Mindful, Authentic Advising. Will it help you and
your students be more successful?
Seek & you shall find

Process Model for Student
Completion
Define academic advising
Identify best practices & discuss
var...
CAS ~ Habley
 Advising bears the distinction of being the only

structured activity on campus in which all students
have ...
Concept of Academic Advising
Academic advising, based in the teaching and
learning mission of higher education,
is a serie...
Define…
 “Academic advisors help students become members

of their higher education community, think critically
about the...
Influential Research Articles / Books
 Bean, J. P., & Eaton, S. (2000). Part I: Revising Tinto's

Theory: A Psychological...
Advising & Leading
Josephson (1988) argues that ethical academic advising is based
on similar relationships characterized ...
WCCC Process Model for Student Completion
PURPOSE:

To implement an admissions, intake, advising
and registration process ...
Process Model for Student Completion
Stage 2: Advancing to Degree Status
Cohort:
Goal:

Providers:
Process:

Note:

All pr...
Process Model for Student Completion
Stage 3: Degree Status
Cohort:
Goal:
Providers:
Process:

COMPLETION TARGET:

All stu...
2003 NACADA Certification Task Force
 Recommends that advisor training should address
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three areas:
Conceptual: W...
Advising Skills Required - NACADA
 Advisors must communicate and engage students via

skills in:
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Interpersonal r...
Core values of academic advising - NACADA
Core values of academic advising - NACADA
 1) Advisors are responsible to the individuals they
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advise.
2) Ad...
NACADA
 NACADA’s new book:
 Academic Advising Approaches:

Strategies that teach students to make
the most of college
 ...
Chapters in Academic Advising Approaches
 Motivational Interviewing
 Appreciative Advising
 Strengths-Based Advising
 ...
Advising Learning Outcomes
 However, a representative sample of learning outcomes for advising
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indica...
And yet another way to relate to students
 Authentic Advising
 Authentic Leadership
 Emotional Intelligence
 Mindfulne...
Authentic Advising:
When one endeavors to skillfully
apply mindfulness practices to
enhance their emotional
intelligence, ...
Mindfulness
 15,200,000 hits on

Google
 99,500 articles
Google Scholar
 6,987 books in
Amazon
 Effect of Meditation
o...
Mindfulness Definition

Paying attention in a particular
way, on purpose, in the present
moment, and nonjudgmentally.
Kaba...
Mindfulness Benefits
 Mindfulness improves well being
 Mindfulness improves physical health
 Mindfulness improves menta...
Emotional Intelligence
 Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer-

They define emotional intelligence as: The
ability to monitor o...
Authentic Leadership Self-Assessment Questionnaire
Instructions: This questionnaire contains items about different dimensi...
SIY at www.siyli.org
Be Authentic
Leaders all over the planet are
beginning to understand the
benefits of purposefully
learning to be more attentive
and foc...
Emotional intelligence competencies

Social
Skills

Empathy
Motivation
Self-Regulation

Self-Awareness
Dimensions of Emotional Intelligence
1. Self-awareness: Knowledge of one’s internal
states, preferences, resources, and
in...
Yes, very nice, but what can emotional
intelligence do for me?

Stellar work performance
Outstanding leadership
Ability to...
Most cited job skills in academic advising
Interpersonal skills
Teaching skills or excellent skills in public speaking
Coo...
Emotional Intelligence is Trainable
Examples
 Response to triggers
 Difficult conversations
 Confidence during stress
Neuroplasticity
 Old School Belief -Can’t teach an old dog new

tricks…
 Today we know differently
Attention
 What we pay attention to changes the brain
 Intention
 Attitude
 Attention
Mindfulness is Excellent Education
 William James, the father of modern

psychology, had this to say:
And the faculty of ...
Attention
 What we pay attention to changes the brain
 Intention
 Attention
 Attitude
http://www.mindfulness-matters.org/what-is-mindfulness/
Amygdala
Amygdala
 Emotion is a basic physiological state characterized

by identifiable autonomic or bodily changes.
-Laura Delizonna via ...
Body Language
Why bring mindfulness to the body?
 Correlates of emotion in the body are much more

vivid than those in the brain.
Psychoneuroimmunology
DOPAMINE
NEUROPEPTIDES
Applications and Benefits
 Pause, notice thoughts and emotions
 Mindfulness in daily activities
 Recover from distracti...
When?
Self-awareness, self-regulation,
and self-transcendence (SART): a framework for
understanding the
neurobiological mechanis...
Scientific Definition of Meditation
 Meditation refers to a family of mental training

practices that are designed to fam...
Learning meditation is like …learning to ride bike
Mind like snow globe

