Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

PsychoEducation Model - Joseph Zalman Sheppard (Science Poster).pdf

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad

Check these out next

1 of 1 Ad

PsychoEducation Model - Joseph Zalman Sheppard (Science Poster).pdf

Download to read offline

This update of the PsychoEducation Tensor includes Chomsky/s (2000) concept of "agreement" and other minor corrections and tweaks. This model is intended to be a complete model of the universe and cognition.

This update of the PsychoEducation Tensor includes Chomsky/s (2000) concept of "agreement" and other minor corrections and tweaks. This model is intended to be a complete model of the universe and cognition.

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

PsychoEducation Model - Joseph Zalman Sheppard (Science Poster).pdf

  1. 1. Fast processes (System 1) include beliefs (EM2) that model sensory integrations like somatic schemas and exteroceptive navigational land- marks (EM10); or rationally accommodate or schematically update unexpected sensory feedback. Likewise, propositional attitudes (EM8) guide navigational path integrations that recontextualize perception and situational awareness (EM4) or accommodate social men- talizations (EM9) with effortful social reasoning. “Focused attention”and“open moni- toring”are two forms of mindfulness, and“tuning out”and“zoning out”are two forms of mind wandering. Rest- ing mindfulness may be depicted as the conscious decoupling of EM2 or EM8 with EM10 (sensations). Whereas dissociative mind-wandering may be depicted as the conscious decoupling of EM2 or EM8 with EM4 (perception). The intrapersonal circumplex and dual internal navigation illustration of EM-Core describe the two primary interpersonal characteristics of dominance and trust. Whereas the two primary internal navigation systems of path integration and landmark navigation are depicted diagonally. Depression may be more associated with a decou- pling of EM2 schema and EM10 sensory models, and anxiety may be more associated with resis- tance to perceived egocentric path integration. Core-affect describes a cirumplex of three hedonic drives (cognitive desire, liking, and incentive salience) orthogo- nally arranged with three types of arousal (power, reward, and affiliation). The three hedonic drives motivate three columns of EM-Core cognitive processing and the three arousal types mediate conscious contents as a fourth column of EMRed, EMGreen, & EMBlue. The functional and task-driven EM-Core cognitive capacities are dissociable into four reportable voices, including an illocutionary (reinforcement learning)“actor”that is intentionally reportable (EM3), a logical justification or“critic”voice that reports epistemic feelings and epistemic judgments (EM5), an allomaternal voice that interprets emotional experiences and feelings of attachment (EM7), and reportable mind wandering that integrates visual and auditory mental imagery into dream-like episodic memories (EM9). Emotional empathy interprets syntactic meaning from three types of arousal that mediate consciousness (intrinsic information), and cognitive empathy intelligently applies syntactic meaning through skilled behaviour (extrinsic information). Cognitive empathy outputs as three temporal dynamics; (a) crystal intelligence as conceptual coherence (atemporal), (b) co-authored autobiographical or episodic scenes (temporally extended), and (c) fluid intelligence as somatically applied novel skill (the present moment). Internal Merge is indexed according to dominance-subordina- tion dynamics & external Merge is paired according to affiliation relations. The four reportable error voices are perseverative versions of the four reportable task-focused voices of EM-Core (EM3 reportable intentions, EM5 reportable feelings of knowing, EM7 reportable emotions, and EM9 reportable dreams & hallucinations). The remaining four elements surrounding EM6 are the corner elements that provide latent source signals (like moments in a quadrupole) that synergize into reportable elements. These corner elements include EM2 functional identity schemas, EM4 situational aware- ness & perception, EM8 interoceptive somatic markers & attitudinal propositions, and EM10 sensory integrations & instinctual urges. Personality variations are indicative of