening reception. See lesley.edu/galleries for VanDernoot Gallery hours. all events free and open to the public 2015 NORTH AMERICAN PRINT BIENNIAL JennyRobinson,SanFranciscoCA,Infrastructure2,drypoint,27″×41″—WinneroftheOtisPhilbrickPurchasePrize Lunder Arts Center | 1801 Massachusetts Avenue | Porter Square, Cambridge Mon–Fri: 10 am – 5 pm (Thursday until 8 pm); Sat–Sun: 12 – 5 pm www.lesley.edu/galleries | 617.349.8010 THE BOSTON PRINTMAKERS
  3. 3. Karine Léger LANOUE GALLERY 450 HARRISON AVENUE, #31, Boston, MA 617.262.4400 INFO@LANOUEGALLERY.COM WWW.LANOUEGALLERY.COM CONTEMPORARY PAINTING, SCULPTURE PHOTOGRAPHY AND MIXED MEDIA “Un Jour d”Avril”, acrylic & mixed media on canvas, 36x60”
  4. 4. THE SCHOOLHOUSE GALLERY | 494 COMMERCIAL STREET, PROVINCETOWN MA | 508.487.4800 | WWW.G A L L E R Y S C H O O L H O U S E . CO M DECEMBER 1– 6, 2015THESCHOOLHOUSEGALLERY Cuban Artists ADRIAN FE RN A N D EZ MILANES and ALEX MIGUEL H E R N A N D E Z DUEÑAS PLEASE JOIN US AT BOOTH C11, 801 OCEAN DRIVE, MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA USA MIAMI ART WEEK
  5. 5. HOURS Mon – Fri: 10 am — 6 pm Thurs: 10 am – 7 pm Sat: 10 am – 5 pm T H R E E S TO N E S G A L L E R Y JIM MCMANUS: Get Rhythm, oil & wax on canvas, 48 x 48 inches 115 Commonwealth Ave. West Concord, MA 01742 978.254.5932 www.ThreeStonesGallery.com LIGHT LUMIÈRE LIGERO Nov 11, 2015 – Jan 13, 2016 Please visit our website for updates on our exhibit schedule. Contemporary Fine Art & Photography ALSO FEATURED: BRUCE DAVIDSON HOLLY HARRISON MARGOT KIMBALL JILL POTTLE CARE STANDLEY Opening Reception Saturday, Nov. 14, 6:00 - 8:30 pm
  6. 6. Gallery Director Patricia Purdy www.andrewdevries.com (413) 238-7755 Lenox, MA International DeVries Fine Art Destiny your Embrace In progress: the monumental Other Side of Eden, winter 2015 Challenging Times for Sculpture Extraordinary DeVries Andrew Sculptor
  7. 7. JOIN THE CONVERSATION News feeds and more NOVEMBER & DECEMBER 2015 Instagram @artscopemagazine Tweet @ascopemagazine More coverage on the zine and app with your social media commentary at zine.artscopemagazine.com Sign up for the AS email blast! and have special artscope updates landing in your inbox every two weeks! To advertise, call 1.617.639.5771 or email advertise@artscopemagazine.com To subscribe, purchase online at artscopemagazine.com or email subscribe@artscopemagazine.com Volume 10 • Number 5 Published by Boston Publishing House LLC Copyright 2015 Artscope Magazine All Rights Reserved. ISSN#1932-0582. artscope reserves the right to edit all material Reproduction in part or whole without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscribe to the artscope magazine tablet edition on Newsstand to receive each issue instantly. Now available worldwide on your iPad. Search Artscope in your App Store. GET THE MOBILE APP! SUBSCRIBE TO NEWSSTAND! artscope for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on th... https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/artscope/id6357... http://kaywa.me/wMq1h Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code! artscope - Android Apps auf Google Play https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=c... http://kaywa.me/0PqVg Download the Kaywa QR Code Reader (App Store &Android Market) and scan your code! FEATURES Cover story: 20 Portland Museum of Art 2015 Biennial Featured Artist: 38 Nora Valdez at Colo Colo Featured Museums: 50 New Britain Museum of American Art & Wadsworth Atheneum Featured Exhibition: 70 Katrina Then and Now at Holy Cross Featured Exhibition: 74 Printmakers Biennial at Lesley Featured Exhibition: 76 Lynsey Addario at Milton Academy COMMUNITY Community: 82 ArtUp Lowell REVIEWS ALRI at Newport 12 Land Ho! at Fitchburg 15 Hassan Hajjaj at Worcester 24 Feelers Drawing Show at BCA 28 Jules Olitski & Angus 32 McCullough at Keene State WOOD at Montserrat 35 Scott Tulay at Brattleboro 45 Bunny Harvey at Wellesley 54 Cut.Paper.Fold at 56 Concord Art Richard Heller at 60 Gallery in the Woods Gabrielle Rossmer 61 at HallSpace Robin Frisella 62 at Copley Society William R. Davis at 63 Guild of Boston Artists light | lumière | ligero 64 at Three Stones Through the Lens of History 68 at Grand Circle Head at UMass Amherst 78 Gove at Regis 80 Suzuki at UMass Lowell 81 EDITORIALS & EVENTS Welcome Statement 8 Art Basel Miami Beach 9 Centerfold: 48 Beverley Coniglio Capsule Previews: 83 David Brewster at Chase Young, Healing Fibers at the Sprinkler Factory, Call of the Ancestors at Lexicon Gallery, Rachael Eastman at Husson University Exhibits 84 Classifieds 94 Publisher KAVEH MOJTABAI Managing Editor BRIAN GOSLOW Copy Editor ANNE DALEY Mobile App & Tablet Newsstand Media ARTSCOPE DESIGN GROUP Design & Layout ARTSCOPE DESIGN GROUP Email Blast! Editor LACEY DALEY Media Development Associate VANESSA BOUCHER Account Executive GAIL NEWCOMB, MICHAEL PARKER Intern EMILY PYSCZYNKSI, SHEM TANE Writers CHRISTOPHER ARNOTT, LINDA CHESTNEY, MEREDITH CUTLER, CATHERINE CREIGHTON, ARLENE DISTLER, DONNA DODSON, JAMES DYMENT, JAMES FORITANO, FRANKLIN W. LIU, PAMELA MANDELL, J. FATIMA MARTINS, ELIZABETH MICHELMAN, LISA MIKULSKI, GREG MORELL, KRISTIN NORD, TARYN PLUMB, MARCIA SANTORE, MARGUERITE SERKIN, LAURA SHABOTT, JOHN PAUL STAPLETON, LEE STEELE, ERIC J. TAUBERT, JAMIE THOMPSON, ALEXANDRA TURSI, SUZANNE VOLMER, DON WILKINSON. CONTENTS Artscope Magazine 809-B Hancock Street (Rt 3A) Quincy, MA 02170 COVER: Brett Bigbee, Josie Over Time, 2011-15, oil on linen, 13 3/8” x 12 1/8”. Page 12 Page 62 Page 70
  8. 8. Artscope interactive IPad edition presents pan and zoom, slideshows, in-depth audio/ video, links to maps of our wanderlust reviews and more anywhere worldwide on your iPad. To subscribe search Artscope in your App Store. Welcome to artscope magazine’s final issue of 2015, an issue we’re proud to be sending to Art Basel Miami Beach, where it will be exhibited and available in the Collective Booth. Any expanded issue is a challenging enterprise for our edito- rial staff, even more so with the responsi- bility of putting New England’s visual arts communityinfrontofanationalandinter- nationalartaudienceandcollectorbase. As was the case this past June at Art Basel Switzerland, artscope will be in attendance at Miami Beach. I encourage you to download our “artscope Universe” mobile app that surveys all of our social media offerings in one place on your smartphone, iPad or reading tablet so thatyoudon’tmissapost.Youcangetitin yourAppStoreoronGooglePlay. With our attention firmly on Miami Beach, Suzanne Volmer talked to a cross- section of regional galleries, artists and collectors to find out how they prepare and what they look for in attending and presenting their work at Art Basel; her previewopensthisissue. When we started planning this issue, we set out to find artists and work we felt would bring a WOW factor, a New England equivalent of Julius von Bismarck’s “Egocentric System” — the rotating dish-like work with adjoining desk and chair its creator “rode” at Art Basel in Switzerland; you could easily have imagined Lady Gaga purchasing and using it as a concert prop. While this issue doesn’t include anything with that level of sensory overload attached, we are featuring a great collection of exhibitions, artists and newly renovated and reinvigorated museums for you to visit and explore in the coming months. While many galleries traditionallyputasidetheirsoloschedules in November and December to formulate group exhibitions to take advantage of the holiday season, thanks to the hard work of our devoted artscope staff — and a number of artists who allowed us to visit them in their studios to preview their work prior to it being transported to their respective galleries for show — we’ve been able to compile a large preview of exhibi- tionstoseebeforeyear’send. Many of the artists who were just having their first solo shows when our first issue was published in 2006 are now being showcased in museum shows, as is the case in the Fitchburg Art Museum’s “Land Ho!” exhibition — reviewed in this issuebyDonnaDodson.JamieThompson surveyed the Portland Museum of Art’s 2015 Biennial, “You Can’t Get There From Here.” The aforementioned Volmer made three trips to the Newport Art Museum inselectingherfavoritepiecesatitsannual exhibition of Art League Rhode Island, the organization founded by Nancy Gaucher-Thomas and over 40 devoted artistsin2000. J. Fatima Martins explored the recently finished renovations at the Wadsworth Atheneum and New Britain Museum of American Art, and how ongoing changes at the Worcester Art Museum will enhance the viewing experi- ence of its “Hassan Hajjaj: My Rock Stars”exhibitionthatopensNovember7. Elizabeth Michelman contributes three feature pieces: a long-overdue artist spotlight on sculptor Nora Valdez, whose work can be seen at New Bedford’s Colo Colo Gallery this November; a thorough review of “Feelers,” the Boston Center for the Arts’ 24th Drawing Show; and a look at Gabrielle Rossmer’s unique collectionofsculpturesatHallSpace. There are three shows having the benefit of time in looking back on major national and international events that are equal to any in the country. Franklin W. Liu visited Boston’s Grand Circle Gallery for its “Through the Lens of History” exhibition commemorating the 50th anniversary of the March on Selma, a show featuring still-heartbreaking images taken by James H. Barker. I had the honor of meeting multi-media artist Dawn DeDeauxatthe“Katrina Then and Now: Artists as Witness: Part II” exhibi- tion at the College of the Holy Cross, and sharing phone calls and emails with Pulitzer-Prize-winning photojournalist Lynsey Addario, whose “Veiled Rebel- lion” series of photographs of Afghan womennowonviewatMilton Academy’s Nesto Gallery is worthy of a trip, regard- lessofwhereyou’relocated. This issue’s centerfold contest winner, with a metalwork theme, is Beverley Coniglio. Thanks to our judges: Angelos Camillos, director of the Kouros Gallery and Sculpture Garden, Ridgefield, Conn.; Asia Scudder, director of the Blue Wave Art Gallery, Amesbury, Mass.; and Andrew DeVries, director of DeVries Fine Art Gallery, Lenox, Mass. For our next contest, we’re looking for your original Sci-Fi/Fantasy work; full details canbefoundinourClassifiedssection. Special appreciation must be given to Vanessa Boucher, our media development associate, and copy editor Anne Daley, for their extra ordinary efforts that have made our two extended 2015 Art Basel issuespossible. As we close another year, I’d like to thank our writers, staff, interns, adver- tisers and readers for their support over the past year. If this is your first time readingartscope,welcome.Wehopeyou’ll consider subscribing to us — whether in digital or magazine format — to continue to follow New England’s arts community. And, hint, hint, I’d like to think any art lover would love to receive a subscription to “New England’s Culture Magazine” in theirstocking. Have a safe and peaceful holiday season. Brian Goslow, Managing Editor bgoslow@artscopemagazine.com WELCOME 8 NOV/DEC 2015 Artscope staff and writers seen out and about over the past two months throughout New England; for a rundown of who’s who, visit zine.artscopemagazine.com.