Serenity:
stillness, calmness, peace
Mindfulness: clarity alertness
Happiness
self-awareness

internalized moral perspective - base their actions on their values
balanced processing

exhibit genuine l...
The effective interaction between advisor and student is
very important to the individual growth and success of
students (...
Mindfulness

Emotional
Intelligence

Authentic Advising
Authentic
Advising

Mindfulness

Emotional
Intelligence

Authentic
Leadership
Back to mindfulness
“What you focus on you become. So
always focus on the highest, brightest,
happiest and most noble of a...
MINDFULNESS IS A
MIRROR OF WHAT’S
HAPPENING IN THE
PRESENT MOMENT
The Mindful Child by Susan Kaiser Greenland
BELIEVE
THERE IS
GOOD IN
THE WORLD
Thank you!

Joseph Croskey
josephcroskey@gmail.com
814-673-3686
Controversy
 What religion is it?
 Is it just googley moogley?
 Is it just good for me personally?
 I’m not stressed w...
Trying a Short Mindfulness Meditation
Your capacity to be mindful is most powerfully developed through mindfulness
meditat...
References
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George, B. (2010). True north: Discover your authentic leadership (Vol. 143). Wiley. com....
Suggested Reading / References
 Davidson, R. J., & Begley, S. (2012). The emotional life of your brain: How

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More References
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Astin, A.W. (1999). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education....
Online References
 http://www.siyli.org/
 http://www.contemplativemind.org/programs/acmhe

 http://www.mindfuled.org/
...
Practices
Change Anything: The new science of personal success. By Kerry Patterson, (2011).

CHANGE
ANYTHING

Motivation

Ability

P...
http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Mindfulness-Meditation-by-Jon-Kabat-Zinn

Jon Kabat-Zinn's guide on how to start a meditation ...
ALQ
To obtain this instrument, contact Mind Garden Inc., www.mindgarden.com

Authentic Leadership Self-Assessment Question...
Emotional intelligence model
Who I am

Personal
Competency

What I do

Self Awareness
Vision
Values
Beliefs

Social Compet...
When?
“To study the Way is to study the self. To study the self is to
forget the self. To forget the self is to be enlightened b...
Authentic Leaders:
•
•
•
•

exhibit genuine leadership
lead from conviction
original, not copies
base their actions on the...
http://www.mindfulness-matters.org/what-is-mindfulness/
The Surprising Source of Great Results: Attention and Mindfulness
http://www.ormsby.at/en/attention-mindfulness-results/
Self
Others

Context

Emotional Intelligence
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
WCCC advising presentation draft
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NACADA Principles, Authentic Advising, Process Model