elements that self-gener- ate neural signals within individual EM-Core elements. Typically allomaternal personality is situated on EM7, yet alternative element-recursing personality constructs may self-generate from any element with different characteristics. Each element is internally incomplete due to Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems. The four reportable voices of EM-Core may be viewed as each clustering to five other EM-Core elements. EM3 represents five categories of intentional speech acts associated with a hybridization of semantic and procedural memory that directs kine- matics and assertoric, or illocutionary, force. EM5 epistemic logical justifications, feelings of knowing, confidence judgments, heuris- tic judgments, and intuitions are mediated by epistemic secondary reward weighting. EM5 is primarily categorized according to five types of logical justification. Logical justifications are typically used to rational- ize EM3 actions expressed as illocutionary force mediated by game theory. EM5 has five phase transitions: (1) Machiavellian strategies, (2) task regulation, (3) logical justifications & the resting mind, (4) perse- verative feedback, & (5) schizoid avoidance. EM7 emotion-mediated personality is categorized by the Big Five personality traits. EM7 is grounded in the allomaternal circuit and mediates secure, avoidant, disorganized, & anxious-ambivalent attachment styles. EM9 language pragmatics and counter- factual scene gestalt capacities are cate- gorized according to five types of gestalt integrations, as episodic coherence, and as categories of language pragmatics (excluding speech acts) that contextual- ize the meaning of spoken language according to the regulation of exterocep- tive and interoceptive signals including prosody, nonverbal communication, implicature, and contextual relevance. EM9 expresses spontaneous cognitions, and EM3 expresses deliberate cognitions. Chiral EM5 (mirror image) doxological or epistemic personality is categorized as an epistemic version of the Big Five personality traits. The chiral version of the Big Five personality traits is indica- tive of the core traits associated with Broad Autism Phenotype (BAP), Autism, and Autism Savant Syndrome, depending on the EM5 chiral phase transitions of the epistemic personali- ty in a similar pattern to non-chiral EM5 phase-transitions. The“I”and“Me” distinction is from William James. The PsychoEducation Tensor (PET)® is a diamond-shaped skew-hermitian 4x4 tensor transformational matrix describing 16 elementary brain processes. The PET divides into a 7-element metacognitive component called EM-Path, repre- sented by colours and letters, and a 9-element cognitive component called EM-Core, represented by numbers. The PET® describes a set of Vygotski- an-like elementary mental processes that consti- tute an integrated model of cognitive architecture. The organization of the elements is consistent with the scientific literature on mind wandering and spontaneous cognitive processes. The PET® was designed as a psychoeducational tool to help reduce psychological distress and mental perplexi- ty. The PET® further integrates with dual comple- mentary classical and quantum models of physics. Moreover, the PET® interfaces with dual physical stimuli environments and socially constructed propositional narratives. The PET® may also serve as a minimalist program for cognitive architecture. EM-Theory claims that conceptual and knowledge consciousnesses are chiral and complementarity. ©, 2022 The PsychoEducation Tensor (PET)® describes a comprehensive set of 16 cognitive systems that combine Baars’(2015) division of 13 primary cognitive systems with Trofimova and Robbins’(2016) division of 3 primary arousal systems.“The 26 PsychoEducation Constructs”is a companion wellness intervention that aids the learning of the 16 elemental modules, the 5-levels of EM-Core, and the 5 Principles of APA Ethics as an EM5“Inner AI”sandbox. Baars, B. J. (2015). Consciousness - , (8):2207. Sheppard, J. Z. (2021). [Masters of Science Thesis, University of Victoria]. (Provides a more in-depth account of EM-Theory) Trofimova, I., Robbins, T. W. (2016). Temperament and arousal systems: a new synthesis of differential psychology and functional neurochemistry. , 64, 382-402. Developmental inner-voice speech includes social speech, private speech, and inner speech (Vygotsky). Face expression mediates human communication with variations in affect, informational contexts, and cultural cues. EM-Theory subdivides four primary categories of metacognition into a 4x4 grid of subscale capacities.     ­ € ­ ‚ ƒ„  † ­   ‡ˆ ­ ‰  ƒŠ ‹ ­    ‡  ‡   ‡ ‰‡   ‡  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡ ‘ Ž† ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡  Ž† ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡  ƒŽ† ‡­  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ‡­  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ƒ‡­  ‡ €   ‡­  ‡ €  ‡  ‡­  ‡ €   ‡­  ‡ Œ  ‡ˆ­ ‡ ‡’ ­ Œ† ‡ ‡ ƒ“‡­ ‡ ‡ ­ ‘ Œ ‚ ” ƒ  ‡ ˆ ˆ  ‡Ž†‡  ‡ ‰‡  ‡  ˆ  ‡ ‡  ‡‹  ‡‚ ˆ  ‡  ƒˆ  ‡ ˆƒ ƒŠ  ‡Œ„ƒ    ƒ ˆ ‡  ˆ   ­ €  Œ•Œ† ‰  ­   ˆ ‡    ­ ‚   Œ ˆ•‡ ­ ‰  Œ•–ƒ„ƒ ­  Œ•ˆ ­ Œ‡ƒ‡ ˆŠ —ˆ ƒ ƒ­ ƒ‚† ˆ ‡ „ˆ‡“  ƒ ˆ ‰‡ ˆ ‡ ‚ ˆ —ƒˆ­ Œ†    ƒŠ˜ ‰ ­ ˆ    ™Š˜ ‰ ­ Œ‡ƒ‡ ˆ  Œ‡ƒ‚‡ ‚  Œ Š‡ ‚ ‰ •‡Œ ˆ Narrative Ethnosphere Physical Environment  ƒ ƒ š ›ƒ ˆ ›ƒ  ›ƒ ‘† ›ƒ ‡ ›ƒ ˆ ›ƒ  œƒ ƒ œƒ ƒ œƒ   ”ƒ ž ’Ÿ ’   ž¡ ’¡Ÿ ’¡ ˆƒˆ ‘    ‡ ‘ ˆƒˆ ‘ ˆƒˆ ‘ ‡„ƒ€ ‡„ƒ€ ‡„ƒ€ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ††•‡ ‡ ˆ‚ˆ ‘ Ÿ ˆ‡ ­ ‘ ‡ ˆ ¢£¡­ †† ˆƒ •‡ ­ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ ‘œ‚  ­ ” ‚ ƒ Œ ‘  ƒ ­® ‰ Š ƒ ƒ  œ  ‡ ƒ   €  ‰  ƒ‡  ‡ ‰ – ‚ˆ ƒ ‚ƒ ‡ —ƒ  ‰‡  † ‚ƒ Œ† ‚ƒ ‚“ ‚ƒ š’ƒ   ˆˆ ‰›ƒƒˆ‰ˆ € ™ ˆ —‡   ‘ƒŒ ¤—¤„‡¤ £¤­ ›ƒ‡‡¡­‘ƒŠ ˆ € † ˆˆ ‡ ‡ˆ ¤¤‘ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ‘’ ‚‰”‚‡”‡™ƒ¤¥Œ ¤£¤­ ? ­ £ ˆ ‡ ©¤¦ žˆ ¤ ›ƒƒˆ’ƒ ­ Œ ˆ­  ‡ ­ € ­ ƒ ƒƒ ­ ‚ ‰‡ ­ ’ ‡ˆ­           ’  ˆ ˆ ˆ­    ­ €‚ ‚ ƒ  „ † „ƒ† ˆ ˆ ‡ ˆ €‡ †  ‡† ‡ †  ‡ ‰†Šˆ ‹ ‡ †  „‡­ Œ‡†­Ž €‚    Œ ˆ •‡‚‡ ˆƒ ˆ ‡  ‡•‡ ‘ š Š Œ† ’‡ ‡ ˆ  ‹ „ † ˆ •‡ƒ‡ „ ƒ­ ƒ  •‡   Š€ ‰ •‡‰‡ ¡­„ §ƒ    ˆ ‡ƒ ƒŸ ¨ˆƒˆ„ƒ€ †­Ž‘ ”© ¡‰ ˆ  ˆ ‡ˆ† ‡ƒ¤œ‘ Š¤„™Š”š’ƒ £‘ ƒ ˆ ˆ š’ƒ ”© ¡‰ ˆ  ˆ‚  ˆˆ£ „ ’ „‚‚   Š€­ – ŒŠ  ƒ ­ ª œˆ ª„  Œ Š ª‰‡ ª¦ƒ ªŒ   ¡Œ‡  ‘‡ ˆ «‰¬ ˆ ¦ƒ ‡ˆ„ •‡ ¦ƒ  ¦ƒ  ‰ˆ‡ ¦ƒ   ¦ƒ  ‰ ¦ƒ  ˆ ¦ƒ  ˆ Œ† ’‡ ‡ ˆ Œ† ’‡ ‡ ¦ƒ ‡ˆ —ƒ  Œ† ’‡ ‡­  ‘“ ‘­ ‹ ‘ š ¦ƒ ˆ ­ œ ˆ‘ ™‰­ ™‘‘ ™Š ™ ­ ‹ ‘ ™­ ‘ –Š’ Œ  ®­ ‘ ‘ š   ­ ™‘‘ ˆ ƒ ™ ­  ‘ ™ —ƒ ­ ‘ –ˆ ‘ —  ƒŠ˜  „™ ˆ ­ ‚ ‘  ƒŠ˜  „‡ ­ ‚ ‘  ƒŠ˜ „‡ ­  ˆ ­«¬ ‚¤‚ƒˆ¤‚ƒ  ˆ ™  ˆ ™ •‡ ¦ƒ‡  š ‡ ‰­ ‘‡Š Œ‡ ˆŠ ” ˆ  Œ ­ œƒ ˆ „ ˆ š ­ ƒ – ‹ ˆ ‰ ­ ‰ €  š  † ˆ ™ ­ ™ ‘‡ ‚ƒˆ­ ‰€Š ‚   ‘‡ ‚ƒˆ­ ˆ  • ˆ‹‡ •  ˆ ‚ƒˆ­ The Shadow Triad of grandiose narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy (hypo-allomaternal orientation) or type-A personality (hyper-allomaternal orientation) further emerge as competitive reward-seeking dominates EM-Core behaviours. Five manifestations of EM-Core correspond to five phase transitions of EM5 epistemic supervised learning styles, from over-amalgamated to fragmented. ‰ ƒ  ‡ ‚ † ‚ „ €  ˆ­ ‚  ‚­ ‘  ‘  €   ˆ „‡­ ˆˆ  ‡ ‘  ‘ ˆ ˆ •€  ƒ ˆ™Š˜  Œ ‡ ƒ ƒ ‰ˆ‡ ˆ  ˆ ƒ ‰™Š˜  ‘ ‚­ œ‡Œ ‰™Š˜  Œ ‡  ƒ ‚­ ˆŠ ‡ ‚“ ˆ„ Š „ ƒ ‚­ ‚  • ˆ œ  ‡    ® ƒ† ‚“ •® Š ‚“ ƒ «‰¬® „ƒ  ‘ˆ ƒ « ƒ¬® „ƒ  ƒŠ  ˆ  ‚‡‚­ ‡    ‰  ‡  œ  ‡   ‚­ † ˆ ˆ ¦ƒ­ ” œ ˆ  ƒ  •‡ ¦ƒ ­ š    ™   ‚ Š­ ” ‰  €ƒ‹ ­  „ ˆ Œ‡  „‚‡ ƒ ‚†  „ ™Š˜  ƒ ‚“ „ Œ‡  «’ ‚¬ˆ  ”Š’ —ƒŠ Œ Š– Œ Š ˆ „‡ Œ Š Žˆ ‰ Œ Š ƒ  ˆ Œ Š –ƒ ‚ƒ  ‰ˆ‡     •Š¡«‚  Œ˜ ¬– ƒ  ‰ ƒ™ƒ ƒ   ­  €­ ‚­ ””ˆˆ ‰‡ — ­ ‰ €‡­ €‡ ‚“ ‚ ­ ‰‡ — ‰ € ­ €‡ ‚“ ‚ ­ Œ ƒ ” € ‘ ‰­ ‚ œ • € „ƒ ƒ Šˆ ‡ ‘ ™ƒ ƒ ‰‡   ­ ‡ˆ  –ƒ€ ­ Œ ” ƒ ‰ ƒ ‡ ‚ƒ ƒ ‡ ƒ‡ Œ ƒ ‰ ‚®„ƒ ‡­ ˆˆ  ‚ƒˆ ‰ ­ ˆ ‰ ƒ ‰ ‰ ’ •œ  ­ ’ œ•  ­ ’ˆ ’ ’ ‚ƒˆ  ƒ‡  Œƒˆ ­  ‡ ‘ ’ œ‡ ‘ ‚ €    ‰  ‡  Œ  ‘ ˆ  ‘ ƒ ‡  ˆ ‰  ‡   „ Š ˆ š  ‡Œƒˆ­  ™ƒ ˆ š   ’­ ˆƒ‘  • ƒ­ ž‡™ƒ ’ ‡ •–‡ ­ „ Š Œ  ’‚ƒ • Œ     ‡ˆ ” ””ƒ ‡ •‡ƒ‡‡ˆ ‰   ‡ œƒ ‡ Œ  ­ €   ‡ €ˆ „  ‚‡ˆ „‡ƒ®” ­ ƒ „‡ƒ ¦ƒ  ˆ ‰ˆ­ ˆ „‡ƒ ˆ­ „‡ƒ®”ƒ  ­ Žˆ ‘Š ƒ‘ ­ ˆ ƒƒƒ­ ƒˆˆ„ Žˆ ”ƒ ‡­ Ž† ‡ ‰‡  ƒ ‰‡ –ƒ ˆˆ­ •‡ˆˆ­ –Š ˆˆ­ ‰ ˆ­  ˆ­  ˆ­ ” ‚ ƒ Œ ‘ ® „ ƒ ‚     „ ‚ ­ ‘ ƒ  š  ‡ ­  † ­ ƒ‡™ƒ™­ ‘ ƒ ™ ‡™­ ‘ ƒ ž‡™ƒž™­‘ ƒ ‰  ‡ •  ˆ € ƒ ‚ƒ ™  †« ˆ¬ ˆ† ¡ ­  ’ ‡ ‰‡ ‡  ‡ ™­ €   ™ ­ € ž™­ € „‚­€  ’ ‡­  Œ ­  ƒ‘ ­ ”ˆ §ƒŠ ­ ‘ ƒ ‘ Š¥ ‘ ƒ ‘ Š ‚ˆ ˆ  Œ Œ ˆ Œƒ  ­Œ‡ƒ ˆ  Œ ­ „ƒ ‡­ ‚ƒ † ‘ ƒ ‚ƒ † ‘ ƒ  ƒ‘ œ‡ –ƒ   ­ ” ¤  ¤ ‚ƒ   ‡Œ ­ – ‘ œ‡ Œ†  ™ ˆ‹ ˆ Œ† œ‡ € ƒ­ ž¨ ‘š†­ ˆ‘ˆ‰ˆ‡ ƒ“­ ™¨–ƒ «‘  ¬™Š ­•Žˆ ‡­ „‚¨Œ‡  ‚‡  ­  Œ Š  ƒ­ ™¨– ”ƒ œ‡­   ƒŒ ˆˆ‚†‰­  ‘ ƒ EM-Core includes five phase transition configura- tions from high to low internal elemental integra- tion. The five EM-Core levels correspond to four large-scale brain networks including the CEN (1st 5th), the DAN (2nd), the DMN (3rd), and the VAN (SN) (2nd). For example, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of the CEN is implicated in either deliberate on-task contextual decision-making when