  9. 9. (Editor’s note: artscope magazine is proud to have been selected to be included at this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach’s Magazines section, where we’ll be displayed amongst other leading international art magazines in its stands and collective booth. In this article, Rhode Island correspondent Suzanne Volmer provides a preview of what to expect and how some New England galleries are preparing for this year’s festivities.) Art Basel Miami Beach, sponsored by UBS and held at the Miami Beach Convention Center, is the world’s leading art destination during the first week of December with adjunct fairs, including Art Miami, CONTEXT, Aqua Art, Miami Projects, NADA, Pulse, Red Dot, Scope, Untitled and Satellite, scheduled to operate that week in the surrounding area. The adventure is in the willingness to look. Artists, curators and collec- tors consider this annual spectacle a crucial destination that informs their understanding of global direction while exposing them to new talent. It is a necessary “see and be seen” activity that combines rubber-necking with a buying spree. Combating over-satura- tion while enjoying the experience is part of the game. As a full-blown happening, the landscape will be rich with “something for everybody” and a source of civic pride that fully embraces seeing, shopping and the party phenomenon. The fairs are an opportunity to look at modern and contemporary art as a conversation heard around the globe. As a bonus, the public is also invited to see some of the Miami area’s most notable private collections, including the Margulies Collection, Rubell Family Collection and the Cisneros Fontanals Foundation Collection. George Kinghorn, executive director and curator of the University of Maine Museum of Art — and previously the director and curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville — is a 12-year veteran of the Miami Beach Art Fairs. He spends a week at the Fair, a period he considers necessary to see all the locations exhibiting citywide. Kinghorn starts with a quick look at Art Basel Miami Beach and later returns for Art Basel Miami Beach 2014 (© Art Basel Miami Beach). closer inspection. His assistant follows closely behind him to take notes, freeing Kinghorn’s attention to view art unfettered and to speak with galler- ists and colleagues. Kingman feels that socializing is an important aspect of attending. Over the past decade, he has witnessed the scene develop to include many fair options. Beyond reconnaissance, this is a think tank environment for Kinghorn and a point of purchase situation regarding his institutional collecting. He spoke of his satisfaction in identifying talent early. A 2007 purchase of Nick Cave’s FEATURED FAIR: ART BASEL PREVIEW HEADING SOUTH TO SEE AND BE SEEN ARTSCOPE AND NEW ENGLAND ARTISTS PREPARE FOR ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 1901 CONVENTION CENTER DRIVE MIAMI BEACH, FLORIDA DECEMBER 3 THROUGH 6 NOV/DEC 2015 9
  10. 10. work from Jack Shainman Gallery at Art Basel Miami Beach for MOCA Jacksonville has since appreciated about three times its original purchase price. Purchases that Kingman makes tend to develop into exhibitions, as is the case with a painting by Jack Balas that he bought at Miami Projects from the Denver-based Robischon Gallery. This purchase will evolve into a 2017 solo show at the University of Maine Museum of Art. The sectors included in Art Basel Miami Beach are Galleries, Nova, Positions, Edition, Kabinett, Survey, Public, Film and Magazines (which will include artscope magazine, following our participation earlier in the year at Art Basel Switzerland). In the gallery area, prestige galleries like Gagosian, with myriad locations worldwide, will share attention with individual galleries of merit that have been vetted for their commitment to represent art that fits into a schematic of international importance. Getting juried into the main fair is rigorous, but it’s an attractive carrot for those who try. Boston’s Samsøn Gallery applied for this arena, but was wait-listed. Director Camilo Alvarez explained he also applied for NADA and was declined. He said he “won’t be doing Untitled as in past years, and probably will just go and walk with clients.” Often galleries aiming to move from one tier to another, after participating for a few years at one level, take a year off and return with freshness. CHOOSING THEIR SPOT Mike Carroll, owner and director of the Schoolhouse Gallery in Provinc- etown, didn’t apply for the main fair. “I think the artwork I represent matches well with the satellite fairs which are better suited to reach our viewers and clients,” he said. He’ll have a booth at Scope, which he said was “extremely successful” last year and whose curatorial arc and devel- oping presence he’s been following. “People spoke enthusiastically of its beauty and the strength of the work that was exhibited.” Carroll will be showcasing the work of two Cuban artists, Adrián Fernández Milanés and Alex Miguel Hernández Dueñas. “We think that Scope will be a great opportunity for a wider public to know more about their work and practices,” he said. “The preparations are interesting because of the logistics of the studios being in one place and the fair and gallery in another. We met recently for a week in south Florida to choose work and make production arrangements.” While Milanés and Hernández Dueñas are his main focus in Miami Art Basel Miami Beach Preview WOOD Montserrat College of Art Gallery Through Dec. 5, 2015 Featuring: Damien Hoar de Galvan, Damion Silver, Sally Tittmann, Harry Roseman, Michael Zelehoski An exhibition of five contemporary artists whos work explores the materiality of wood. Senior Thesis Exhibition Shows 301 Gallery Nov. 16 – Nov. 20 Nov. 30 – Dec. 4 Michael Zelehoski, Knot (detail), 2014. Repurposed wood and painted plywood. Image courtesy of Mike Weiss Gallery 23 Essex Street | Beverly, MA montserrat.edu/galleries Thlayo Rocha Pitta, Ocena/Atlas, 2014, Galeria Millan (Courtesy of the artist and gallery). Chris Haub, Float for Pete Seeger, Miller Yezerski Gallery. 10 NOV/DEC 2015
  11. 11. Newport Art MuseuM FALL Exhibitions 76 Bellevue Ave. Newport, RI newportartmuseum.org Open: Tues.-Sat. 10-4pm Sun. 12-4pm Also on view this fAll REviving DuRR FREEDLEy: nEwpoRt’s FoRgottEn ARtist september 26, 2015 – January 18, 2016 photogRAphERs guiLD MEMbERs’ Exhibition september 26, 2015 – January 17, 2016 opEning REcEption: Friday, september 25, 2015 5 – 7 pm David Kendrick, Tsunami Crush photomontage, archival digital print, no. 1 of 5; 25 x 19 in. Ken steinkamp, Between Then and Now Mixed media; 60 x 46 in. elizabeth Duffy / Brian Miller Key Chandelier, (detail) 2007 brass and keys. Art League of Rhode island Members’ Exhibition september 5, 2015 – January 3, 2016 Elizabeth Duffy & brian Miller: A series of Minor Miracles september 5, 2015 -January 10, 2016 Beach, he will also be looking for placements for the rest of his roster. “We are always trying to be a lens and a doorway to the studios of all of our artists,” Carroll said. EDITED EXCELLENCE Throughout Art Basel Miami Beach, and echoed in the other fairs, is the feeling of edited excellence. A collector in many ways functions as cultural steward of contemporary art encouraged to understand the significance of purchases, at times balancing consideration of a previous buy against a present instinct. Vetting is quite influential across the board. It is inter- esting to note that Miami-area collectors have considerable influence in their own right in shaping the conceptual direction of the smaller fairs. This influence gives the smaller fairs greater definition. The thrill of discoveries beyond one’s region can be a refreshing perk — seeing the unexpected can be profound, even fun. Globalism has always been a defining force in shaping Art Basel Miami Beach, and art from nearly all continents is represented. In the midst of Miami’s visual plethora, one sometimes gets the feeling that The Emperor Has No Clothes; however, sifting through it all is where the challenge of connoisseurship enters. Vanphouthon Souvannasane, co-owner of Providence’s Yellow Peril Gallery, spoke recently about their choice to participate in Satellite, which is a pop-up mini-fair that is expected to take over a hotel for the duration of the week with a selection of solo shows. A climate of excess infests Miami Art Week, and tying into that sense of spectacle will be Yellow Peril’s solo artist offering at Satellite. Jennifer Avery’s fetishistic “The Beast Boutique” is an immersive installation crafted from Hermès fabrics enriched by her recent residency in France with the luxury goods company. NOV/DEC 2015 11 Boston’s Miller Yezerski Gallery will be a participant in the Pulse Fair. Howard Yezerski describes its involvement as an advertising expense for the gallery, while business partner Ellen Miller spoke of their curatorial decision to take three artists from their roster to Miami. This decision will allow their booth’s presence to have a focused visual profile. Included will be artwork by Heather Gill, Brian Zink and Christian Haub, each of whom uses types of transparent acrylic or Plexiglas to create colorful wall reliefs that read as paintings. Adelson Gallery of Boston and New York will participate in Miami Projects with one artist, Federico Uribe, whose work in this case also reads as wall relief. The gallery expects to bring portraits made from piano keys by the artist to Miami Beach. In the Adelson booth at BARCU in Bogotá, Columbia, Uribe’s work received critical praise this past October for his bullet constructs, for which there is a high demand and low inventory. Joanne Mattera, a New York artist with New England ties (she has a studio in Salem, Mass. and is the founder of the International Encaustic Conference), expects to show new paintings from her “Silk Road” series with Miami’s Projects Gallery at Aqua Art. Mattera has blogged about the Miami Fair experience for seven years. She has a sophisticated and refined perspective, and her explorations on the subject are deeply rooted in the practice of informing herself as an artist to support her evolving direction. In addition to Art Basel Miami Beach, many collectors often gravitate to only their favorite sites among the smaller art fairs as a way of editing the art they will see. The synergy of the high and low, the socially conscious and the historically significant that flows into many creative statements is a good reason to visit Miami Beach during the first week of December. | Suzanne Volmer
  12. 12. 12 NOV/DEC 2015 As a clearinghouse, the mission of Art League Rhode Island (ALRI) “is to provide a venue for the growth and encouragement of artists, to promote high standards in the visual arts, and to encourage community participation and appreciation of the greater Rhode Island arts community.” Among their stated objectives is to sponsor an annual exhibition of Rhode Island artists. This year’s “Art League Rhode Island Member’s Exhibition,” on view at Newport Art Museum’s first floor hallway and main Ilgenfritz Gallery Audrey Monahan, Fog Over Quicksand Pond, Little Compton, photograph, 47.5” x 27.3”. NEWPORT ART MUSEUM 76 BELLEVUE AVENUE NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND THROUGH JANUARY 3 TEAM PLAYERS ART LEAGUE RHODE ISLAND MEMBERS’ EXHIBITION through January 3, highlights works by mid- and late-career artists. Newport Art Museum curator Nancy Grinnell strengthened the connec- tivity of the 75 artworks in the show by installing the offerings as well- considered visual groupings. By clustering related artworks, Grinnell has managed to make some very compelling interludes of information. The interludes anchor individual selections and create more impactful viewing for museum audiences. The curator’s approach focuses what is essentially a big show of diverse content into an organization of correspondences, which gives audiences the depth of a thought-provoking exhibit. She presents us with a sense of pruned abundance, which reveals the character and quality of the art. Among the strong groupings, and the most individually powerful artwork on view, is Wanda Perkowska Coderre’s abstract watercolor “Nature’s Gift.” This painting is installed above Dora Atwater Millikin’s also impressive representa- tional oil painting, “Steel.” Reviews EXHIBITS, ARTISTS AND PERFORMANCES ACROSS NEW ENGLAND & BEYOND