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  • Good Morning WCCC Thank you, I’m so grateful you are here with us today. My name is J C. I work at CUP as the advisor/ academic counselor for our TRIO UB program. Prior to this I was director of advising, online, undecided, at-risk, & of course everyone else who walked through the door. – If you’re here for this welcome back training that means we’re in the right place & time, fully present right now. "Sawubona. Sikhona"This is a South African expression that means: "Greetings. I see you. I am here. Until you see me I do not exist. When you see me, you bring me into existence." A person is a person because of other peopleCan a leader be a leader w/o other people?Emotional intelligence & mindfulnessPractices to help you grow into the leader (advisor) you are to be…Mindful, Authentic Advising: Will it Help You and Your Students be More Successful?146Joseph Croskeyjcroskey@clarion.edu
  • Before I really dive into this, can I get a show of hands? I want to cover a lot of ground today. I don’t have much time. I want to serve you in the best way possible. I want to know why you are here. What do you perceive as the number one challenge / obstacle that you perceive is hindering you from achieving your outcomes in advising?I only have one hour to give you results. I may ask you to do things that you are uncomfortable with. I might put you on the spot- is that ok? Do I have your permission to give you my best, and ask you to do these things so that we can help the most students possible? I have done them myself and with high school students, however you may feel uncomfortable. I would appreciate if you try to participate as much as possible, but if you do not want to participate, that is fine. You can remain in the room, and others I will ask you to respect each others boundaries. I’ll use your vote to determine where to spend the most time. Who came here because they were interested in this idea of mindfulness?Who were drawn more by the idea of authentic advising?In my first PhD class the professor asked me what do I want to study?Something that fascinates me is the development of human potential. IN college I pushed myself to be as strong as possible, set NY state powerlifting records and qualified for nationals. I recently completed my first -&  probably last marathon. I’ve been interested in meditation practices for years & I’ve practiced centering prayer – a Christian form of contemplative practice or meditation for most of my adult life. I also practice yoga & have some experience w/ tai chi & chi gung.In my research I’ve found that the combination of EI & Mindfulness is the best way to develop authentic leaders / authentic advisor.I invite you to collaborate w/ me to develop this further. So naturally when my professor asked the question, I like most people today did what? Right – I googled it -- Let’s workOSHO Have you ever taken a walk with a little child?? No- have u seen the car commercial – kid asking ‘Whats that’ incessantly of the salesperson?Why r trees green, why is rose red? Why whywhy, Why is the child asking? She is intrigued, INTERESTED in everthing! They notice every thing. The word interest comes from a root that means to be involved in – inter-esse. The child is involved in everything that is happening.The more u become knowledgeable, the less and less u remain involved in life. U start going after things, money, power, girls boys…. U r no longer related to life in it’s multidimensionality. To be in wonder is to relate w/ EVERYTHING, & to be constantly RECEPTIVEknowledge destroys the capacity to wonder wonder is 1 of the most valuable things in life and knowledge destroys itthe more you know the less you wonder, and the less you wonder the less life means to you Three main questions today:What is authentic leadership? a. What does that mean to meWhat is mindfulness ? a. So whatHow can reflection practices tie mindfulness & AL together to make me into the best leader I can be? really??The concept of mindfulness is most firmly rooted in Buddhist psychology, but it shares conceptual kinship with ideas advanced by a variety of philosophical and psychological traditions, including ancient Greek philosophy; phenomenology, existentialism, and naturalism in later Western European thought; and transcendentalism and humanism in America. That this mode of being has been commonly described suggests its centrality to the human experience, and indeed, mindfulness is rooted in the fundamental activities of consciousness: attention and awareness. Brown et al 2007BEHere’s a bonus quest-“Does most leadership s***?” In your journal write the word leadership down and then define it. I don’t mean look up the definition. I mean write what leadership means to you. It might be best to break down the question to discover what it is you think about leadership. Once you’ve investigated your ideas on that question add the why part of the question. Don’t forget the last part that addresses your own leadership.College is a learning lab for you to practice what you’re learning and a place where you can deepen your knowledge.Transforming Leadership: The Story of Robert Greenleaf -raises powerful questions, such as“Who am I as a leader” and “Am I living my personal genius and greatness?”The “Servant Leadership Primer” inthe appendix of Robert Greenleaf:ALife of Servant Leadership offers insightsand reflections on developing as a servant-leader. Servant-leadership can’tbe reduced to a formula or technique.It is about developing capacities,habits, attitudes, and values. All ofthese contribute to a leader’sgrowth—like tributaries feeding intoa moving stream. And the source ofthis development starts with one’sidentity and spirit.After you ask a question, what do you do next?
  • Habley in Council for Advancement of Standards in Higher EducationThe importance is underscored by Bean and Eaton (2002), Kuh et al. (2005), and Tinto (1993)