engaged in task processing (DAN), or spontaneous off-task contextual mind wandering when engaged with personal saliences (VAN/SN). M e n t a l S e t - S h i f t i n g C o g n i t i v e E m p a t h y ( T r a n s l a t e s M e a n i n g i n t o P r o b l e m S o l v i n g ) E m o t i o n a l E m p a t h y ( T r a n s c r i b e s M e a n i n g f r o m A r o u s a l ) E m p a t h i c R e s o n a n c e ‚Š  Œ Š ˆ ¤ ’ ‡ˆ¤  ‡ ‰‡ ­ Œ ‰ˆˆ  ‚ƒŠ‡ –Š ’ ‡ˆ­ œ £™  ‚‡ ¤‰ ™Š˜ Œ ‡¤ ’ ‡ ˆ­ €  „ ™ ‚ƒ œ ­ ‚  € ƒ –‡ ‚ƒ ‘ ˆ­ ‘ ‰‡ ‚ƒ  ­ Œ Š ‰  ¤ ‚‡ ¤ ”ˆ ¤ Žˆ ­   ™Š˜ Œ ‡¤ ƒ‚†¤ ‡ ¤  ƒ ˆ­ Œ Š ˆ  ‚ˆ ƒ­ ‰  „‡ € ˆ ‚ƒ ¤ ˆ „‡¤ ˆ ­ Œ Š ‘ˆ–ƒ ‰ˆ‡–ƒ‚ƒ  ‰ˆ‡¤—ƒ ¤ ’ ‡¤ ”­ S e n s e Sense M eaning M e a n i n g R e f e r e n c e R e f e r e n c e K i n e t i c A r o u s a l A f fi l i a t e A r o u s a l T a s k S e t - S h i f t i n g ‚ ‘ Œ ” ƒ Œ Š „‡Ž†‡  ¦ƒ ‡ˆ¤ •‡ ¦ƒ ¤  ƒ‡ ­ ‰ ‰– ‰¤ ”Š —ƒŠ¤ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ † ‡­ I n v a r i a n t O b j e c t S e t - S h i f t i n g  „‡ „ ‡ ‰‰ Š¤ –ƒ’ ‡ˆ­ ‚  ­ €  Šƒ ™ ’  ˆ  ˆ ˆ­ ® €    ‰‡¤ ˆŠ ‡¤ ƒ ƒ­ J o s e p h Z a l m a n S h e p p a r d , 2 0 2 2 ‰    ƒ      ­ ® E p i s t e m i c C o l u m n E p i s o d i c C o l u m n E m b o d i e d C o l u m n ‡   ‘ • ‡ E m p a t h i c C o l u m n ˆŠ «¬ ¤‚ƒˆ¤‚ ˆ  ™  ‡–­ ‚‡Š • ¦ƒ ­ œƒ ˆ • ’ ‰‡­ ‡„   ƒ  ‡‰­ ‰ € • ƒ ‰  ­ ‚ƒˆ ‚€ƒ‚ˆŠ ‘‡ ‘‡ ‚€ƒ‚ˆŠ ‚  ƒ‚ ˆ ˆ ˆŠ ˆ ‡ ˆ ‚ƒ ‘  „ ‡    ™ Š ˜  ­ Œ ‡ „ ­ ‚ ˆ  ‡   ˆ ™ Š ˜  ‚ „ „ ‰ „ ‰ˆ‡ ‚ ‘ˆ‡ „ ‹  ­Œ‡ ‚ ƒ‹ „¨“ƒ‚ ˆˆ ‚¨ƒ‚ˆ Œ Š ‰  ƒ ˆƒ Œ Š ˆ Œ Š ‘ˆ Œ Š „‡ Ž†‡ €   €   ‰  „‡  ‡ ‘ R e c o h e r e n c e P H I ( I n t r i n s i c I n f o r m a t i o n ) (I n te g ra te d In fo rm a ti o n T h e o ry ) ›ƒƒˆ ™Š ›ƒƒˆˆ ƒ‡ Œš †­ ›ƒƒˆ  ƒ  šŽ†Ž† ‡™­ ›ƒƒˆ ˆ ƒ Ž† ˆ‡  š † ˆ­ ›ƒƒˆ š š † ˆ ˆ‡  Ž†„ ™Š­ ›ƒƒˆ ‰ˆ œ‡œ‘‡  ˆ­ ›ƒƒˆ ˆˆƒ   ‡ ­ ›ƒƒˆ ‡ˆ  • ‹­ D e c o h e r e n c e ( E x t r i n s i c I n f o r m a t i o n ) ‚ ‘ Œ ” ƒ  ›ƒ  (Consciousness as 9th Hybrid State) P H I P H I ›ƒ  Q u b i t # 2 (T w o S ta te s O n e H y b ri d ) Q u b i t # 3 Q u b i t # 1 (e .g ., E M 4 E M 1 0 + E M 7 S in g le 8 - S ta te Q u d it (E M 2 - E M 1 0 R o ta ti n g A ro u n d H y b ri d E M 6 ) E n c o d e s T h re e Q u b it s Q u a n t u m C o m p u t a t i o n a l C o m p l e m e n t a r i t y P E T T e n s o r ® 1 s t L e v e l E M - C o re A c ts a s T h re e Q u b it s 5 th L e v e l E M - C o re A c ts a s O n e 8 - S ta te Q u d it T h e 5 E M - C o re L e v e ls C o o re s p o n d to th e F iv e F re u d e n th a l- K a n to r T ri p le S y s te m s (K - F K T S ) R a n k s fo r 3 - Q u b it E n ta n g le m e n t        ­ €   ­  ‚ ƒ  ‚ € „   ™ ˆŠ ˆ  ‡­ ˆ —‡  —‹  ›ƒƒˆ ›ƒ ­ ƒ‹‡‘ƒ ˆ­¨™Š‡ ˆ ˆ­ ‰ ˆ­ EM-Theory was developed soley by Joseph Zalman Sheppard ©, 2012-2022.All Rights Reserved. EM-Theory Dyad Aspect-Seeing: EMA/EMB = Nonlinear Inner Eye/Scribe Metacognitive Conceptual Observer EM6/EM2 = Linear Inner Ear/Voice Cognitive Knowledge Reference Frame (Conceptualizations of Observer Independent Tensor Transitions (EMA/EMB) Dualistic Knowledge of Observer Dependent Complementarities (EM6/EM2) as Dyad Aspect-Seeing is the Primary Perspective of EM-Theory) ƒ„  „   ‚ †­ ‡­­ † ˆ‰Š €ƒ ‰  ‹ƒ„ ‰„ ‰ ‡ ‰ ‰ „ ‰ Šƒ ­ ‰ ‰ „ ‰ ‰­ ­   ‰Œ€Ž‘ ­ ‰ ‚ ’‰ƒ­Š‰ƒ ˆ „  ‚­   Šƒ ‰ ‚‡­ €Š  ‰‰ ˆ „ ‡‰ €­ ‰‰„‰ €Š  Š‹ ‰ ‰ƒƒ  Š Š€‰Œ„ ‚“  ƒˆ € ‡ ‘ ƒ• ‡­   ‚ƒ‘ƒ ˆ­™ ‡ — ‘ ‡‘¤• ‡®ƒ¤‰  ®’‡­ œ ‚ƒ ‘ ˆ ‚ƒ ‚ƒ   Œ Œ† ™ ˆ‹ ˆŒ† ™ ˆ‹ œ ƒ  ‚ ƒ ‰  ‚ƒ ƒ „‡ˆ  ƒˆ¨— ‘Œ†¨‚ƒ ƒ ‚   ™  ‰  ‰ ƒˆ € ƒ €„ † ‡ˆ ‡‰ ‡ Š ƒ ‹ ƒ €„ Œ  € † Ž‘ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ “ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ —€ ­ ’ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ —€ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ —€ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ † Ž‘ ­ ’ ‰˜™ ”  ˜š ˆ Žˆ ­ ‘  Œ‡ƒ‡ ­—ƒ ­ Œ  ‚‡ ­  ‹ ­  ‰‡­   Š ˆš ­  ‘† Žˆ ­‚‘‘®‚‘—‘­  ƒ‚‡ ­   Š ‘ŠŽˆ  ­ ‰‡ ­ ƒ œƒ ‡ ­ ‰‡­ ƒ †  ƒ „ Š ­–ƒ ‰ Œ‡ƒ­ ™Šˆ ƒ­ ˜    ’  ˜ ‚ ­ ­ šŽ ˜ ­ ­    „  ’   ˜ ­ ˜˜­   ’   €› ‹ – „  ‹ ‚€„  ­ ˜– ­ €„ œ Š ƒ ‚ š ­ ‚   € ­ ‚€„Ž €„ œ † ƒ ‚ š ­ ƒ œ  ‘ —Š ˆ­ ‘ —Š ‘ —Š ‘ —Š ™ ˆ   Žˆ ˆ ‚‡ ƒ ‚† ™ ˆ  ‘ ˆ „ Š ‚ƒ   ž ™ ˜  – ­ ™’   ˜  –   š ­  ­ ­ Ž  š ­ ƒ €­       ™ ™ ‰  ‡”ƒ ”ƒ •ˆ ƒˆ X X X X Ž ­ – Ÿ  ‚„ PHI PHI PHI –  ” Ž  ˜ €›­ ƒ  € ‚€„ˆ‡€„‰‡ €„†  †¡¡­   ­ ”  €¢    €¢  ˜ ƒŽ  Maimonides (1190) “ ‰” Ž Fast processes (System 1) include beliefs (EM2) that model sensory integrations like somatic schemas and exteroceptive navigational land- marks (EM10); or