  13. 13. The horizontal sight line on an adjacent wall begins with the luxuriant and moody mixed-media “Beach with River” painting by Libby Manchester Gilpatric that is bookended by Uli Brahmst’s “Screen #0416141517,” an abstract synthetic polymer on canvas. The works of Brahmst and Gilpatric are well executed, and Grinnell has used them to balance wall space with equal weight while emphasizing content in the artworks that are hung between them. Audrey Monahan’s “Fog Over Quicksand Pond” is a photograph showing sharply defined reddish-brown reeds in the immediate foreground against a background dissolve of white, obliterating and mysterious fog. Also worth seeing is Eric Hovermale’s “Mixed Emotions,” a digital photographic print of a nude female with elegant calligraphy imbedded into the image frame that can be seen floating as a layer over the entire nude. The rippled text reads as a horizontal linear element that runs edge to edge on the vertically oriented printed field. The cursive lettering in Hovermale’s artwork is comparative to the painterly detail in Brahmst’s work — one of many nice subtleties in this show. Saberah Malik contributes a miniature totemic figure made of light- weight fabrics that conveys a contemporary sensibility while relating to ancient multi-cultural influences. Both Hovermale’s digital photo- graphic print and Reenie Barrow’s “Easter Island Rano Raraku,” a sepia-toned photograph, comple- ment Malick’s aesthetic while relating to what are essentially comparisons of iconic subject matter. Marjorie Hellman’s experimental tonal print on aluminum “MJQA3” reflects recent technical experimen- tation by the artist. Curator Grinnell has hung Hellman’s work to create a dialogue with the restrained physi- cality of Arlene McGonagle’s three- dimensional “Basket/Tapestry 2.” While best known for her paintings, Hellman recently discussed the sublimated printing techniques on aluminum, which she explores with this work, that offered her the opportunity to bring her painterly vocabulary of geometric abstrac- tion onto a larger scale. Libby Gilpatric, Beach, oil, cold wax, oil stick, powdered pigment, ground pastel, charcoal and graphite dust, sand, 36” x 48”. BY CLUSTERING RELATED ARTWORKS, GRINNELL HAS MANAGED TO MAKE SOME VERY COMPELLING INTERLUDES OF INFORMATION. THE INTERLUDES ANCHOR INDIVIDUAL SELECTIONS AND CREATE MORE IMPACTFUL VIEWING FOR MUSEUM AUDIENCES. Eric Hovermale, Mixed Emotions, photograph, 24” x 96”. NOV/DEC 2015 13
  14. 14. IMMERSED IN TRADITION This year’s ALRI show chiefly explores traditional techniques and the artists included enjoy process immersion. Coderre and Milikin’s paintings examine the darkness. Gilpatric and Brahmst’s works mine a sensuality of shifting spatial awareness. The aesthetics of Hellman and McGonagle gravitate toward balanced structural reasoning against subdued color choices while Richard Harrington (2D), Nancy Nielsen (2D) and Cynthia Whalen Nelson (3D) exhibit art that is overtly color-charged. In this show, Harrington’s painting vividly glows from within, carrying influences of Hans Hoffmann in its execution. The sensi- bility of Nelson’s sexualized sarcophagus, which makes a jarring corner statement, is informed by influences of Frida Kahlo and Judy Chicago. Concurrently with the “Members Exhibition” at Newport Art Museum, the Art League of Rhode Island is sponsoring “Tangible Thinking,” a STEM-to-STEAM technology-based exhibition that was curated by Amy Leidtke and is on view at THE VETS Gallery in Providence through January 3. The large-scale sculptural works of Stephen Metcalf that were originally scheduled to appear in front of the Providence venue can instead be seen occupying the Newport Art Museum grounds — a last-minute site change. These fit into the context of the insti- tution’s landscaped property, which includes other outside sculp- tures on loan. | Suzanne Volmer Reviews fullerCRAFT museumTM Let the art touch you fullerCRAFT museumTM Let the art touch you Grethe Wittrock: Nordic Currents Fuller Craft Museum, September 12, 2015 – January 31, 2016 Opening Reception, Saturday, September 12, 2:00 pm, 3:00 pm artist lecture Reception is included with the cost of admission. Lecture $7 ($15 Nonmembers) Sarah Perkins, Seeded Container, 2003. Enamel on copper, silver. Photo credit: Jairo Ramirez Fuller Craft Museum ■ Brockton, MA 02301 ■ 508.588.6000 ■ www.fullercraft.org Hours: Tues – Sun 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Th 5:00 – 9:00 pm Grethe Wittrock, European Magpie (detail), 2015. 14 NOV/DEC 2015 Uli Brahmst, Screen #0416141517, synthetic polymer on canvas, 50” x 40”.
  15. 15. NOV/DEC 2015 15 FITCHBURG ART MUSEUM 185 ELM STREET FITCHBURG, MASSACHUSETTS THROUGH JANUARY 10 “Land Ho!,” the impressive new show at the Fitchburg Art Museum (FAM), is a must-see. Mary M. Tinti’s sixth curatorial project is the result of nearly one year of extensive research on FAM’s permanent collection utilizing her keen eye for contempo- rary New England art. Koch Curato- rial Fellow Emily M. Mazzola, whose knowledge of 19th and 20th century American Art brought to light the personal stories behind many of the treasures that FAM owned, assisted Tinti. The results are surprising and wide sweeping, pulling into focus the evolution of landscape painting, mark-making and myriad contempo- rary approaches to this genre. The exhibition is installed in nearly all of the newly renovated galleries on the second floor and bridge of the museum. Nick Capasso joined FAM nearly three years ago, and with his appointment as director came some bold changes. Every single gallery has been renovated except for one, and going forward every rotating exhibit will be devoted to contemporary art. ON A MISSION “New England artists feel under- served by their local art institutions who have turned their sights to national and international artists,” Capasso said. Therefore, his mission is to feature them at FAM. “Land Ho!” is the second in an ongoing series of exhibitions pairing contempo- rary artists in conversation with the artwork in their collection (the first featured the still life genre two years ago, and a forthcoming show will focus on portraiture). If the Fitchburg Art Museum had mounted a show of landscape paint- ings, drawn solely from its permanent collection, there would be obvious gaps. By hanging historical works in dialogue with works by contemporary artists, Tinti creates a conversation of art-historical importance. Images by Charles Burchfield, Edward Hopper, Charles Sheeler and Rockwell Kent Sue McNally, Maroon Bells, Colorado (from the series This Land Is My Land), 2014, oil on canvas, 90” x 114”. LAND HO! FITCHBURG PAIRS HISTORICAL WITH CONTEMPORARY are hung together, the show’s press release noted, “in a magnificently interspersed, intergenerational, multi- scaled mash-up of landscapes old and new, iconic and fantastic, universal and personal.” At the entrance, one is greeted by Yvonne Twining Humber’s majestic canvas “Haying.” Humber’s approach to landscape was fueled by necessity. Reviews
  16. 16. She painted during the Depression for the WPA’s Federal Arts Project, and since she could not afford a studio, she worked outdoors. The exhibit features 30 modest- scale canvases from FAM’s perma- nent collection alongside artwork ranging from the intimate to the monumental by eight contemporary New England artists: Carrie Crane, Sally Curcio, Leila Daw, Warner Friedman, Michele Lauriat, Sandy Litchfield, Shona Macdonald and Sue McNally. Placing these artists in the canon of art history allows us to see the evolution from descriptive, representational landscape styles to political, conceptual and imaginative renderings by a generation of artists whose influences differ greatly from their predecessors. If landscape by definition evokes, “An expanse of scenery that can be seen in a single view” (thefreedic- tionary.com), then this show is sure to expand one’s definition to include a multiplicity of approaches to the subject. The exhibit is punctuated by such brilliant pairings as Sally Curcio’s “Metropolis,” with a memory landscape from the Luba people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. These historic “lukasa” are made of wood and beads, serving as a blueprint of royal family compounds. Another such juxtaposition is Sandy Litchfield’s “Turn Around Town” and Rockwell Kent’s “Monadnock After- noon.” Such pairings and salon-style groupings underscore the seren- dipitous connections between one generation and another — literally worlds apart. Leila Daw’s “Calling the Earth to Witness” is majestic, not only in the beading technique that she learned in an artist residency in Myanmar, but in its deeply profound message that we share the same water the world over. In a similar vein, Sue McNally takes an iconic approach to landscapes in her “This Land is My Land” series, where she represents each of the 50 states in a single canvas. Artists such as Carrie Crane expand our notion of landscapes to include map-making; her layered pieces remind us of topographical hiking maps. Warner Friedman’s architectur- ally influenced paintings are crafted into bent and shaped canvases that evoke sight lines. His works blur the line between interior and exterior landscapes. Likewise, Michele Lauriat’s work observes the organic shapes of the landscape as they interact with the geometric shapes of the built environment. Perhaps the most quirky of all are Shona Macdon- BY HANGING HISTORICAL WORKS IN DIALOGUE WITH WORKS BY CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS, TINTI CREATES A CONVERSATION OF ART-HISTORICAL IMPORTANCE. LEFT: Michele Lauriat, Untitled from the series Beyond/Return, 2014, mixed media on paper, 65” x 55”. RIGHT: “Land Ho!” installation view (courtesy of Charles Photographics). 16 NOV/DEC 2015 Reviews
  17. 17. NOV/DEC 2015 17 ald’s landscape scenes with familiar interruptions of traffic cones, driveway reflectors and dig safe flags. I came to several conclusions after seeing this show. With the advent of photography, the realistic landscape paintings of one era gave way to a more subjective approach, resulting in quirky, enigmatic abstractions referring to place. One wonders if anyone would even categorize these contemporary artists as landscape artists if it were not for the context of this show. As a case in point, Sally Curcio builds landscapes of both real and imaginary places such as Miami Beach and the Sherwood Forest using small beads. In addition, she creates large-scale photographs of these intimate scenes that translate the literal renderings of the landscapes into visual textures and colorful patterns. Hers are the only sculptures and photographs in the show, and both media add depth and dimension to the presentation and pacing of the exhibi- tion rooms. “Land Ho!” was the sailors’ cry in announcing the sight of land. Yet, in this context, I think it calls attention to a new era for the Fitchburg Art Museum and its exciting approach to curating and exhibiting its permanent collection in connection with contempo- rary artists from New England. | Donna Dodson Carrie Crane, Braided Stream Non-Conformity, 2010, acrylic on Lexan, 12” x 36”.