  • PREAMBLEAcademic advising is integral to fulfilling the teaching and learning mission of higher education. Through academic advising, students learn to become members of their higher education community, to think critically about their roles and responsibilities as students, and to prepare to be educated citizens of a democratic society and a global community. Academic advising engages students beyond their own world views, while acknowledging their individual characteristics, values, and motivations as they enter, move through, and exit the institution. Regardless of the diversity of our institutions, our students, our advisors, and our organizational structures, academic advising has three components: curriculum (what advising deals with), pedagogy (how advising does what it does), and student learning outcomes (the result of academic advising).THE CURRICULUM OF ACADEMIC ADVISINGAcademic advising draws primarily from theories in the social sciences, humanities, and education. The curriculum of academic advising ranges from the ideals of higher education to the pragmatics of enrollment. This curriculum includes, but is not limited to, the institution’s mission, culture and expectations; the meaning, value, and interrelationship of the institution’s curriculum and co-curriculum; modes of thinking, learning, and decision-making; the selection of academic programs and courses; the development of life and career goals; campus/community resources, policies, and procedures; and the transferability of skills and knowledge.THE PEDAGOGY OF ACADEMIC ADVISINGAcademic advising, as a teaching and learning process, requires a pedagogy that incorporates the preparation, facilitation, documentation, and assessment of advising interactions. Although the specific methods, strategies, and techniques may vary, the relationship between advisors and students is fundamental and is characterized by mutual respect, trust, and ethical behavior.STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES OF ACADEMIC ADVISINGThe student learning outcomes of academic advising are guided by an institution’s mission, goals, curriculum and co-curriculum. These outcomes, defined in an advising curriculum, articulate what students will demonstrate, know, value, and do as a result of participating in academic advising. Each institution must develop its own set of student learning outcomes and the methods to assess them. The following is a representative sample. Students will:craft a coherent educational plan based on assessment of abilities, aspirations, interests, and valuesuse complex information from various sources to set goals, reach decisions, and achieve those goalsassume responsibility for meeting academic program requirementsarticulate the meaning of higher education and the intent of the institution’s curriculumcultivate the intellectual habits that lead to a lifetime of learningbehave as citizens who engage in the wider world around themSUMMARYAcademic advising, based in the teaching and learning mission of higher education, is a series of intentional interactions with a curriculum, a pedagogy, and a set of student learning outcomes. Academic advising synthesizes and contextualizes students’ educational experiences within the frameworks of their aspirations, abilities and lives to extend learning beyond campus boundaries and timeframes.- See more at: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/Concept-of-Academic-Advising-a598.aspx#sthash.ZQXxTKNA.dpuf
  • The bottom line is that advising requires multiple strategies so advisors effectively respond to multiple and unique audiences.Do you have two advisees that are just alike?Labels – just got email from list serve -: Louis Eugene Schmier <lschmier@VALDOSTA.EDU>Subject: Random Thought: LabelsWe do love to label, don't we: Boomers, Gen-Xers, Me Gerneration, Greatest Generation, Millenials. Now it's Globals and Selfies. In our piety towards labels, in our rush to demystify, we hand over to certain petrified stereotypes a certain control over us. There is a certain power in labeling, in the labels themselves, in speaking a word, in using a word intentionally as something alive and real. The labels focus our attention; they place our energy; they shape our expectations. The way we understand the classroom is very much based on what we can see of the classroom, and what we see is determined by the labeling. And, worse of all, the labeling implies the impossible: we know all there is to know. We treat these "theory of all" so that they allow us to say one size doesn't fit all when it suits us while we suit everyone with one size when it suits us. Yet, the labels are an impossibility as a matter of principle. They don't include everything that can be included. They are so superficial and outward. They're incomplete. They're a cheap imitation. They're limited conceptions of the human condition. They devalue indsividuals. They take a complex and robust life and see it through the distortions akin to Alice's looking glass, and create a world that distances itself from it's own heart. They reveal that we far too often are most comfortable with lifeless, impoverished, unimaginative, undervaluing, identity eclipsing, inherently stale, flat placards rather than with dynamic, fleshed out human intricacy, complexity, and diversity.   There are interesting people out there and they deserve all the attention we can give each of them. And, if label we must and if labels are freighted, let's change not the weight but the freight. Use them to imagine our academic contemporary world differently from the existing tradition. Let us use them wisely apart from the conventional wisdom. Let them have the emotional power of respecting, welcoming, embracing, and loving. So, if there be such a power in naming, as there is, let's use them to be therapeutic rather than pathological, to smile rather than sneer, to build up rather than tear down, to create a healthy climate rather than a poisonous one, to elevate rather than demean, to be passionate rather than resigned, to be hopeful rather than pessimistic, to close rather than to distance, to support and encourage rather than ignore needs, to engage rather than disengage, to empathize rather than be unfeeling, to communalize rather than balkanize, to nurture rather than weed out, to shimmer rather than dull, to embrace rather than push away, to see rather than turn a blind eye to, to listen to rather than be deaf to, to light up rather than darken. Let's transcend the barreling shells. Let's dive beneath the surface of stereotyping and generalizing into the depths of individual uniqueness and true diversity.   