rationally accommodate or schematically update unexpected sensory feedback. Likewise, propositional attitudes (EM8) guide navigational path integrations that recontextualize perception and situational awareness (EM4) or accommodate social men- talizations (EM9) with effortful social reasoning. “Focused attention”and“open moni- toring”are two forms of mindfulness, and“tuning out”and“zoning out”are two forms of mind wandering. Rest- ing mindfulness may be depicted as the conscious decoupling of EM2 or EM8 with EM10 (sensations). Whereas dissociative mind-wandering may be depicted as the conscious decoupling of EM2 or EM8 with EM4 (perception). The intrapersonal circumplex and dual internal navigation illustration of EM-Core describe the two primary interpersonal characteristics of dominance and trust. Whereas the two primary internal navigation systems of path integration and landmark navigation are depicted diagonally. Depression may be more associated with a decou- pling of EM2 schema and EM10 sensory models, and anxiety may be more associated with resis- tance to perceived egocentric path integration. Core-affect describes a cirumplex of three hedonic drives (cognitive desire, liking, and incentive salience) orthogo- nally arranged with three types of arousal (power, reward, and affiliation). The three hedonic drives motivate three columns of EM-Core cognitive processing and the three arousal types mediate conscious contents as a fourth column of EMRed, EMGreen, EMBlue. The functional and task-driven EM-Core cognitive capacities are dissociable into four reportable voices, including an illocutionary (reinforcement learning)“actor”that is intentionally reportable (EM3), a logical justification or“critic”voice that reports epistemic feelings and epistemic judgments (EM5), an allomaternal voice that interprets emotional experiences and feelings of attachment (EM7), and reportable mind wandering that integrates visual and auditory mental imagery into dream-like episodic memories (EM9). Emotional empathy interprets syntactic meaning from three types of arousal that mediate consciousness (intrinsic information), and cognitive empathy intelligently applies syntactic meaning through skilled behaviour (extrinsic information). Cognitive empathy outputs as three temporal dynamics; (a) crystal intelligence as conceptual coherence (atemporal), (b) co-authored autobiographical or episodic scenes (temporally extended), and (c) fluid intelligence as somatically applied novel skill (the present moment). Internal MERGE is indexed according to dominance-subordina- tion dynamics external MERGE is paired according to affiliation relations. The four reportable error voices are perseverative versions of the four reportable task-focused voices of EM-Core (EM3 reportable intentions, EM5 reportable feelings of knowing, EM7 reportable emotions, and EM9 reportable dreams hallucinations). The remaining four elements surrounding EM6 are the corner elements that provide latent source signals (like moments in a quadrupole) that synergize into reportable elements. These corner elements include EM2 functional identity schemas, EM4 situational aware- ness perception, EM8 interoceptive somatic markers attitudinal propositions, and EM10 sensory integrations instinctual urges. Personality variations are indicative of elements that self-gener- ate neural signals within individual EM-Core elements. Typically allomaternal personality is situated on EM7, yet alternative element-recursing personality constructs may self-generate from any element with different characteristics. Each element is internally incomplete due to Gödel’s Incompleteness Theorems. The four reportable voices of EM-Core may be viewed as each clustering to five other EM-Core elements. EM3 represents five categories of intentional speech acts associated with a hybridization of semantic and procedural memory that directs kine- matics and assertoric, or illocutionary, force. EM5 epistemic logical justifications, feelings of knowing, confidence judgments, heuris- tic judgments, and intuitions are mediated by epistemic secondary reward weighting. EM5 is primarily categorized according to five types of logical justification. Logical justifications are typically used to rational- ize EM3 actions expressed as illocutionary force mediated by game theory. EM5 has five