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  19. 19. PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART 7 CONGRESS STREET PORTLAND, MAINE THROUGH JANUARY 3 You can’t get there from here. This timeworn Maine saying has become a kind of cultural touchstone for the state, like blueberries or lobster. But Alison Ferris, curator of the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, found a decidedly more artistic application for the adage. Ferris, who curated “You Can’t Get There From Here: The 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial,” was inspired by how the saying seems to sum up the indirect, challenging and at times frustrating creative process. Visual artists often follow winding routes to go from inspiration to final product, guided by a combination of creativity and craft. The 32 artists in this year’s Biennial — the museum’s ninth — represent established and emerging talent in contemporary art with strong connections to Maine. This is the first year that the museum has conducted the Biennial purely through invitation. The result is a compre- hensive exhibition that is also focused. There is a wide range of styles and techniques on display, but all relate to Ferris’ initial inspiration; these artists demonstrate the importance of the creative process, however circuitous it may be. Upon entering the exhibition, viewers are met with the intense gaze of Josie, the subject of Brett Bigbee’s painting, “Josie Over Time.” Her direct stare is startlingly life-like, as are her porcelain skin and plump lips. A dark, moody sky and rough sea stand in contrast to Josie’s luminescence. Bigbee’s mysterious piece sets the tone for YOU CAN’T GET THERE FROM HERE: THE 2015 PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART BIENNIAL Stacy Howe, Profane Maine, 2015, ink, charcoal, acrylic and graphite on paper, 48” x 60”. 20 NOV/DEC 2015 COVER STORY
  20. 20. the exhibition, piquing viewers’ curiosity about the dispa- rate works on display. They’re also greeted by variety of baskets made by Native American artists who demonstrate the perfect blend of process and panache. Jeremy Frey, a Wabanaki artist, is especially noted for his combination of tradi- tion and innovation. He makes his own wooden forms to achieve contemporary shapes for his baskets, which are woven from time-honored materials. His 2013 “Basket” has an exquisite urn shape, with an asymmetrical collar around the top. The contrasting dark and light tones add to the piece’s striking modernity. TRADITION GOES GREEN Theresa Secord, another Wabanaki artist, adheres closely to tradition by using antique wooden forms. A popular traditional shape, the acorn, is crafted from ash, sweetgrass and cedar in Secord’s graceful “Acorn Basket.” The warm tones of the cedar contrast beautifully with the pale greens of the sweetgrass. Brown ash is typically an essential material for Wabanaki basket makers, as it is a pivotal symbol within the tribe’s creation story. But as brown ash is endangered, Secord has begun using cedar for her baskets. Her ingenuity speaks to the importance of resiliency in the face of adversity. George Neptune, a Passamaquoddy artist, creates baskets that break from tradition in fanciful style. His “Wedding Cake” is embellished with bands of bright color and natural branches, sprouting diminutive flowers and housing tiny birds. Neptune’s attention to detail, delicate craftsmanship and stunning creativity are extraordinary. In contrast to the elegance of the baskets, much of the work in the Biennial is unapologetically big and bold. Meghan Brady’s colorful abstract oils, featuring huge brushstrokes and vaguely geometric shapes, complement Richard Van Buren’s madcap sculptures. Made of clear Meghan Brady, Spring Moon Dog, 2015, oil on canvas, 51” x 42”. NOV/DEC 2015 21 Brett Bigbee, Josie Over Time, 2011-15, oil on linen, 13 3/8” x 12 1/8”. Sarah Sockbeson, Basket, 2011, brown ash, sweetgrass and antler, 4” x 3 1/2” (Hudson Museum, University of Maine).
  21. 21. casting polyester resin tinted with bubblegum-hued pigments, his sculptures are bizarre and enchanting. Suspended within the resin are myriad objects, such as plastic pearls, rhinestones, feathers, tiny seashells and glitter. They feel like physical manifestations of an artist’s creative mind, with explosions of color and texture. John Bisbee’s tornado-shaped “Hearsay” is a massive sculpture of metal spikes curved into a swirling vortex. It is a marvel that Bisbee is able to coax organic, undulating forms out of tough, unforgiving materials. Featuring similarly clever use of material is “To Mend: #3” by George Mason. At first glance, the piece looks like a quilt of layered rectangles of fabric; it then takes on the appear- ance of metal as one gets a closer look. Mason’s deft handling of a variety of media — plaster, burlap, casein paint and encaustic — results in a work subdued in color but rich with texture and dimen- sion. Dominating the atrium space within the exhibition gallery is Anna Hepler’s “Reveille,” a gigantic hanging sculpture of steel wire woven around a metal armature. Although light and airy in appear- ance, “Reveille,” is a work painstakingly crafted through a process that Hepler likens to “drawing in space.” Stacy Howe’s drawings are two-dimensional, but no less impres- sive. Her ink, charcoal, acrylic and graphite drawings look like surreal collages of seemingly random objects. For example, “Shark Cover Story 22 NOV/DEC 2015 Fuselage of Antiques and Memorabilia” features four sharks swimming through an assortment of antique chairs, bent cutlery, jewelry and even a ceiling fan. Tapping into her subconscious, using a surrealist process known as automatism, Howe gives form to the intricacies of the imagination. “Dreaming of Possibilities” by Owen F. Smith is an interactive new media installation that also aims to capture the creative spark. Four LCD monitors playing four different films are suspended from the ceiling and positioned above mats on the floor. Viewers are meant to lie on their backs to watch the films, mimicking Wilson’s own experience of creating them. He laid on his back in the grass, and filmed the sky as he contemplated clouds passing by and birds in flight. Letting his mind wander, he stopped the film at the exact moment when inspiration struck. Viewers are thus able to contemplate Wilson’s thought process, dreaming up their own possibilities for what exciting ideas may have leapt into Wilson’s mind. It is a fascinating and unusually intimate experience to feel connected to the artist’s creative process. This gets at the heart of what “You Can’t Get There From Here” is all about: the strange and beautiful alchemy of making art. | Jamie Thompson
  22. 22. HASSAN HAJJAJ’S ROCK STARS ROCKIN’ THE CASBAH AND BEYOND With great rhythm and swanky style, photographer-filmmaker- designer Hassan Hajjaj brings his inclusive visual language to the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) this November. His bombastic site-specific exhibition, “My Rock Stars,” is a music video installation presented in dialogue with photographic portraits of featured musicians and performers. Full disclosure: While I did listen to Reviews examples of Gnawa (a beautiful tradi- tional North African musical style rooted in the history of slavery and featured in the installation) in order to deconstruct Hajjaj’s art for this review, I couldn’t stop thinking about “Rock the Casbah” by The Clash (1982), which to me seemed to fit the subversiveness of the exhibition: “But the Bedouin they brought out the electric camel drum, The local guitar picker got his guitar-picking thumb, As soon as the Shareef had cleared the square, They began to wail…” Hajjaj’s style, grounded in the practice of community collabora- tion, is a European-African-Arabic blend referencing deep transnational ancestral cultural traditions and history. His installation spotlights the power of performance and musical theatre as a form of free commu- nication and commodity. Because he transforms the mundane and unknown into celebrity, he is consid- ered the “Andy Warhol of Marrakech.” Video and photographs are displayed within a unique room designed by the artist to be an immersive environment achieving the dynamic aesthetics (layers of bold color, shapes, pattern and sound) of an international bazaar, recreating the interior space of a Moroccan souq. The walls of Hajjaj’s 24 NOV/DEC 2015 WORCESTER ART MUSEUM 55 SALISBURY STREET WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS NOVEMBER 7 THROUGH MARCH 6 VIDEO AND PHOTOGRAPHS ARE DISPLAYED WITHIN A UNIQUE ROOM DESIGNED BY THE ARTIST TO BE AN IMMERSIVE ENVIRONMENT ACHIEVING THE DYNAMIC AESTHETICS . . . OF AN INTERNATIONAL BAZAAR Helen, the Venus Bushfire, 2011, metallic lambda print on 3mm white dibond, 53 1/2” x 39 5/8” (Courtesy of the artist and Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York).
  23. 23. 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | Open Daily | 860.435.3663 | hotchkiss.org/arts field kallop November 7 - December 13, 2015 receptioN aND performaNce: November 7, 4 - 6 p.m. the melody of structures room are wallpapered in motif patterns derived from the shapes of common goods, and a special display area was constructed to hold grocery store items. The creation of this kitschy-pop environment was done in collaboration with WAM’s curatorial, education and public engagement staff, who went shopping at local international markets in Worcester to gather the necessary materials. KEEPING IT REAL The exhibition’s focus is Hajjaj’s 2012 video “My Rock Stars Experimental, Volume I,” featuring nine separately filmed musical performances. His “rock stars” are real musicians and performers whom the artist befriended and later staged their fame within a music video setup. Hajjaj designed the clothing as well as the backdrops. He also made high-fashion portraits of the nine performers, as is commonly done in the music industry. The photo- graphs are mounted in handcrafted frames made from various recycled objects. The use of cast-off items highlights the vast amounts of disposable trash-stuff available globally as design material. Hajjaj’s style rejects a utopian minimalist ideal for a maximalist reality, and initiates a question: Can we find and do we want silence within all this visual and musical layering? The look also evokes periods in recent history when North Africa was extremely fashionable (think about the glamour associated with Yves Saint Laurent, the Rolling Stones and Paul and Talitha Getty in Marrakech and Tangier). WAM is hosting Hajjaj because his content connects to interests within the community as well as the museum’s international collection. Worcester is an economically diverse immigrant city with a manufacturing tradition. The expanding global population has roots not only in Europe and Latin America, but also in Africa and Asia. These communities have and are trans- forming the look and feel of the city. Second, Hajjaj continues a very rich tradition of specific African portrait- photography. An excellent example for comparison is the work of the master African portraitist Seydou Keïta (1921-2001). Hajjaj also honors the importance of African and Arabic traditional print and textile design, weaving and fabric making. Textile patterns can communicate political and religious ideas and hold important cultural significance related to identity and place. For comparison, visitors should examine the photographs of Aleppo, Syria by photojournalist Franco Pagetti. The images in “Veiled Aleppo” (in WAM’s Hiatt Gallery until February 28, 2016) capture the structure of hanging domestic sheets outdoors during wartime. The dirty and torn home textiles show us that civil war is family violence. Connections can be also made to the geometric painting of Worcester artist Terri Priest, presented in the museum’s Art Since the Mid-20th Century Gallery. “Static Variations: Blue x 2” (a recent acquisition on view until December 13) is painted in a deep cobalt color with alternating brown and white stripes, prevalent designs in global art. Priest was a civil rights activist and her work is imbued with sophisticated messages about gender and racial equality. Hajjaj, Pagetti and Priest are communicating different aspects of the same world story: cultures mix and cultures clash (“Shareef don’t like it, Rock the casbah.”) Finally, for art theory purists: Hajjaj exemplifies the newest category and contentious art definition — the metamodern. What his work represents is the rise of contemporary non-European culture as economic and cultural force in the time of complicated technology, rapid globalization and the Mr. James, 2009, metallic lambda print on 3mm white dibond, 53 1/2” x 39 5/8” (Courtesy of the artist and Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York). NOV/DEC 2015 25
  24. 24. Reviews 26 NOV/DEC 2015 New Art Center in Newton 617.964.3424 www.NewArtCenter.org 61 Washington Park, Newton, MA CONNECT WITH ART CREATE ART • LEARN ABOUT ART • VIEW ART CALL FOR CURATORIAL PROPOSALS: DEADLINE: JANUARY 25, 2016 The Curatorial Opportunity Program is now accepting proposals for contemporary art exhibitions. Learn more and apply at www.newartcenter.org/COP ON VIEW NOVEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 19 Decoys And Devices, curated by Liz Blum CONCURRENTLY: Line Up: Janes Cusano, Julie Fox, Margaret Scoppa, and Ina Zilber Register Now for Winter Classes & Workshops! Boubacar Kafando, 2010, metallic lambda print on 3mm white dibond, 53 1/2” x 39 5/8” (Courtesy of the artist and Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York). wealth-gap. The static between rich and poor is visible by the lust for fame and luxe design trends, promoted via media, versus the acces- sible everyday street styles embraced by everyone. Hajjaj makes visible economic reality: out of necessity, we are transforming our cheap goods into luxurious fashionable items. We are living in the era of DIY. In a joyful and fun way, Hajjaj engages us in a serious ongoing conver- sation about migration, democratic cultural exchange, and shifts in language and ideas while he initiates questions about the experience of interacting with overwhelming consumerism. He’s teaching us, through immersion and friendship, how we can recycle materials, how we should reframe our language about people, and how to blend visual and musical styles. We’ve experienced these ideas before in a different format: consider the American Jean-Michel Basquiat, and how his art explored dichotomies of wealth versus poverty in urban America. “Hassan Hajjaj: My Rock Stars” is only one of the many participatory exhibitions at WAM. This exhibition represents a shift in method and attitude that has taken years for the museum to implement success- fully. After a period of foggy focus, programming has started to make its “unique narrative” clear to visitors. On November 14, during WAM’s Community Day, which will have a Global Art and Music theme, Hajjaj will be at the museum to make portrait-photographs of visitors while they are engaged in dance and movement within staged areas decorated with his uniquely designed, Afro-Arabic textile patterns and furniture. | J. Fatima Martins Assisting collectors, both seasoned and emerging, in search of beautiful and compelling works of fine contemporary art. MillerWhiteFineArts.com Garden Court, 708 Route 134, South Dennis, MA 508.360.4302 Open Year-Round by Appointment William Hemmerdinger, Bardez, 48 x 116” Howard Barnes, Eye of the Butterfly, 36 x 108”
  25. 25. LEAVING OUR MARK In Celebration of the Pencil 2 0 1 5 P R E M I E R S P O N S O R 21 Edwards Street, Springfield, MA 01103 • 800.625.7738 • springfieldmuseums.org • NOVEMBER 24-MARCH 27 Sixty-two works on paper by artists renowned for their contemporary and representational drawings. Featured artists include Lesley Cohen, Lisa Henry, Ryan Jacque, Elizabeth Kostojohn, Christina Mastrangelo, Scott Tulay, and Steve Wilda (Massachusetts), along with Paul Batch, Doug Gillette, Luciana Heineman, Bill Simpson, and Alan Spellman (Connecticut) and Terry Miller (Maryland). The exhibit also includes works by Jennifer Maestre and Dalton Ghetti, who both use pencils to create imaginative and intricate contemporary sculptures. Media Sponsor Dalton Ghetti, Hanging Heart, 1994, photo by Sloan Howard, DTHPhotography; Lisa M. Henry, Rhythm and Strings, 2011; Lesley Cohen, Where Do We Go From Here?, 2009. Media Partner Organized by Western Massachusetts artist Steve Wilda.