Let us name each student instead "individual sacred human being." Name each professor instead "individual sacred human being." Name each administrator instead "individual sacred human being." Name each staff member instead "individual sacred human being."   The heart is a strong muscle. I am proposing a vigorous exercise plan for it. If you say that name enough, over and over and over again, day after day day, you'll heed your better angels rather than be turned by your lesser demons. The eye of your heart will open. You'll see untold secrets. You'll have untold understandings. You'll taste unimagined goodness. You'll feel the undreamt-of beauty. You'll have insight to the innumerable unique potentials. Then, you will slowly change. You will change who you are; you will change how you feel about yourself and others; you will change what you believe; you'll change what you do. You'll appreciate, celebrate, support, encourage, believe, have faith, hope, and love. You'll never act as a spent force. And, the world around you slowly will change. Trust me. I know from the personal experience of having been there until 1991 and am now here since. Make it a good day   Louis Schmierhttp://www.therandomthoughts.edublogs.org203 E. Brookwood Pl http://www.therandomthoughts.com
  • Before clicking, ask if they consider advisors teachers?Bean, J. P., & Eaton, S. (2000). Part I: Revising Tinto's Theory: A Psychological Model of College Student Retention. In , Reworking the Student Departure Puzzle (pp. 48-61). Vanderbilt University Press.
  • Then advisors as leaders?NACADA Pres asked us to be leaders on campus, get the word out about the importance of advising – we are leaders
  • In Academic Advising: A Comprehensive Handbook (2000), Margaret C. King, former NACADA president,
  • The Statement of Core Values does not attempt to dictate the manner in or process through which academic advising takes place, nor does it advocate one particular advising philosophy or model over another. Instead, these Core Values are the reference points advisors use to consider their individual philosophies, strengths, and opportunities for professional growth. Furthermore, the Core Values do not carry equal weight. Advisors will find some Core Values more applicable or valuable to their situations than others. Advisors should consider each Core Value with regard to their own values and those of their institutions.Advising constituents, and especially students, deserve dependable, accurate, timely, respectful, and honest responses. Through this Statement of Core Values, NACADA communicates the expectations that others should hold for advisors in their advising roles. Advisors' responsibilities to their many constituents form the foundation upon which the Core Values rest.- See more at: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/Core-values-introduction.aspx#sthash.ZINHOePv.dpuf
  • 1) Advisors are responsible to the individuals they advise.  Academic advisors work to strengthen the importance, dignity, potential, and unique nature of each individual within the academic setting. Advisors' work is guided by their beliefs that students:have diverse backgrounds that can include different ethnic, racial, domestic, and international communities; sexual orientations; ages; gender and gender identities; physical, emotional, and psychological abilities; political, religious, and educational beliefshold their own beliefs and opinionsresponsible for their own behaviors and the outcomes of those behaviorscan be successful based upon their individual goals and effortshave a desire to learnhave learning needs that vary based upon individual skills, goals, responsibilities, and experiencesuse a variety of techniques and technologies to navigate their world.In support of these beliefs, the cooperative efforts of all who advise include, but are not limited to, providing accurate and timely information, communicating in useful and efficient ways, maintaining regular office hours, and offering varied contact modes. Advising, as part of the educational process, involves helping students develop a realistic self-perception and successfully transition to the postsecondary institution. Advisors encourage, respect, and assist students in establishing their goals and objectives.Advisors seek to gain the trust of their students and strive to honor students' expectations of academic advising and its importance in their lives.2) Advisors are responsible for involving others, when appropriate, in the advising process.Effective advising requires a holistic approach. At many institutions, a network of people and resources is available to students. Advisors serve as mediators and facilitators who effectively use their specialized knowledge and experience for student benefit. Advisors recognize their limitations and make referrals to qualified persons when appropriate. To connect academic advising to students' lives, advisors actively seek resources and inform students of specialists who can further assess student needs and provide access to appropriate programs and services. Advisors help students integrate information so they can make well-informed academic decisions.3) Advisors are responsible to their institutions.Advisors nurture collegial relationships. They uphold the specific policies, procedures, and values of their departments and institutions. Advisors maintain clear lines of communication with those not directly involved in the advising process but who have responsibility and authority for decisions regarding academic advising at the institution. Advisors recognize their individual roles in the success of their institutions.4) Advisors are responsible to higher education.Academic advisors honor academic freedom. They realize that academic advising is not limited to any one theoretical perspective and that practice is informed by a variety of theories from the fields of social sciences, the humanities, and education. They are free to base their work with students on the most relevant theories and on optimal models for the delivery of academic advising programs. Advisors advocate for student educational achievement to the highest attainable standard, support student goals, and uphold the educational mission of the institution. 