phase transitions: (1) Machiavellian strategies, (2) task regulation, (3) logical justifications the resting mind, (4) perse- verative feedback, (5) schizoid avoidance. EM7 emotion-mediated personality is categorized by the Big Five personality traits. EM7 is grounded in the allomaternal circuit and mediates secure, avoidant, disorganized, anxious-ambivalent attachment styles. EM9 language pragmatics and counter- factual scene gestalt capacities are cate- gorized according to five types of gestalt integrations, as episodic coherence, and as categories of language pragmatics (excluding speech acts) that contextual- ize the meaning of spoken language according to the regulation of exterocep- tive and interoceptive signals including prosody, nonverbal communication, implicature, and contextual relevance. EM9 expresses spontaneous cognitions, and EM3 expresses deliberate cognitions. Chiral EM5 (mirror image) doxological or epistemic personality is categorized as an epistemic version of the Big Five personality traits. The chiral version of the Big Five personality traits is indica- tive of the core traits associated with Broad Autism Phenotype (BAP), Autism, and Autism Savant Syndrome, depending on the EM5 chiral phase transitions of the epistemic personali- ty in a similar pattern to non-chiral EM5 phase-transitions. The“I”and“Me” distinction is from William James. The PsychoEducation Tensor (PET)® is a diamond-shaped skew-hermitian 4x4 tensor transformational matrix describing 16 elementary brain processes. The PET divides into a 7-element metacognitive component called EM-Path, repre- sented by colours and letters, and a 9-element cognitive component called EM-Core, represented by numbers. The PET® describes a set of Vygotski- an-like elementary mental processes that consti- tute an integrated model of cognitive architecture. The organization of the elements is consistent with the scientific literature on mind wandering and spontaneous cognitive processes. The PET® was designed as a psychoeducational tool to help reduce psychological distress and mental perplexi- ty. The PET® further integrates with dual comple- mentary classical and quantum models of physics. Moreover, the PET® interfaces with dual physical stimuli environments and socially constructed propositional narratives. The PET® may also serve as a minimalist program for cognitive architecture. EM-Theory claims that conceptual and knowledge consciousnesses are chiral and complementarity. ©, 2021(Reg. #1193277) The PsychoEducation Tensor (PET)® describes a set of 16 cognitive systems that combine Baars’(2015) division of 13 primary cognitive systems with Trofimova and Robbins’(2016) division of 3 primary arousal systems. Within the 4x4 PET, a 3x3 cognitive architecture called EM-Core (EM2-EM10) can morph between five phase-transitions, and may further optimize, or self-sandbox, according to the Five Principles of APA Ethics. Metacognitive training may facilitate acquiring an internal working model (Bowlby) of the PET as a theraputic memory palace. Baars, B. J. (2015). Consciousness - , (8):2207. Sheppard, J. Z. (2021). [Masters of Science Thesis, University of Victoria]. (Provides a more in-depth account of EM-Theory) Trofimova, I., Robbins, T. W. (2016). Temperament and arousal systems: a new synthesis of differential psychology and functional neurochemistry. , 64, 382-402. Developmental inner-voice speech includes social speech, private speech, and inner speech (Vygotsky). Face expression mediates human communication with variations in affect, informational contexts, and cultural cues. EM-Theory subdivides four primary categories of metacognition into a 4x4 grid of subscale capacities. ‚‡    ­ € ­ ‚ ƒ„  † ­   ‡ˆ ­ ‰  ƒŠ ‹ ­    ‡  ‡   ‡ ‰‡   ‡  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡ ‘ Ž† ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡  Ž† ‡­  ‡ Ž† ‡  ƒŽ† ‡­  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ‡­  ‡ Œ‡ƒ ƒ‡­  ‡ €   ‡­  ‡ €  ‡  ‡­  ‡ €   ‡­  ‡ Œ  ‡ˆ­ ‡ ‡’ ­ Œ† ‡ ‡ ƒ“‡­ ‡ ‡ ­ ‘ Œ ‚ ” ƒ  ‡ ˆ ˆ  ‡Ž†‡  ‡ ‰‡  ‡  ˆ  ‡ ‡  ‡‹  ‡‚ ˆ  ‡  ƒˆ  ‡ ˆƒ •‡ˆ ’ ‡ˆ € ƒ ’ ‡ˆ ‘  ’ ‡ˆ  ƒ ’ ‡ˆ ƒŠ  ‡Œ„ƒ    ƒ ˆ ‡  ˆ   ­ €  Œ•Œ† ‰  ­   ˆ ‡    ­ ‚   Œ ˆ•‡ ­ ‰  Œ•–ƒ„ƒ ­  Œ•ˆ ­ Œ‡ƒ‡ ˆŠ —ˆ ƒ ƒ­ ƒ‚† ˆ ‡ „ˆ‡“  ƒ ˆ ‰‡ ˆ ‡ ‚ ˆ —ƒˆ­ Œ†    ƒŠ˜ ‰ ­ ˆ    ™Š˜ ‰ ­ Œ‡ƒ‡ ˆ  Œ‡ƒ‚‡ ‚  Œ Š‡ ‚ ‰ •‡Œ ˆ Narrative Ethnosphere Physical