  26. 26. 28 MAR/APR 2015 MILLS GALLERY BOSTON CENTER FOR THE ARTS 539 TREMONT STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS THROUGH DECEMBER 20 Erika Baglyas, Meaning of Safety, 2015, indigo drawing, ink on paper, 19” x 24”. Flat, Flatter, Flattest. “Feelers,” the Boston Center for the Arts’ 24th Drawing Show at the Mills Gallery, is a biennial juried selection of 60 works from 56 artists hailing from as close as the Boston area to as far away as Iceland. Visiting curator Susan Metrican, director of the arts at Brandeis University, sought to capture a “certain something” about contem- porary drawing practice through associations to Edwin A. Abbott’s romance “Flatland,” a dystopia of a two-dimensional world. The flat inhabitants of this plane can only know others by reaching outside their own perimeters to “feel” them. Feeling, however interpreted, may be an essential component of all forms of art. But Metrican’s exploration of the term seeks to pinpoint how some “drawings” heighten our awareness of what qualifies as “flat.” Risking a painterly touch, Metrican has grouped works in different areas according to their color. In one alcove, glowing yellow, beige and ochre tones successfully draw together unlike forms. But the device may work too well. It distracts atten- tion from the internal coherence of individual works and the more subtle ways in which many of them connect. Uniform color planes affect our perceptions of flatness and depth. The first piece in the show, which may be better appreciated when leaving, is Liz Nofziger’s “Ground Lock,” cutouts of transparent orange vinyl covering the gallery’s front windows. The filter separates the “dimension” of the art gallery from the street. It puts a frame around movement in the outer world, and it emotionally distances the viewer by canceling out nature’s expected hues. Also in the same room, testifying to the immateriality of the perceptual plane, is a curious drawing by Jenene Nagy. “P5’s” burnished expanse of graphite marks appears to float above the paper at least an inch off the wall. Around the corner, in prickly contrast, hangs Heather Clark’s grass-green wall relief, “Catoctin Mountain.” An eight-foot-tall isometric map stitched together from layers of AstroTurf, it clearly qualifies as a “feeler.” Tickling is a metaphor and a feeling, too. In her installation “Evolving Coasts,” Carly Glovinski invites us to seat ourselves on a folding beach chair with a pretend book bearing a painted landscape on its cover. The bubbly, bilious green face with orange piercing in Zachary Herrmann’s foam sculpture, “Portrait 3,” could almost be a putrid slice of ham. But in the reverse side’s ethereal strokes and fluorescent globs, one begins to suspect a more complex personality. Several works reinforce sensa- tions of flatness while reflecting the Reviews PUTTING OUT FEELERS BCA’S 24TH DRAWING SHOW 28 NOV/DEC 2015
  27. 27. viewer’s vertical stance. Wall-huggers include Samantha Fields’ hanging of woven cloth and drooping skeins (“Of Two Minds”), and Rachel Frank’s “Protective Cape,” an outsized Native American medicine bag, beaded and tufted. Brian Christopher Glaser’s “Veronica,” a drift of sheer polyester voile imprinted with glowing tresses from shampoo ads, drapes voluptuously onto the floor. Sculptor Jill Slosburg-Ackerman makes a small space mysterious in her segmented wooden “Constructed Drawing.” Vertical and horizontal sticks chase each other around the periphery of this wall-mounted cube, which bears some resemblance to a bellows camera turned inside out. A blotchy lavender panel in front may hint at an exposed photographic plate. Time is charged with dimensionality in Gary Setzer’s video “Horizon Pull,” in which a crouching man retreats endlessly from the camera while scooping a line in the sand with his hand. In her projected video “Collage,” aligned with a corner wall, Rebecca Newhouse shifts the viewer’s attention from a sense of narrative to abstraction. The viewer follows in fascination a pair of choreo- graphed hands waving, swimming and cradling each other, but with time refocuses on the abstract flux of positive and negative spaces within the “frame.” One is tempted to compare this image with Corey Corcoran’s inkjet print, “Grasp,” located in another room of the gallery. We focus immediately on the specific gesture of two hands clasped as if in supplication. But look again — how could our eyes have failed to grasp the eerie falseness of the overlapping digits, rendered in pink clay? Compelling forms abound. Ellen Rich’s “Punch,” a floppy grid of freestanding circular paper cutouts thick with oil-pastel, celebrates the materiality of its bold colors. More aggressively, in “Blue Gun,” Eric Stefanski undercuts the calming steel-blue surface of his foam insulation panels by peeling and pinning back the foil skin; slashing, gashing and slathering paint on the raw interiors; and scrawling invective with the wrong end of a paintbrush. Maxine Yalovitz-Blankenship’s heroic “Portrait of the Artist” subdues an unruly surface of nine individual canvases with a formal grid. Each section, canvas on canvas, alternates thunder with calm — she crumples and pastes down cloths and boldly strips them away, whales away with acrylic paints and impastos, and shakes it all up with strong contrasts of bright, stained colors and pure white relief. Even where emotion appears flat, feeling may abide. In “Desktop #2,” Mark Schoening’s colorful pixilated designs inlaid like marquetry into a grey substrate bespeak a love affair with his computer screen. And anxiety and doubt may underlie the soft silverpoint tracing in “Heads, Tails” of Andrew Mowbray’s repeated tosses of a (flat) quarter onto a (flat) surface. Small but not least, Erika Baglyas’ “Meaning of Safety” persuades us that big and impressive may not be the only winning strategy. Her unpretentious drawing of indigo ink on a stark white sheet almost bores a hole in the wall out of proportion to its size. Whatever its meaning, the dark, sail-like forms weighing against a cloud of scrib- bles are pure delight to the eye. | Elizabeth Michelman NOV/DEC 2015 29 Corey Corcoran, Grasp, 2015, inkjet print, 1/10, 11” x 11” (photo: Melissa Blackall Photography). Liz Nofziger, Ground Lock, 2015, translucent vinyl, variable dimensions (photo: Melissa Blackall Photography).
  28. 28. AShowofContemporaryArt,Craft,andDesign artists selling work in jewelry, clothing, home décor, & furniture 175 DEC.11–13, 2015 Hynes Convention Center, 900 Boylston Street, Boston Friday & Saturday:10–6; Sunday:11–5 Holidays & Highballs preview party Dec. 10! PRESENT THIS AD FOR $3 OFF ONE GENERAL ADMISSION Wreath:StaceyWebber NICK OFFERMAN Sawdust & Mirth Fri, Dec. 11 • 1:30PM Tickets at www.societyofcrafts.org Real-life woodworker Nick Offerman of NBC’s Parks and Recreation talks about why handmade matters. Followed by book-signing in CraftBoston. photocredit:EmilyShur Presented by THE SOCIETY OF ARTS AND CRAFTS 175 Newbury St. Boston www.societyofcrafts.org
  29. 29. Through December 18 | Closed November 25 - 29 for Thanksgiving break Katrina Then & Now: Artists as Witness AN EXHIBITION IN TWO PARTS Liberty, 2011, Generic Art Solutions, photograph courtesy of Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans, LA Part II: The Rebirth of Art B O S T O N P R I V A T E B A N K A V I S U A L F E A S T Opening November 17, 2015 D A Y T O N H O M E W e l l e s l e y R E V O L U T I O N S O F W I N T E R B R I A N D U B I N A S I M P L Y R E A L 11.12.15 - 12.24.15 158 Newbury St, Boston, MA 02116 p:: 617-536-5049 e:: info@copleysociety.org w:: copleysociety.org Tuesday -Saturday 11-6 | Sunday 12-5 | Monday by appointment R O B I N F R I S E L L A Opening November 1, 2015 R E D R O O M G A L L E R Y detail: Apple Reflection by Robin Frisella detail: Red, White and Blue, by Jeanne Rosier Smith detail: Through the Glass by Brian Dubina NOV/DEC 2015 31
  30. 30. OLITSKI AND MCCULLOUGH IN NH The paintings and prints in the Jules Olitski “Lakes, Mountains, Seas” exhibition currently on view at Keene State College’s Thorne- Sagendorph Gallery show an artist who was still in full command of his creative powers in the last decade of his life. He died in 2007 at age 84. The show consists of paintings the THORNE- SAGENDORPH GALLERY KEENE STATE COLLEGE 229 MAIN STREET KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE THROUGH DECEMBER 6 Reviews ANSWERING THE CALL OF THE WILD 32 NOV/DEC 2015 Jules Olitski, Sea of Paradise, 1998, acrylic on canvas, 60” x 84” (photo by Rachel Portesi). Reviews artist made on site during — or that were inspired by — his summers on Bear Island in Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire. He built a studio there, and his family has had a house on the lake since the 1970s.  Olitski had a special relationship with the Thorne-Sagendorph, which the gallery honors with this show, part of a celebration of its 50th anniversary. “Sea of Paradise” (60” x 84”) is perhaps the “WOW!” painting in the show. It is front and center as one enters the first room of the exhibit. Yellows and oranges thrust up like molten lava, meeting purple, wine- red mountains and gray sky. These
  31. 31. elements, though, are not clearly tethered to near or distant ground, horizon or sky. The initial impact, rather, is of an artist in love with paint and painting. Olitski was clearly a prodigious force as an artist — he was in his seventies and eighties when he created this work. Olitski was at his best when the sweeping physicality of his painting had full reign. In the large paintings, the acrylic gels could be applied almost as clay, building up motion and texture. But these landscapes, unlike his purely abstract work, are anchored and structured by what is seen. This gives the work a gravity and complexity that I don’t find in the purely abstract work of his late years. Olitski seems to have relished getting onto the canvas as much color as he could while still making it work — joyously so! He seems almost to be daring his muse and tempting disintegration, but against all odds “the center holds.” In a very few paintings there is perhaps too much paint mixed right on the canvas, resulting in the painting becoming dense, the color muddied, as in “Bear Island Spirit.” But most are gloriously, exuberantly colorist tours-de-force. SPHERE OF INFLUENCE In the upper middle of “Sea of Paradise” floats a dark red orb, like a nucleus around which all else swirls. These orbs in Olitski’s late work evince a profoundly spiritual sensibility — they show up almost like a talisman. One may be a pale yellow or searing white sun; other times they are just there, as Fact, as Presence. While not attached to anything close to traditional Judeo- Christian imagery, Olitski’s titles frequently include biblical references — “Heaven,” “Paradise,” “Temptation.” However, the terms have been unmoored from their static, codified meaning — the paintings are mystical rather than religious. “Temptation Balance” has a wall to itself in a room adjacent to the first, and fully deserves its prominent place. An accretion of palest, almost white tints of pinks and yellows, contrasted against grey-blue, it builds to a mass that pushes at the edges, seems to grow and shimmer before your eyes. It is, more nearly than anything else in the show, reminiscent of Olitski’s “color field” work of the 1970s, but with a great deal more texture; it brings to mind the “pulsations” of color of those paintings. Despite “Lakes, Mountains, Seas” giving so much pleasure in the sensual qualities of paint, one of my favorite paintings in the show, ”Magic Passage,” is uncharacteristically restrained, almost Japanese in the bare means used to convey sky, clouds and sea. The sky — a wash of ultramarine, orange, and white with a splash of yellow — fills more than half the canvas; it is mirrored in a mauve and flamingo-pink sea, upon which a sailboat glides (sailboat is a motif that repeats itself in quite a number Jules Olitski, Dawn Before the Surge, 1998, acrylic on canvas, 40” x 48”. of paintings here, this time conveyed with the barest wisps of white paint). The painting seems almost off-hand yet is masterful in its economic use of gesture.  NOV/DEC 2015 33 Angus McCullough, Through Line, archival ink jet print, 32” x 24”.