5) Advisors are responsible to their educational community.Academic advisors interpret their institution's mission as well as its goals and values. They convey institutional information and characteristics of student success to the local, state, regional, national, and global communities that support the student body. Advisors are sensitive to the values and mores of the surrounding community. They are familiar with community programs and services that may provide students with additional educational opportunities and resources. Advisors may become models for students by participating in community activities.6) Advisors are responsible for their professional practices and for themselves personally.Advisors participate in professional development opportunities, establish appropriate relationships and boundaries with advisees, and create environments that promote physical, emotional, and spiritual health. Advisors maintain a healthy balance in their lives and articulate personal and professional needs when appropriate. They consider continued professional growth and development to be the responsibility of both themselves and their institutions.- See more at: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/Core-values-declaration.aspx#sthash.97Ie9xSg.dpuf
  • craft a coherent educational plan based on assessment of abilities, aspirations, interests, and values;  use complex information from various sources to set goals, reach decisions, and achieve those goals;  assume responsibility for meeting academic program requirements;  articulate the meaning of higher education and the intent of the institution’s curriculum;  cultivate the intellectual habits that lead to a lifetime of learning; and  behave as citizens who engage in the wider world around them (NACADA, 2006, para. 10).
  • George describes authentic leadership as people who know their True North, (book of same title)These practices today can help us be authentic leaders who provide authentic advisingWhen we live on purpose, miracles can happenNext slideThe way to do that isAuthentic leaders understand their own values & behave toward others based on these values. Stated another way, George portrays an authentic leader as one who knows their “true North. They have a clear idea of who they are, where they are going, and what the right thing is to do. When tested in difficult situations, authentic leaders do not compromise their values, but rather use those situations to strengthen their values. – NorthouseWe’ll look at three different viewpoints: intrapersonal, developmental and interpersonalhttp://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/2011/leading-with-heart/George, B & Sims (2007) True North: Discover your authentic leadership
  • I want to know what other people think of mindfulnessSo naturally I ___________________ right google itThe concept of mindfulness is most firmly rooted in Buddhist psychology, but it shares conceptual kinship with ideas advanced by a variety of philosophical and psychological traditions, including ancient Greek philosophy; phenomenology, existentialism, and naturalism in later Western European thought; and transcendentalism and humanism in America. That this mode of being has been commonly described suggests its centrality to the human experience, and indeed, mindfulness is rooted in the fundamental activities of consciousness: attention and awareness. Brown et al 2007Share --What is your main motivation for being in this session today?
  • Mindful is first in the title because it is so important to being authentic. By mindful I suggest we use the definition by Jon Kabat-Zinn; paying attention, with a particular purpose, at this current moment. I will use two theories to describe authentic. Emotional Intelligence based on the work of Goleman and Authentic Leadership as studied/conceived by Walumbwa and associates, among others including George. I hope we can collaborate and evolve this concept together. I hope this will make you a successful advisor with successful advisees. I want everyone to know and live their purpose. Why? Because that will make the universe happy. I want a happy universe, do you?
  • If you have all these qualities, will you be a more effective advisor?Mindfulness improves well beingIncreasing your capacity for mindfulness supports many attitudes that contribute to a satisfied life.Being mindful makes it easier to savor the pleasures in life as they occur, helps you become fully engaged in activities, and creates a greater capacity to deal with adverse events.By focusing on the here and now, many people who practice mindfulness find that they are less likely to get caught up in worries about the future or regrets over the past, are less preoccupied with concerns about success and self-esteem, and are better able to form deep connections with others.Mindfulness improves physical healthIf greater well-being isn’t enough of an incentive, scientists have discovered the benefits of mindfulness techniques help improve physical health in a number of ways. Mindfulness can:help relieve stresstreat heart diseaselower blood pressurereduce chronic painimprove sleepalleviate gastrointestinal difficultiesMindfulness improves mental healthIn recent years, psychotherapists have turned to mindfulness meditation as an important element in the treatment of a number of problems, including:depressionsubstance abuseeating disorderscouples’ conflictsanxiety disordersobsessive-compulsive disorderSome experts believe that mindfulness works, in part, by helping people to accept their experiences—including painful emotions—rather than react to them with aversion and avoidance.It’s become increasingly common for mindfulness meditation to be combined with psychotherapy, especially cognitive behavioral therapy. This development makes good sense, since both meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy share the common goal of helping people gain perspective on irrational, maladaptive, and self-defeating thoughts.