Environment  ƒ ƒ š ›ƒ ˆ ›ƒ  ›ƒ ‘† ›ƒ ‡ ›ƒ ˆ ›ƒ  œƒ ƒ œƒ ƒ œƒ   ”ƒ ž ’Ÿ ’   ž¡ ’¡Ÿ ’¡ ˆƒˆ ‘    ‡ ‘ ˆƒˆ ‘ ˆƒˆ ‘ ‡„ƒ€ ‡„ƒ€ ‡„ƒ€ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ††•‡ ‡ ˆ‚ˆ ‘ Ÿ ˆ‡ ­ ‘ ‡ ˆ ¢£¡­ †† ˆƒ •‡ ­  ˆŠ ˆ  Šœƒ ‘ ƒ —ˆ­ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ ˆ ¤­ ‘œ‚  ­ ” ‚ ƒ Œ ‘  ƒ ­® ‰ Š ƒ ƒ  œ  ‡ ƒ   €  ‰  ƒ‡  ‡ ‰ – ‚ˆ ƒ ‚ƒ ‡ —ƒ  ‰‡  † ‚ƒ Œ† ‚ƒ ‚“ ‚ƒ š’ƒ   ˆˆ ‰›ƒƒˆ‰ˆ € ™ ˆ —‡   ‘ƒŒ ¤—¤„‡¤ £¤­ ›ƒ‡‡¡­‘ƒŠ ˆ € † ˆˆ ‡ ‡ˆ ¤¤‘ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ‘’ ‚‰”‚‡”‡™ƒ¤¥Œ ¤£¤­ ? ­ £ ˆ ‡ ©¤¦ žˆ ¤ ›ƒƒˆ’ƒ ­ Œ ˆ­  ‡ ­ ¬¬­ ƒ ƒƒ ­ ‚ ‰‡ ­ ’ ‡ˆ­           ’  ˆ ˆ ˆ­    ­ €‚ ‚ ƒ  „ † „ƒ† ˆ ˆ ‡ ˆ €‡ †  ‡† ‰‡ † ‡ ‰†Šˆ•‹‘ ‡ Šˆ• ‘ „‡–†—Œ‡–­Ž— €‚    Œ ˆ •‡‚‡ ˆƒ ˆ ‡  ‡•‡ ‘ ˆ  ‹ „ † ˆ •‡ƒ‡ „ ƒ­ ƒ  •‡   Š€ «‰‚‰¬ •‡­ ¡­„ §ƒ    ˆ ‡ƒ ƒŸ ¨ˆƒˆ„ƒ€ †­Ž‘ –”© ¡‰ ˆ  ˆ ™œ ‡ ‡­ ‡ˆ† ‡ƒ¤œ‘ Š¤„™Š”š’ƒ £‘ ƒ ˆ ˆ š’ƒ ”© ¡‰ ˆ  ˆ‚ œ‡ £ „’ „ ‚‚  ƒ  •‡‚‰ Š€­ ‚– ŒŠ  ƒ ­ ª œˆ ª„  Œ Š ª‰‡ ª¦ƒ ªŒ   ¡Œ‡  ‘‡ƒƒ‰ ƒ­ š Š Œ† ’‡ ‡  œˆ — ‚ƒ ™­ „ Œ Š  ƒ‚‡‚ ƒŠ­ ‰‡  ˆ„‚ ƒ ­ ¦ƒ  ‰ ƒ­ Œ  ¡ Œ‡  ‘‡ ‰– ‚ ƒŠ­  ˆ œ  „•‚ˆ­ „ ˆ‰ˆ ­  ‰‘Š­  € ‰–   ˆ­ „”ˆ ‚ Š¦ ¦š ‚ƒ«ƒ ¬  „ ‡ƒ—‰ ‚    ‰ ‰ƒˆ ‰ ‚ƒ „ƒƒ‚   ƒ‰‰ ’ ‡ ˆ  ‰ ™Š˜  Œ ‡ •  ­ ‡‡‡š‡ Œ ¡  Œ — œ‡‡™Š˜   ‡ ‡ Œ Š ­ ƒ‹ œ•‡„Œ ‚  ƒ­ ¦ƒ­ šˆ ­ ˆ «‰¬ ˆ ¦ƒ ‡ˆ„ •‡ ¦ƒ  ¦ƒ  ‰ˆ‡ ¦ƒ   ¦ƒ  ‰ ¦ƒ  ˆ ¦ƒ  ˆ Œ† ’‡ ‡ ˆ Œ† ’‡ ‡ ¦ƒ ‡ˆ —ƒ  Œ† ’‡ ‡­  ‘‘­ ‹ ‘ š ¦ƒ ˆ ­ œ ˆ‘ ™‰­ ™‘‘ ™Š ™ ­ ‹ ‘ ™­ ‘ –Š’ Œ  ®­ ‘ ‘ š   ­ ™‘‘ ˆ ƒ ™ ­  ‘ ™ —ƒ ­ ‘ –ˆ ‘ — ‘­  ƒŠ˜  „™ ˆ ­ ‚ ‘­  ƒŠ˜ „‡ ­ ‚ ‘­  ƒŠ˜ „‡ ­  ˆ ­«¬ ‚¤‚ƒˆ¤‚ƒ  ˆ ™  ˆ ™ •‡ ¦ƒ‡  š ‡ ‰­ ‘‡Š Œ‡ ˆŠ ” ˆ  Œ ­ œƒ ˆ „ ˆ š ­ ƒ – ‹ ˆ ‰ ­ ‰ €  š  † ˆ ™ ­ ™ ‘‡ ‚ƒˆ­ ‰€Š ‚  —  ƒ­ ‘‡ ‚ƒˆ­ ˆ  • ˆ‹‡ •  ˆ ‚ƒˆ­ The Dark Triad of grandiose narcissism, Machiavellianism (Five-Factor Model), and psychopathy (hypo-allomaternal orientation), or type-A personality (hyper-allomaternal orientation) further emerge as compet- itive reward-seeking dominates EM-Core behaviours. Five phase-transi- tions of EM-Core correspond to five expressions of EM5 supervised learning, from over-amalgamated columns to fragmented elements. ‰ ƒ  ‡ ‚ † ‚ „ €  ˆ­ ‚  ‚­ ‘  ‘  €   ˆ „‡­ ˆˆ  ‡ ‘ ˆ ‚‡‡  ‘ ‚‡‡ ˆ ˆ •€  ƒ ˆ™Š˜  Œ ‡ ƒ ƒ ‰ˆ‡ ˆ  ˆ ƒ ‰™Š˜  ‘ ‚­ œ‡Œ ‰™Š˜  Œ ‡  ƒ ‚­ ˆŠ ‡ ‚“ ˆ„ Š „ ƒ ‚­ ‚  • ˆ œ  ‡    ® ƒ† ‚“ •® Š ‚“ ƒ «‰¬ƒŠ­® „ƒ  ‘ˆ ƒ « ƒ¬ƒŠ­® „ƒ  ƒŠ  ˆ  ‚‡‚­ ‡    ‰  ‡  œ  ‡   ‚­ «™‡¬ «‚‡¬­ «€ ƒ‡¬ ‚†­ ‚–‡ ­ –ƒ ‚­ ‚† ˆ ˆ „‡Ž†‡« ‚¬¦ƒ­ ” œ ˆ ™ƒ  ™ † – •‡ ¦ƒ ­ š    ™   ‚ Š­ ” ‰ – ›ƒ®—  €ƒ ƒ ƒŒ­  „ ˆ Œ‡  „‚‡ ƒ ‚†  „«‚“ ¬ ™Š˜ ¤ ¤ «’ ‚¬ˆ  ”Š’ —ƒŠ ƒ­  ƒŠ˜ ™ ˆ ­ ‚‡ˆ­  ƒŠ˜ „‡ ­ ‚‡ ­  ƒŠ˜ „‡ ­ „„  ¤¤ ‘  ˆ ­ Œ Š– Œ Š ˆ „‡ Œ‰ƒ­ Œ Š Žˆ ‰  ƒ   ­ Œ Š ƒ  ˆ ˆƒ  ­ Œ Š –ƒ ‚ƒ  ‰ˆ‡ ‚ƒ ‡ ­     •Š¡«‚  Œ˜ ¬– ƒ ŒŒ Š­  ‰ ƒ™ƒ ƒ   ­  €­ ‚­ ””ˆˆ ‰Œ” — ­ ‰ €‡­ €Œ” ‚“ ‚ ­ ‰Œ” — ‰ € ­ €Œ” ‚“ ‚ ­ Œ ƒ ” € ‘ ‰­ ‚ œ • € „ƒ ƒ Šˆ ‡ ‘ ™ƒ ƒ ‰‡   ­ ‡ˆ  –ƒ€ ­ Œ ” ƒ ‰ ƒ ‡ ‚ƒ ƒ ‡ ƒ‡ Œ ƒ ‰ ‚®„ƒ ‡­ ˆˆ  ‚ƒˆ ‰ ­ ’ •œ  ­ ’ œ•  ­ ’ˆ ’ ’ ™Š˜  „ƒ ‚‡ˆ ƒŠ˜  „ƒ ‚‡ˆ  ˆ ¤­ ‚ƒˆ  ƒ‡  Œƒˆ ­  ‡ ‘ ’ œ‡ ‘ ‚ €    ‰  ‡  Œ  ‘ ˆ  ‘ ƒ ‡  ˆ ‰  ‡   „ Š  ™ƒ ˆ š   ’­ ž‡™ƒ ’ ‡ •–‡ ­ „ Š Œ  ’‚ƒ • Œ ˆ š  ‡Œƒˆ­ ˆƒ‘  • ƒ­     ‡ˆ ” ””ƒ ‡ •‡ƒ‡‡ˆ ‰   ‡ œƒ ‡ Œ  ­ €   ‡ €ˆ „  ‚‡ˆ „‡ƒ®” ­ ƒ „‡ƒ ¦ƒ  ˆ ‰ˆ­ ˆ „‡ƒ ˆ­ „‡ƒ®”ƒ  ­ Žˆ ‘Š ƒ‘ ­ ˆ ƒƒƒ­ ƒˆˆ„ Žˆ ”ƒ ‡­ Ž† ‡ ‰‡  ƒ ‰‡ –ƒ ˆˆ­ •‡ˆˆ­ –Š ˆˆ­ ‰ ˆ­  ˆ­  ˆ ­ ” ‚ ƒ Œ ‘ ® „ ƒ ‚     „ ‚ ­ ‘ ƒ  š  ‡ ­  † ­ ƒ‡™ƒ™­ ‘ ƒ ™ ‡™­ ‘ ƒ ž‡™ƒž™­‘ ƒ ‰  ‡ •  ˆ € ƒ ‚ƒ ™  †« ˆ¬ ˆ† ¡ ­  ’ ‡ ‰‡ ‡  ‡ ™­ €   ™ ­ € ž™­ € „‚­€  ’ ‡­  Œ ­  ƒ‘ ­ ”ˆ §ƒŠ ­ ‘ ƒ ‘ Š¥ ‘ ƒ ‘ Š ‚ˆ ˆ  Œ Œ ˆ Œƒ  ­Œ‡ƒ ˆ  Œ ­ „ƒ ‡­ ‚ƒ † ‘ ƒ ‚ƒ † ‘ ƒ  ƒ‘ œ‡ –ƒ   ­ ” ¤  ¤ ‚ƒ   ‡Œ ­ – ‘ œ‡ Œ†  ™ ˆ‹ ˆ Œ† œ‡ € ƒ­ ž¨ ‘š†­ ˆ‘ˆ‰ˆ‡ ƒ“­ ™¨–ƒ «‘  ¬™Š ­•Žˆ ‡­ „‚¨Œ‡  ‚‡  ­  Œ Š  ƒ­ ™¨– ”ƒ œ‡­   ƒŒ ˆˆ‚†‰­  ‘ ƒ ‡ ‡ ‘‡ ‡ EM-Core includes five phase transition configura- tions from high to low internal elemental integra- tion. The five EM-Core levels correspond to four large-scale brain networks including the CEN (1st 5th), the DAN (2nd), the DMN (3rd), and the VAN (SN) (2nd). For example, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of the CEN is implicated in either deliberate on-task contextual decision-making when engaged in task processing (DAN), or spontaneous off-task contextual mind wandering when engaged with personal saliences (VAN/SN). M e n t a l S e t - S h i f t i n g C o g n i t i v e E m p a t h y ( T r a n s l a t e s M e a n i n g i n t o P r o b l e m S o l v i n g ) E m o t i o n a l E m p a t h y ( T r a n s c r i b e s M e a n i n g f r o m A r o u s a l ) E m p a t h i c R e s o n a n c e ‚Š  Œ Š ˆ ¤ ’ ‡ˆ¤  ‡ ‰‡ ­ Œ ‰ˆˆ  ‚ƒŠ‡ –Š ’ ‡ˆ­ œ £™  ‚‡ ¤‰ ™Š˜ Œ ‡¤ € ’ ‡ ˆ­ €  „ ™ ‚ƒ œ ­ ‚  € ƒ –‡ ‚ƒ ‘ ˆ­ ‘ ‰‡ ‚ƒ  ­ Œ Š ‰  ¤ ‚‡ ¤ ”ˆ ¤ Žˆ ­   ™Š˜ Œ ‡¤ ƒ‚†¤ ‡ ¤  ƒ ˆ­ Œ Š ˆ  ‚ˆ ƒ­ ‰  „‡ € ˆ ‚ƒ ¤ ˆ „‡¤ ˆ ­ Œ Š ‘ˆ–ƒ ‰ˆ‡–ƒ‚ƒ  ‰ˆ‡¤—ƒ ¤ ’ ‡¤ ”­ S e n s e Sense M eaning M e a n i n g R e f e r e n c e R e f e r e n c e K i n e t i c A r o u s a l A f fi l i a t e A r o u s a l T a s k S e t - S h i f t i n g ‚ ‘ Œ ” ƒ Œ Š „‡Ž†‡  ¦ƒ ‡ˆ¤ •‡ ¦ƒ ¤  ƒ‡ ­ ‰ ‰– ‰¤ ”Š —ƒŠ¤ •‡ƒ‡„ ƒ † ‡­ I n v a r i a n t O b j e c t S e t - S h i f t i n g  „‡ „ ‡ ‰‰ Š¤ –ƒ’ ‡ˆ­ ‚  ­ €  Šƒ ™ ’  ˆ  ˆ ˆ­ ® €    ‰‡¤ ˆŠ ‡¤ ƒ ƒ­ J o s e p h Z a l m a n S h e p p a r d , 2 0 2 2 ‰    ƒ      ­ ® E p i s t e m i c C o l u m n E p i s o d i c C o l u m n E m b o d i e d C o l u m n ‡   ‘ • ‡ E m p a t h i c C o l u m n ˆŠ «¬ ¤‚ƒˆ¤‚ ˆ  ™  ‡–­ ‚‡Š • ¦ƒ ­ œƒ ˆ • ’ ‰‡­ ‡„   ƒ  ‡‰­ ‰ € • ƒ ‰  ­ ‚ƒˆ ‚€ƒ‚ˆŠ ‘‡ ‘‡ ‚€ƒ‚ˆŠ ‚  ƒ‚ ˆ ˆ ˆŠ ˆ ‡ ˆ ‚ƒ ‘  „ ‡    ™ Š ˜  ­ Œ ‡ „ ­ ‚ ˆ  ‡   ˆ ™ Š ˜  ‚ „ „ ‰ „ ‰ˆ‡ ‚ ‘ˆ‡ „ ‹  ­Œ‡ ‚ ƒ‹ „¨“ƒ‚ ˆˆ ‚¨ƒ‚ˆ Œ Š ‰  ƒ ˆƒ Œ Š ˆ Œ Š ‘ˆ Œ Š „‡ Ž†‡ €   €   ‰  „‡  ‡ ‘ R e c o h e r e n c e P H I ( I n t r i n s i c I n f o r m a t i o n ) (I n te g ra te d In fo rm a ti o n T h e o ry ) ›ƒƒˆ ™Š ›ƒƒˆˆ ƒ‡ Œš †­ ›ƒƒˆ  ƒ  šŽ†Ž† ‡™­ ›ƒƒˆ ˆ ƒ Ž† ˆ‡  š † ˆ­ ›ƒƒˆ š š † ˆ ˆ‡  Ž†„ ™Š­ ›ƒƒˆ ‰ˆ œ‡œ‘‡  ˆ­ ›ƒƒˆ ˆˆƒ   ‡ ­ ›ƒƒˆ ‡ˆ  • ‹­ D e c o h e r e n c e ( E x t r i n s i c I n f o r m a t i o n ) ‚ ‘ Œ ” ƒ  ›ƒ  (Consciousness as 9th Hybrid State) P H I P H I ›ƒ  Q u b i t # 2 (T w o S ta te s O n e H y b ri d ) Q u b i t # 3 Q u b i t # 1 (e .g ., E M 4 E M 1 0 + E M 7 S in g le 8 - S ta te Q u d it (E M 2 - E M 1 0 R o ta ti n g A ro u n d H y b ri d E M 6 ) E n c o d e s T h re e Q u b it s Q u a n t u m C o m p u t a t i o n a l C o m p l e m e n t a r i t y P E T T e n s o r ® 1 s t L e v e l E M - C o re A c ts a s T h re e Q u b it s 5 th L e v e l E M - C o re A c ts a s O n e 8 - S ta te Q u d it T h e 5 E M - C o re L e v e ls C o o re s p o n d to th e F iv e F re u d e n th a l- K a n to r T ri p le S y s te m s (K - F K T S ) R a n k s fo r 3 - Q u b it E n ta n g le m e n t        ­ €   ­  ‚ ƒ  ‚ € „   ™ ˆŠ ˆ  ‡­ ˆ —‡  —‹  ›ƒƒˆ ›ƒ ­ ƒ‹‡‘ƒ ˆ­¨™Š‡ ˆ ˆ­ ‰ ˆ­ ‚ ›ƒƒˆ™Š‘ ‚‘   ’ƒ ‰‘  † ˆ‡ ¨—‡ EM-Theory and the PsychoEducation Tensor were Developed by Joseph Zalman Sheppard ©, 2012-2022.All Rights Reserved. EM-Theory Dyad Aspect-Seeing: EMA/EMB = Nonlinear Inner Eye/Scribe (Reading Writing) Metacognitive Conceptual Observer. EM6/EM2 = Linear Inner Ear/Voice (Hearing Speaking) Cognitive Knowledge Reference Frame. (Conceptualizations of Observer Independent Tensor Transitions (EMA/EMB) Dualistic Knowledge of Observer Dependent Complementarities (EM6/EM2) as Dyad Aspect-Seeing (Scientific Theory-Data Seeing) is a Primary Perspective of EM-Theory) ƒ„  „   ‚ †­ ‡­­ † ˆ‰Š €ƒ ‰  ‹ƒ„ ‰„ ‰ ‡ ‰ ‰ „ ‰ Šƒ ­ ‰ ‰ „ ‰ ‰­ ­   ‰Œ€Ž‘ ­ ‰ ‚ ’‰ƒ­Š‰ƒ ˆ „  ‚­   Šƒ ‰ ‚‡­ €Š  ‰‰ ˆ „ ‡‰ €­ ‰‰„‰ €Š  Š‹ ‰ ‰ƒƒ  Š Š€‰Œ„ ‚“  ƒˆ € ‡ ‘ ƒ• ‡­ ‘Š ƒ   ‚ƒ‘ƒ ˆ­™ ‡ — ‘ ‡‘¤• ‡®ƒ¤‰  ®’‡­ œ ‚ƒ ‘ ˆ ‚ƒ ‚ƒ   Œ Œ† ™ ˆ‹ ˆŒ† ™ ˆ‹ œ ƒ  ‚ ƒ ‰  ‚ƒ ƒ „‡ˆ  ƒˆ¨— ‘Œ†¨‚ƒ ƒ ƒ ‚   ™   ‡—ˆ‡‡­ ‰  ‰ ƒˆ € ƒ €„ † ‡ˆ ‡‰ ‡ Š ƒ ‹ ƒ €„ Œ  € † Ž‘ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ “ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ —€ ­ ’ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ ‰ ”Ž•€ ­ – ’ —€ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ —€ ­ ’ ˆ Ž‘‡‘Ž‡Ž‘€ ‘­ † Ž‘ ­ ’ ‰˜™ ”  ˜š ˆ Žˆ ­ ‘  Œ‡ƒ‡ ­—ƒ ­ Œ  ‚‡ ­  ‹ ­  ‰‡­   Š ˆš ­  ‘† Žˆ ­‚‘‘®‚‘—‘­  ƒ‚‡ ­   Š ‘ŠŽˆ  ­ ‰‡ ­ ƒ œƒ ‡ ­ ‰‡­ ƒ †  ƒ „ Š ­–ƒ ‰ Œ‡ƒ­ ™Šˆ ƒ­ ˜    ’  ˜ ‚ ­ ­ šŽ ˜ ­ ­    „  ’   ˜ ­ ˜˜­   ’   €› ‹ – „  ‹ ‚€„  ­ ˜– ­ €„ œ Š ƒ ‚ š ­ ‚   € ­ ‚€„Ž €„ œ † ƒ ‚ š ­ ƒ œ  ‘ —Š ˆ­ ‘ —Š ‘ —Š ‘ —Š ™ ˆ   Žˆ ˆ ‚‡ ƒ ‚† ™ ˆ  ‘ ˆ „ Š ‚ƒ   ž ™ ˜  – ­ ™’   ˜  –   š ­  ­ ­ Ž  š ­ ƒ €­       ™ ™ ‰  ‡”ƒ ”ƒ •ˆ ƒˆ X X X X Ž ­ – Ÿ  ‚„ PHI PHI PHI –  ” Ž  ˜ €›­ ƒ  €„ž€ €„ˆ‡€„‰‡ €„†  †¡¡­   ­ ”£  €¢   £ €¢  ˜ £ƒŽ  Maimonides (1190) “ ‰” Ž ‡ ‘‡ ¤ ¤ “ „   ‚ ‰“”• ‰“• €   „    €  ‹   Ž   ‚ “ ¤ ”© “ ¤ ¥—    ­    € ›  ˜  ’ ‡˜  ‡  ­  ‡   ‡ ‡‘ ‡ ˜ ‡ €› ­  ‚   ­ ¥ € „ Ž   ­  ‹ ™    ­  “ ’ ‰‡ ™Š†  «„™Š¤¬™Š‡‡ ™Š † „’¬€œ ¬­ „¦ ƒ   ƒœ‘ œ ‡ˆ­ ‡‘“ Œ†   ¤Œ‡¤ ­ ‰ “• ‰ “”• „ ‰ „ ’€„ „ ’€„‘ „ ’€„‘ „ ’€„ ‚ˆ  ‡ ‚ ­ ‚ —ƒˆ ™ ‡ƒ Dedicated to the Anomaly of Singular Oneness ‹ ™  €  ­ ‹  €  ­ Ž€›­ § —¤Ž  ™ ­ ­¥ Ž€›­ „ ˜  —  € ¥ ‹ ‹ — „   Ž   ‡¨ ’’ ¥˜ Ž  Ž  ‡¨ ƒŽ ¥‘ ¥€ ©  ‡¨ „ „  — ¥€ š ‘ ˜ ‡¨ Ž­­  € › ¥€      ’ € ª˜ “€   ‘ € ¥ — –  € ¥ €  €  €­ “­ œ š­ €  ‡€„ ˜ š   ¥ €  ”  € ­ €  ” ‹ « –  ’  ŽŽ€ ¥ ‡ ”ˆ ­

×