  32. 32. The show includes several bronze sculptures that echo themes in the paintings yet are entirely, inherently sculptural.  A whole room is devoted to Olitski’s smaller works on paper, the artist seeming to use whatever medium best suited the mood and the job at hand, including watercolor, gouache, pastels and acrylic paint. Some are whimsical, some are dark and ponderous; others, such as the pastel “Island View,” seem to be uncomplicated impressions of the seen. These less polished, though at times absolutely charming, works are a welcome insight into the creative impulse of a man who was one of the most intense, restless and inwardly illumined artists of our time. NATURE, COLOR, SHAPE AND SPACE Meanwhile, the esthetic assumptions and goals of Angus McCullough’s sculptures showcased in “Float,” a selection of recent works from his “Dirt, Moisture, Theft” series, could not be more disparate from Olitski’s work next door. For all its “wildness,” Olitski’s work still adheres to a classical esthetic — the beauty and power of nature, color, shape and space. McCullough’s sculptures, SUSAN STRAUSS & NANCY SHAND | POETICA VAN VESSEm GAllERY 63 mUSE WAY | TIVERTON RHODE ISlAND 401.835.6639 | vanvessemgallery@gmail.com VVm NOVEmBER 14 THROUGH DECEmBER 13, 2015 ARTIST OPENING: SATURDAY, NOVEmBER 14 FROm 5Pm TO 8Pm Susan Strauss: Discovery, oil on panel, 16” x 16” Nancy Shand: Autumn, oil on canvas, 44” x 44” 34 NOV/DEC 2015 Reviews on the other hand, are nothing if not anti-classical, even anti- esthetic.  The forms of his sculptures are made of expanded foam. The immediate impact is of stuck-together lumps of “stuff,” maybe rescued from the dump. The forms seem that arbitrary, and in fact they are — serendipitous, as McCullough calls it. The artist has removed himself from the process, only setting it in motion. “Then I have to walk away,” he said. The sculptures take days to arrive at their shape, the foam expanding through a chemical reaction. After being coated with an oil-based enamel paint that is floated on water to further randomize the end result, they are attached to thin metal poles that jut into the gallery space from the wall; others, like bizarre birds on skinny legs, stand on the floor.  A statement about our throwaway culture? McCullough stated they are “definitely related to global capitalism.” I assume he feels it is not a pretty picture. “Angus McCullough: Float” continues through December 6.   | Arlene Distler
  33. 33. MONTSERRAT GALLERY OF ART 23 ESSEX STREET BEVERLY, MASSACHUSETTS THROUGH DECEMBER 5 With so many icons crowding into our national, if not global, consciousness, you have to wonder if wood, just wood, holds any longer those numinous qualities we hand out so profligately to tin-pot celebrities. The Druids worshipped wood in the form of living trees. And how many documents of iconic importance were penned under the regal branches of oaks and chestnut? Think of Boston’s own Liberty Tree, now just a bas-relief plaque on the edge of Chinatown, or Longfellow’s spreading chestnut boughs — crowded out by sprawl — under which the doughty village blacksmith labored with glistening brow and ropy muscles. And yet, there are still some souls who roll up their sleeves and peel back layers of prejudice assigning wood, so unjustly, to the lumberyard of our consciousness. And where, you might ask, I hope with some curiosity, is this renaissance happening? In the feisty galleries of the Montserrat College of Art, nestled nicely beside the Beverly Town Common. Just five contemporary artists exhibiting 10 pieces carry the flag for wood as a material fit for the artisan to work and the artist to envision. And they start, daringly, at the bottom of the woodpile, coaxing the divine from scrap, refuse, and despised hybrids while flaunting their lack of polish in order to educate our sight to wood’s inner nobility, and perhaps to curb the hubris of the maker with exacting discipline. It’s hard to discern in this rowdy group who takes the bottommost starting point, but my favorite wood to overlook starts unequivocally with plywood — just the “wood” Harry Reviews WOOD AT MONTSERRAT ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE Roseman embraces. Plywood springs to mind mostly for building purposes, such as strength, durability and arcane qualities like “resistance to creep,” a hardy material hardly fit to excite the aesthete to vapors of delight. Perversely, ingeniously, Roseman uses plywood like origami paper. From the mundanity of this useful laminate he elicits folds so graceful and so delicate they could be mistaken for the natural folds of a chrysalis about to reveal a butterfly, or a leaf or flower bud about to open. These folds can lie flat on the floor or even creep from floor to wall, heroically resisting that “resistance to creep” so prized by builders. One of Roseman’s three sculptures floats entirely on the wall, so deftly and delicately creased into angles and points it could be wet laundry configured by a cubist wind. And yet, under Roseman’s artful tutelage, NOV/DEC 2015 35 BOTTOM LEFT: Damien Hoar de Galvan, Something Could Happen At Any Moment, 2013-2015, mixed-media (found wood, various paints, glue, matchsticks, iTunes gift card, etc.), dimensions varied. WOOD, installation view, Montserrat Gallery, 2015. Foreground: Harry Roseman, Folded Plywood, wood; background (left to right); Sally Tittman, Circus, 2007, wood; Damion Silver, Medicine and Compass, 2015, pine, plywood and fire.
  34. 34. Reviews plywood, while so many other things to the engaged imagi- nation, is still plywood: beige, sturdy, more fit to under-gird the perdurable comforts of our world than sport lyrically on center stage. NOT SO DUMB Ditto with the reclaimed wood Sally Tittmann uses for her sculptures “Circus” and “In the Field.” Tittmann’s wood comes from dumpsters in Dumbo, New York, and it looks like it. Instead of hiding its low origins, the sculptor seems to underline them by fastening these fat pieces of lumber together with screws, unartfully revealing their metal heads barely sunk into a grey, weathered surface. Once together, though unremarkably, these joinings become the joints of limbs; in “Circus” they hold their backbone high while prancing to a lively beat so full of personality it could be Thoreau’s cherished “individual” stepping to a beat all his or her own. Tittmann’s second sculpture, “In the Field,” could well be our “Circus” performer sent “out to pasture,” scrabbling with multiple legs to lift its backbone off the ground of retire- ment into some semblance of vitality. We hear it panting and cheer its efforts. What we most feel is the pathos of a fellow creature overwhelmed by the life-long weight of gravity, by the iron rule of entropy to lie, not without struggle, and wait for dissolution. Michael Zelehoski’s woodwork, in fellowship with his colleagues here exhibiting, relies not on the cachet of rarity or surface glitter, but on an uncanny craft of shaving off and splicing into challenging perspectives the hard-lived top layers of old boards so that they spring from two into three dimensions while we look on, intrigued and mystified. Are these old crates and weathered piles of lumber simple trompe-l’oeil practiced with wonderful skill, or could they be those vintage shapes posited in Plato’s philosophy? Are they not simply an old crate or pile of lumber, but ideal sketches through which every crate and board jumps into, receding from earthly existence? Look again at Damion Silver’s circular assemblages of pine and plywood. I overlooked them at first as artsy evoca- tions of game boards, dartboards more fit for a rumpus room than a gallery. We are all liable to pre-judge in place of more arduous judgment, but a good group show is able to pry open the most resolutely “canned” assessment. A closer look reveals constellations of pattern in the buttery grain of pine and the scorched surface of plywood; what I wrote off as precious and derivative turned mesmerizing. And the overall pattern formed an ever-shifting macrocosm. Finally, and not least, Damien Hoar de Galvan’s work, which the excellent commentary calls a “curiosity cabinet,” became “curiouser and curiouser” the more I looked. At once dignified, loopy, profound and light-hearted, the many small wood-based effigies inhabiting these open wall- shelves might have graced a 1950s-era suburban ranch house — except that instead of cute knick-knacks, these cubbies are loaded with what looks to be an alphabet of alchemical ambition. I had almost worked out a word of like- minded letters when I regressed to just admiring a riddling likeness, a composite of rhyming incongruities. “WOOD” is certainly in the right hands at the Montserrat Galleries in Beverly.  | James Foritano 36 NOV/DEC 2015 Michael Zelehoski, Inversion Cube, 2015, repurposed wood and phenolic plywood, 40” x 33” x 30”. Harry Roseman, Folded Plywood 15, 2012, Draped and Folded Plywood series, AC 1/4 plywood. 61 1/2” x 39” x 42”.