  • Do you think that understanding your own and your advises feeling & emotions will help you advise better?Did you ever think, I would be more successful if…I was more self-awareIf I can remain calm confident and flexible in a crisisIf I can understand people betterIf I can better help studentsYou Can!These qualities are skillsThese skills are trainableAt the end of this session you will better understand mindfulness, emotional intelligence, authentic leadership and some practical skills that you can take w/ you. Skills that can literally change your life.
  • Verified on multicultural populationsAuthentic Leaders NorthousePromising new field, in response to societal demands for genuine, trustworthy and good leadershipConceptualized in three ways, intrapersonally, developmentally, interpersonallyIntrapersonally –self knowledge, self-regulation, self-concept (Shamir and Eilam)Developmentally – develops over lifetime, triggered by major life events; positive psychological qualities and strong ethics; self-awareness, internalized moral perspective, balanced processing, relational transparency –Avolio, WalumbwaInterpersonally – relational, created by leaders and followers togetherGeorge – compassionIdeas about Authentic AdvisingMindfulness and Emotional Intelligence can generate Authentic AdvisingWhen one endeavors to skillfully and regularly apply mindfulness practices to enhance their emotional intelligence skills, one may become an effective authentic advisor. Benefits to advising – when an advisor develops the interpersonal and intrapersonal skills associated with effective emotional intelligence enhanced by mindfulness practice, they are more present during the session and hear the student/client more completely. A better understanding of the student (by the advisor and the student) will emerge that will lead to more successful guidance. Advising presence will be improved. Advisor resilience will be improved. The advisor will be better prepared to respond to stress and stressful situations. The advisor will be able to respond to each individual and situation with flexibility and accuracy.
  • Meng – Google public, didn’t have to workCreate conditions for world peaceCollaborated w/ thought leaders Dan Goleman EI, neuroscientist Philip Golden, peace makers ThichNhat Hahn, compassionate warriors like Mirabai Bush to bring this practice of EI & Mindfulness to the world.He is creating the conditions for world peace- one individ at a timeI want to teach people to sing – not literally, I want people to be all they can be, to know and live their purposeI invite you on this journey w/ Meng and me Go to siyli.org, get the book, listen to the videos, practice, practice practice – be happyWhat I discuss today is in the bookTan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOne
  • The most important thing is to BE whatever you are without shame- Rod SeigerW.L. Gardner et al. / The Leadership Quarterly 22 (2011) 1120–1145Authenticity can be traced back to ancient Greek philosophy and is reflected by the Greek aphorism “Know Thyself”which was inscribed in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi (Parke & Wormell, 1956).With the combination of EI & M training Meng describes the process as optimizing yourself Indeed, the etymology of the word authenticcan be traced to the Greek word, authento, “to have full power” (Trilling, 1972), reflecting the notion of authenticfunctioning whereby an individual is “the master of his or her own domain” (Kernis & Goldman, 2006). An early referenceto authentic functioning is Socrates' focus on self-inquiry as he argued that an “unexamined” life is not worth living. Aristotlefollowed with a view of ethics that focused on one's pursuit of the “higher good” achieved through self-realizationwhen the activity of the soul is aligned with virtue to produce a complete life (Hutchinson, 1995). Such self-realization istied to one's well-being or “eudaimonia,” a form of happiness that, in contrast to hedonism which seeks happinessand pleasure as desired end states, arises from successfully performing activities that reflect one's true calling (Kernis &Goldman, 2006).
  • What does this appear to be?Notice your big toe on your right foot. Notice the pressure, the temperature, anything else about itMindfulness is often referred to as state in which people approach each moment with alertness and awarenessWhat does that mean for you?Rather, the main focus of Insight meditation is the cultivation of attention and a mental capacity termed ‘mindfulness’, which is a specific nonjudgmental awareness of present-moment stimuli without cognitive elaboration So how does this apply – with mindfulness you are paying attention to what is going on. You know how you feel & you know how others feel.Now you really know how your big toe feels – it does a lot of work for you, give it the attention it deserves In SusanGreenlands book, when asked “What is a Mindful Student”? Students (eight grade newspaper) wrote - After a session of Mindful Awareness, students gradually became more positive and less tired, and their stresses began to go away. Susan Greenland - The Mindful Child"Leaders all over the planet are beginning to understand the benefits of purposefully learning to be more attentive and focused, non-reactive, and clear." —Saki Santorelli, EdD, Executive Director, Center for Mindfulness : Institute for Mindful LeadershipRead below then do -Mindfulness – raisin and craisin exercise http://www.mindfulnessinfo.com/exercise-2-the-raisin/Let me read to you the abstract from a recent article that was published and presented via webinar from the National Assoc of XXX of which I am a member.Catherine Kerr – National Institutes of HealthMeditation is a form of mental exercise that has become a popular US health practice. Regular