  35. 35. Alden Gallery 423 Commercial St., Provincetown 508.487.4230 aldengallery.com Sharon Weiss Gallery 20 East Lincoln St., Columbus, Ohio 614.291.5683 sharonweissgallery.com Serena & Lily 866.597.2742 serenaandlily.com ORIGINAL PAINTINGS Studio 314 450 Harrison Ave., Boston 617.480.7364 paulpedulla.com ORIGINAL PAINTINGS AND FRAMED PRINTS Vizivel 855.849.4835 vizivel.com SPECIALLY-SELECTED FRAMED PRINTS PAUL PEDULLA CapeatWater’sEdge,acryliconcanvas,30”x30” NOV/DEC 2015 37 CAROL GOVE CONTINUUM November 9, 2015 – January 22, 2016 Artist Reception: Sunday, December 6, noon-3pm CARNEY GALLERY, REGIS COLLEGE FINE ARTS CENTER 235 WELLESLEY STREET, WESTON, MA WWW.REGISCOLLEGE.EDU • 781-768-7034 • GALLERY HOURS: M-F, 10AM-4PM Nudge, 22x30, mixed media collage on panel, 2014 Verdant, 22x30, mixed media collage on panel, 2014
  36. 36. Nora Valdez’s stone sculpture follows ancient traditions, but the insights found in her surrealistic visions are very much of our time. Born in Argentina, Valdez emigrated in her twenties to learn Italian in her mother’s homeland and then went to Spain on a fellowship to learn carving. After a few years assisting in carving public monuments there, she moved to the United States and settled down to raise a family. Since then, she has lived abroad for many months at a time in Europe, China and South America, teaching and carving large-scale works. Most summers, she runs stone-carving workshops on the grounds of a marble quarry at the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center in West Rutland, Vermont while executing her own forms. With modern power tools and her direct feel for the stone, she can sculpt a 10-foot-tall monolith out of marble, limestone or granite in a matter of weeks. Her current summer workshops, teaching carving to Vermont high school students and placing their benches in towns throughout the state, grew out of a previous interna- tional exchange program in Ayacucho, Peru. Valdez taught stone carving to indigenous students for six succes- sive summers, and in the weeks after her courses she obtained the mayor’s support to work with a few chosen assistants to create three monoliths and 40 benches for the city’s central Featured Artist COLO COLO GALLERY 101 WEST RODNEY FRENCH BOULEVARD NEW BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS NOVEMBER 10 THROUGH 28 NORA VALDEZ: RELOCATIONS ANCIENT TRADITION MEETS MODERN VISION Home, 2012, ink and colored pencil on paper, 8” x 10”. Inside Home, 2014, Indiana limestone and steel, 72” x 24” x 18”. 38 NOV/DEC 2015
  37. 37. plaza and boulevard. Valdez continues to travel to Latin America to organize sculpture projects and to exhibit her work. Her art broods on a life of repeated migrations and nomadism as a permanent condition of the heart. In order to continue in her art, Valdez has frequently needed to shift between temporary living arrangements, often giving up one home or studio before finding another. She dreams and draws from her personal trials of repeatedly transitioning among many cultures. SINGLE SOURCE Valdez prefers to call her forms “intimate,” regardless of size. Her simplified figures with smooth oval faces, alone or in massive group- ings, all derive from a single block of stone or wood. They typically (though not invariably) focus on a female wanderer who must always maintain her personal core in relation to others. Though nameless and faceless, these women’s identities are embedded in the gestures, trappings and groupings that position them in the world. Combining surrealism and savvy, she has a gift for transforming nearly inert human forms and commonplace objects into complex signifiers. In her words, she “always needs to tell a story and always adds something to the journey.” She may do this by elevating her figures and groupings on staircases and ramps or placing them on wheels, carts and enclosed platforms. They trudge along with tools and children at their waists and masses of adult figures on their backs. Figures grow into houses and Nora Valdez with Line, 2015, basswood, pine, Indiana limestone, steel, range approximately 48” x 10” x 8” to 66” x 10” x 8”. out of skyscrapers. A band of travelers bears a house that looks like a casket. A foot rests on an egg that rests on a woman’s hips. Lone women carry houses morphing into satchels or lunch bags. By giving up their individual qualities, these beings become larger dualities of mobility and rootedness, alienation and compassion. Although many of her monumental works have found homes around the world, Valdez has more recently been placing them domestically. One massive hollowed block teeming with figures, called “Borne,” is currently being re-situated in a public market in Rutland, Vermont. “Inside Home,” a six-foot tower of immigrant stoneworkers and their families crammed under a limestone roof, has pulled up stakes from Chesterwood’s summer show of contemporary art to resettle at The Art Complex Museum in Duxbury, Mass. Valdez has also been awarded a commission by the Duxbury Free Library for three stone benches and a memorial sculpture in a new Reading Garden Entrance, to be completed next spring. At present, she is completing unfinished works for “Relocation,” a November show at the Colo Colo Gallery in New Bedford. Originally intended for an exhibition she had to cancel in Lima, Peru, the new work was to explore the Buddhist concept of the chakras, or bodily energy fields, tying them to her themes of “the road, the maps, the path and the [idea] of the shifting, going from one place to another.” The show itself is now shifting to an installation restating her peren- nial issues of immigration in relation to the mapping. NOV/DEC 2015 39
  38. 38. WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY 11 - 5 pm (802) 251-8290 mitchellgiddingsfinearts.com 183 Main Street, Brattleboro VT 05301 MITCHELL • GIDDINGS FINE ARTS November 5 - November 29, 2015 PETRIA MITCHELL Stone paths will wind around the sculptures, linking a pair of tall wooden figures on wheels with smaller stone figures mounted on steel ramps, stairs and frames. Valdez views her change in plans positively. Selecting from already familiar work forces her to find new possi- bilities of arrangements and interpretations. She is envisaging new combinations of works with different histories and framing pieces that had previously stood alone in relation to steel structures. Unlike when she shows completely new work, this exhibition will not include the drawings that are integral to her process. Valdez “draws all the time.” Images flow “like a diary,” highly detailed and as enigmatic as dreams. “That’s where an idea first comes, and then it will develop into a show. The sculpture is an extension of the pen.” Nevertheless, each body of work nurtures the next and moves Valdez outward toward new territory. “You can’t get stuck with your problems, you have to keep growing,” she said. “People may not connect with things the way I do, but still they see a part, the bag, the baggage. They compare with their own lives, and they see the connection.” | Elizabeth Michelman Featured Artist Together We Can (detail), 2012, Peruvian marble and steel, 54” x 12” x 48”. 40 NOV/DEC 2015 Progress view, artist at work on The Visitor, large-scale sculpture at Sculpture Symposium in Zhengzhou, China, 2008, white marble, 96”.
  39. 39. Uli Brahmst, Screen 304 16 14 15 17, synthetic polymer on canvas ULIBRAHMST.COM Ken Steinkamp, Between Then and Now, mixed media KENSTEINKAMP.COM Mimo Gordon Riley, Silent Stirrings, oil on canvas MIMOGORDONRILEY.COM Paul M. Murray, Rounding the Mark, photography HARMONICTHREADS.COM Barnet Fain, Late Fall Landscape, Ed. Var. Print, mixed media, intaglio and digital on Mylar w/chine colle FAINART.US 3rd row, right: William Heydt, Bart Dunbar, visionary Leader for the SSV Oliver Hazard Perry, watercolor WILLIAMHEYDT.COM 3rd row, middle: Kelly Milukas, Mysteries, sculpture KELLYMILUKUS.COM 4th row, bottom: Marsha Kartzman, Hills, mixed media monotype w/ watercolor, crayon, collage, thread, watercolor and gauche pencil MARSHAKARTZMAN.COM * the art featured here is a sampling of the multi-faceted talents of the 75 exhibiting artists Elected Artist Members' Annual Exhibition* at the Newport Art Museum September 5, 2015 - January 3, 2016 76 Bellevue Avenue, Newport, RI Museum hours: Tues. - Sat, 10am - 4pm, Art League Rhode Island, One Avenue of the Arts Providence, RI 02903 . 401-861-0500 . office@artleagueri.org Visit us on Facebook and at www.artleagueri.org
  40. 40. SOUTH SHORE ART CENTER 119 Ripley Road, Cohasset, MA Gallery Hours: M–S 10–4, Sun 12–4 781 383 2787 > www.ssac.org Drifting Away, Annemarie Whilton On the E dge November 13 to December 20, 2015 Opening Reception: Friday, November 13, 6–8 pm juried by Denise Markonish ALTclayEleonora Lecei Judy Motzkin Ellen Schön Hess Gallery Pine Manor College 400 Heath Street / Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 www.pmc.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 15, 2015 Exhibition Dates: November 15, 2015 - February 16, 2016 Artists’ Talk and Reception: Thursday, November 19 10:30am The Hess Gallery at Pine Manor College is pleased to present ALTclay, new trends in ceramic sculpture by Boston-area artists Eleonora Lecei, Judy Motzkin, and Ellen Schön. The three artists’ response to nature exists both as overt subject and internal, material structure. Says Ellen Schön: “I have always been interested in the ability of a ceramic vessel to point to something beyond itself—to function as metaphor. Ceramic vessels, physically structured with necks, shoulders, bellies, and feet, can evoke the gesture and anthropomorphized stance of the human body; they also reveal deep aspects of human experience and of the natural world.” Judy Motzkin painstaking manufactures hyper- realistic stones and fossils from various clays in her studio for the installation Sort. Judy notes “...the installation makes them look like they’ve Ellen Schön: “Five Hills Font” 15” x 22” x 22” Smoke-fired clay 2011 Judith Motzkin: “Sorting Box”, 14x18x5 inches, hand-built, fired clay photosbyRussBolt S T O V E F A C T O R Y G A L L E R Y & S T U D I O S SMALL WONDERS EXHIBIT AT THE STOVEFACTORY GALLERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY DECEMBER 5-6 & 12-13, 11AM-5PM CHARLESTOWN OPEN STUDIOS AT THE STOVEFACTORY STUDIOS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY DECEMBER 5 & 6, 11AM-5PM Open to the public, free of charge and handicapped accessible. StoveFactory Gallery • Artists’ Group of Charlestown 523 Medford Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 617-2410130 artistsgroupofcharlestown.com 42 NOV/DEC 2015
  41. 41. THROUGH THE LENS OF HISTORY: gct.com/grandcirclegallery @GC_Gallery Grand Circle Gallery honors the 50th anniversary of the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, through the photography of James H. Barker. Free Admission Wed & Fri: 12–6, Thurs: 12–7, Sat: 10–5 September 17, 2015 – January 2, 2016 347 CONGRESS STREET • BOSTON, MA 02210 • 617–346–6459 PRESENTED BY THE C A M B R I D G E A R T A S S O C I A T I O N 30 . B E L O W JANUARY 9 - 29, 2016 JURIED BY MARY T. TINTI CURATOR, FITCHBURG ART MUSEUM OPENING RECEPTION JANUARY 14, 6 - 9 PM KATHRYN SCHULTZ GALLERY 25 LOWELL STREET CAMBRIDGE MA, 02138 617 876 0246 | INFO@CAMBRIDGEART.ORG CAMBRIDGEART.ORG CAMBRIDGEART/ @CAMBRIDGEARTORG @CAMBRIDGEART FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA NOV/DEC 2015 43 December 5 & 6 from 12-6pm 6 & 20 Vernon St. Somerville, MA www.vernonstreet.com
  42. 42. 44 MAY/JUN 2015 SOLOMON’S COLLECTION & FINE RUGS Old man selling rug Fine, hand-knotted pictorial rug. Wool with silk highlights. 2’ x 3’ 809 Hancock Street (Rt 3A), Quincy, MA 02170 phone 617.779.1900 | fax 617.770.9100 | email info@solomonrugs.com www.solomonrugs.com
  43. 43. I happen to love color — the more bold and brash, the better. I also have a proclivity toward figurative depiction and symbol. So how is it that I have been so taken by the monochromatic work of Scott Tulay, a sorcerer of black, white and gray? I first came across his work many years ago. My first Tulay encounter was with his depictions of the skeletal remnants of ancient New England barns teetering on the brink of oblivion; charred by fire, age and neglect, these relics were balanced on the edge of total collapse. The landscape of the Western Massachusetts valley towns of Upsurge, charcoal graphite, pastel ink on paper, 60” x 132”.  BRATTLEBORO MUSEUM AND ART CENTER 10 VERNON STREET BRATTLEBORO, VERMONT THROUGH FEBRUARY 8 DRAWING ON, IN, OUT SCOTT TULAY IN BRATTLEBORO Sunderland, Hatfield and Hadley is dotted with outworn tobacco barns, and Tulay’s own grandfather was a Hadley tobacco farmer. He fondly remembers his Polish grandmother rolling her own cigars and puffing up clouds of the pungent smoke. These barns resonated with Tulay in a visceral way, and their weathered bones may have circumscribed a longing for a lost past. However, his new magnum drawings showcased at the Brattle- boro Museum and Art Center as part of a group show entitled “Drawing On, In, Out” delve into a new direction. Currently an architect working in Northampton, Tulay is a graduate of MIT, where he studied under the tutelage of T. Kelly Wilson, who was celebrated for his mantra, “See like an artist, think like a designer, feel like a human.” Aside from the staggering monumental size of his new work, Tulay has left the terrestrial plane. A dynamic energy that could be sub-atomic, or a probe, propels his new work into the dark energy of the celestial. Tulay is dancing in a world of imagined possibility on the cusp of the unknown, driven by natural inclination and a sense of serendipity. Suffused with mystery, Reviews NOV/DEC 2015 45
  44. 44. his work makes me recall a line from one of the diatribes of Jim Morrison, “Out here in the perimeter, there are no stars; out here, we is stoned — immaculate.” Tulay’s murals are executed on wide rolls of a heavy weight paper with a textured tooth, and he equates his drawing technique to the process of weaving. His illustrative tools are powdered graphite, charcoal sticks, shaved pastels and ink. His method of application utilizes cotton balls, rags and lace. His most interesting technique involves dipping lace in ink and dragging it across the paper yielding results that are spontaneous, unexpected and intriguing. The centerpiece of this collection is Tulay’s newest work, “Lift,” an enormous work measuring 9 feet high by 10 feet in length. An investigation of the ambiguity of space, here Tulay creates a whirling gyre of light. Light, a dynamic and ephemeral force, courses through the work, wild, untamed, yet creating a sense of equilibrium. “Drawing On, In, Out” complements Tulay’s explorations with the work of Cristina de Gennaro, Terry Hauptman, Monique Luchetti, Craig Stockwell and Jane Sutherland. The exhibition’s intent is to illustrate the variety and scope of contemporary drawing. | Greg Morell Reviews Content Culture History Design Curation Collections solutions SIDEBAR Every exhibit is about the experience both for your staff and your visitors. Contact SIDEBAR solutions. From strategy to leadership to workplace culture, we can help you thrive. sidebarsolutions@gmail.com 202.446.3581 Scott Tulay in studio working on his drawing, Lift. IDENTITY SYSTEMS1 MAIN LOGO IDENTITY SYSTEMS IDENTITY SYSTEMS1 MAIN LOGO IDENTITY SYSTEMS C M Y CM MY CY CMY K 46 NOV/DEC 2015
  45. 45. MAY/JUN 2015 47 413-854-7744 Marilyn Kalish Vault Gallery cool and green 45 x 85 www.marilynkalish.com
  46. 46. NOV/DEC 2015 CENTERFOLD CONIGLIOCONIGLIO BeverleyBeverley
  47. 47. Influenced by Art Nouveau, Art Deco, the Victorian look without the Victorian principles, Gothic and Steampunk, Beverley is fascinated by all kinds of creatures: furry & scaled, feathered and fanged; and all things magical & mystical, flights of fancy, whimsical visuals. One can often find her filtering through forgotten corners in dusty bins. Salvaging the lost and abandoned, unearthing treasures to be incorporated into her latest projects. Recycling them in such a way that brings them new life and purpose. ARTISTSTATEMENT Metalwork theme centerfold contest winner: BEVERLEY CONIGLIO, TIARA, one of a kind. IN THE CENTERFOLD : Beverley Coniglio, of House of Coniglio TO SEE MORE OF CONIGLIO’S WORK, VISIT: HOUSEOFCONIGLIO.COM NOV/DEC 2015 49
  48. 48. NEW BRITAIN MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART 56 LEXINGTON STREET, NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT WADSWORTH ATHENEUM MUSEUM OF ART 600 MAIN STREET HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT The New Britain Museum of American Art (NBMAA, 1903) and the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art (1842) recently reopened after major building renova- tions and expansions, followed by reinstallation of their collections and exhibitions. Both institutions look spectacular. In this review I reveal my favorite works of art at each, a surprise even to myself. So, keep reading. The Wadsworth is the oldest continually operating public art museum in the United States, while the NBMAA is the first museum in the country dedicated to the development of American art. Coincidental similarities between the two include large-scale murals by Connect- icut native Sol LeWitt as prominent decorative features in the entrance lobby areas: “Whirls and Twirls (2004)” at the Wadsworth and “Scribbles (2005)” at NBMAA. Both institutions also feature amusing photorealist sculptures as part of their permanent contemporary offerings: Marc Sijan’s “Security Guard (2006),” functions as the museum’s mascot and welcomes visitors to NBMAA. At Wadsworth, Duane Hanson’s subversive “Sunbather (1971),” lounges within the glow of Andy Warhol’s pop art “Early Colored Jackie (1964)” and against the backdrop of Robert Rauschenberg’s “Retroactive, I (1964),” a portrait of President Kennedy. The NBMAA is recognized as the first museum to collect Post-Contemporary (PoCo) art, with figurative realist allegory “The Cycle of Terror and Tragedy: September 11, 2001” by Graydon Parrish as the establishing work within the movement on permanent display. The focus on contemporary figurative realism continues with its “Stone Roberts: Street Scenes, Still Life and Figures” exhibition, on view until January 17, 2016. Another significant aspect of the NBMAA is the manner in which curators have created dialogue between the contemporary and historic collections. Older paintings are given a fresh viewpoint, while the contemporary works are given cultural legitimacy. Within the “Appropriation & Inspiration” arrangement, select artworks from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries are displayed next to a 21st century contemporary counter- part. Old and new are juxtaposed to demonstrate how contemporary artists borrow from antecedent ideas, NEWLY RENOVATED MUSEUMS SHINE IN CONNECTICUT Featured Museums The author in front of Thomas Hart Benton’s (1889–1975) The Arts of Life in America: Arts of the City, 1932, tempera with oil glaze, 96” x 264”, at the New Britain Museum of American Art. 50 NOV/DEC 2015
  49. 49. TOP RIGHT: Mark Dion/ Matrix 173: The Wadsworth Atheneum’s Great Chain of Being (exhibition detail 2015-2016), 16” x 20” c-prints (courtesy Mark Dion and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, New York), at Wadsworth Atheneum.   BOTTOM LEFT: Norbert Brunner, Suzi, 2010, acrylic glass, wood, adhesive foil (front); Nobu Fuku, Incredulity, 2012, mixed media on canvas over panel (left); and Gabi Trinkaus, LO SE MON, 2014, collage (printed matter on canvas), at the New Britain Museum of American Art. subject matter, styles and process, while inventing new ways of communicating and constructing. The dialogue- duos (sometimes trios) are labeled to assist viewers with interpretation. One established example is “West Rock Branches, 2012” by Valerie Hegarty, a fairly well known contemporary interpretation of landscape painting and sculpture, using both two- and three-dimensional process. It was commis- sioned by the museum as a commentary on Frederic E. Church’s “West Rock, New Haven,” 1849, and hangs next to it. There’s nothing special about Church. The painting is not extraordinary beyond the regional subject matter, but the process of alternating between him and Hegarty in visual discussion and comparison is fun. To fully under- stand and appreciate the contemporary example, the viewer is forced to give respect to the painting style of the older generation. My favorite within this arrangement is a feminist duo: Cindy Sherman’s, Untitled, 2000, a photographic self- portrait portraying a white, American, middle-class woman paired with the c. 1829-1835 folk-art style oil portrait of “Abigail Waters Putnam” by Erastus Salisbury Field, a self-taught male painter. Field was probably not a feminist nor was Ms. Abigail, but the manner in which their portrait is displayed with the Sherman is disruptive and thoughtful. The juxtaposition brings attention to the reality of false representations of Self as omnipresent, as stated perfectly on the explanatory label “the formulaic pose, the fashionable dress … contrived hairdo … suggest a prepared composition…” At the Wadsworth, the focused curatorial arrange- ment centers on “The Matrix” method. “The Matrix” is a system of art-making by new artists that borrows from the museum’s permanent collection. Continuing the tradi- tion is Mark Dion’s “Matrix 173: The Great Chain of Being.” On view until January 3, 2016, it’s a remarkable and intel- lectual assemblage of 125 prints exploring the complexi- ties and interconnectiveness of biological life from the simplest forms to the most complex. Each individual print, presented as a small square framed tondo, is a detail image taken from works of art within the Wadsworth’s permanent collection. If you know the collection well enough, you might be able to identify specific details with Dion’s work. The highlight of the Wadsworth collection is the renovated Morgan Great Hall, installed in the traditional “Salon Style,” featuring 37 paintings from the 14th-19th centuries. Within this space, the most loved work is Giovanni Paolo Panini’s “The Picture Gallery of Cardinal Silvio Valenti Gonzaga,” 1749. My personal favorites are an interior architectural scene, “The Men’s Bath,” c. 1645 by the Italian duo Viviano Codazzi and Domenico Gargiulo; and a beautiful moody winter Flemish landscape, c. 1581-1624, by Carel Liefrinck the Younger. NOV/DEC 2015 51
  50. 50. In the next gallery, connecting the modernist narrative, is an example of Pollock’s early work, a small landscape in the Benton style, on display alongside an abstracted, almost cubist Benton landscape. These two are paired up with a small composition by another great: Lee Krasner, an abstract expressionist revolutionary who was Pollock’s muse, nurse and spouse. In this one small section alone we learn a significant amount about the rise of modernism in pre- and post-World War II America. If Benton wasn’t enough — along with a wonderful collection of American Western Painting and sculpture, which includes two Ralph Albert Blakelock moonlight landscapes (the only romantic 19th century landscapes I personally like), and a must-see mesmerizing portrait by Robert Frederick Blum entitled “The Emigrant Model (1882)” — there’s the overwhelming ART Today: 2000-Present. Within this space, here are my Top Three Choices: “He Died for US?” — Alexis Peskine’s 2007 mixed-media portrait of a black man hanging by the neck, his head featuring a gold halo and composed mostly of industrial nails, that addresses race, power and equality dynamics; “Suzi,” a painted acrylic three-dimensional glass cube showing the vague portrait of a woman reminiscent of pointillism by Norbert Brunner; and Katja Loher’s “Portal VI (Ideology/Hope),” a two-part, self-contained 2014 video-sculpture addressing ecology and human connection and featuring moving dancers, insects and music in kaleidoscopic fashion. Other worthy contemporary works to look for: Andrew Erdos, “Cheerfully Rooting through Ruby Red Detritus (2013),” a stunning sculpture of silverized glass, mirrors and crystal, and the two collage paintings by Radcliffe Bailey examining race, history and identity politics. At the Wadsworth, the Modern and Contemporary Collection includes some of the best-known and most influential artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. After digesting the Picassos and Miros (my Spanish favorites) on view, my one Top Choice is a surprise: Andy Warhol. I generally dislike Warhol, but “Triple Silver Disaster (1963),” a minimal painterly silver silkscreen and enamel on canvas, is stunningly beautiful. It’s my selection because, outside of the obvious gorgeous aesthetics, it addresses a subtle yet powerful theme: the death penalty. It brings to mind a connection to Truman Capote’s brilliant 1965 book, “In Cold Blood,” set in the complex minimalist prairie landscape of Kansas — an environment I under- stand intimately. I still dislike Warhol, but “Triple Silver Disaster” is truly sublime. We shift back to New Britain to examine the great and conten- tious Regionalist painter Thomas Hart Benton, next up on my list of favorites. NBMAA famously houses the extraordinary “The Arts of Life in America” murals from 1932 in a newly built gallery space. During my visit, longtime docent George Martin explained the murals’ iconic history, pointing out that a model in Benton’s murals — a figure playing the harmonica in the “Arts of West” panel — is purported to be Benton’s young student, (Paul) Jackson Pollock. IN THIS ONE SMALL SECTION ALONE WE LEARN A SIGNIFICANT AMOUNT ABOUT THE RISE OF MODERNISM IN PRE- AND POST-WORLD WAR II AMERICA. Featured Museums Duane Hanson, Sunbather, 1971, polyster and fiberglass polychromed in oil (front); and Robert Rauschenberg, Retroactive 1, 1964, oil and silkscreen ink on canvas, at the Wadsworth Atheneum.

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