practice of meditation is reported to produce changes in mental state and resting electroencephalogram patterns that persist beyond the time-period of active practice [1]. We hypothesized that regular meditation practice should also result in significant changes in the cortical structure in regions that are routinely engaged during this mental exercise. To test this hypothesis, we used magnetic resonance imaging to visualize differences in the thickness of the cerebral cortex of experienced Buddhist Insight meditation practitioners. This form of meditation does not utilize mantra or chanting. Rather, the main focus of Insight meditation is the cultivation of attention and a mental capacity termed ‘mindfulness’, which is a specific nonjudgmental awareness of present-moment stimuli without cognitive elaboration [2]. Formal practice involves sustained mindful attention to internal and external sensory stimuli. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that between-group and experience-dependent differences in cortical thickness would be found in brain regions involved in attention and sensory processing, thereby showing evidence of cortical plasticity.
  • 5 domainsThe best way to develop these skills is with mindfulness practices. The mindfulness practices enhance the underlying brain structures.http://blogcritics.org/scitech/article/emotional-intelligence-skill-building-can-enhance/
  • Self awareness – spoke to a recent grad, she started as bio major headed for vet school (actually spoke to two of these majors lately) she realized when she was in a bio lab during her 4th or 5th semester that she could not put a mouse to sleep. She had to change her major, switched to biz mng/mrktg, now is doing very well working w/ bankHow many know the capable student, High SAT, GPA but just doesn’t seem to be able to pull away from the game console?Motivation, Empathy, Social SkillsDo you think improving these skills can help make you more successful?
  • Great leaders possess all 5 of these qualities – study of Navy leaders by Bachman & other studiesSelf aware, self regulated, motivated, care about people, people like them & will do anything for themEmotional skillfulness frees us from emotional compulsion. We create problems when we are compelled by emotions to act one way or another, but if we become so skillful with our emotions that we are no longer compelled, we can act in rational ways that are best for ourselves and everybody else. And we will play nice, share candy, and not bite ourGoogle engineersIQ A weak predictor for achievement job performance successoverall success, wealth, & happinessEI Accounts for a major component of employment success according to numbers of studies covering career success; maybe as much as 20-25%.The top engineers at Google exhibited 6 traits, 2 of them related to conceptual ability, 4 of them related to social/emotional skillsbusiness people & military officers rated in top quintile are people with good social skills – Bachman study entitled Nice Guys Finish FirstThink of the best manager you ever had – did they have good people skills?Emotion-Arouse, sustain, direct activityPart of the total economy of living organisms Not in opposition to intelligenceThemselves a higher order of intelligenceThe main purpose of the innermostpart of the brain is survival.
  • The 5 areas of EI relate directly to these skillsI estimate that of the top 13 at least 8 – 10 or 76% are primarily emotional competencies# 8 or 5 – as good advisor you possess these skillsEmpathy and social skillsSelf regulation6 – empathy, social skills8 motivation, self regulation10 – self awarenessBefore clicking, ask if they consider advisors teachers?Then advisors as leaders?
  • Instead of teaching behaviors, we will learn skillsi.e. if we practice skills that manage anger, then poor behaviors related to anger will go awayWe begin this by training attention. Attention to mind & bodyOur approach to cultivating emotional intelligence begins with mindfulness. We use mindfulness to train a quality of attention that is strong both in clarity and stability. We then direct this power-charged attention to the physiological aspects of emotion so we can perceive emotion with high vividness and resolution. The ability to perceive the emotional experience at a high level of clarity and resolution builds the foundation for emotional intelligence. And we live happily ever after.
  • When a student says they ‘don’t like the teacher’ or they work better under pressure – WHAT do you automatically think?Practice skills that help us to know How not to fly off the handle when your button is pushedWouldn’t it be better to be mindful of your triggers? When you are mindful of them, you can stop the automatic knee jerk reactions, put in space to think and be flexible
  • http://www.letslivenice.com/2012/01/neuroplasticity.htmlA dangerous belief in our culture is that we can't change. We’ve all heard the disempowered statements: “He’s just grumpy. He can’t change that.” or “I will always be anxious. It's the way I was born.” While we most certainly have genetic predispositions, the brains of individuals’ young and old can change in amazing ways.Have you ever heard a student say – I’m not good at math?EXERCISE TO GET STARTED REWIRING YOUR BRAIN – touch thumb to pinky, thumb to index, thumb to ring, thumb to middle , together – uno dos tres Quattro WHAT this demonstrates is – OUR BRAINS CAN CHANGEOur brains are made up of billions of neurons. Neurons connect to one another, forming pathways that relay information. We learn things by forming neural connections in response to associations in our everyday experiences1. In learning to drive a car, we experience the connection between red traffic lights and pressing the brake. We form a neural pathway for this association. Each time we brake at a red light, we reinforce and strengthen the neural pathway. As the saying goes, "Neurons that fire together, wire together." The more we practice something, the more we strengthen the pathway, and the easier the skill becomes. Our behavioral response can become almost automatic
  • Gratitude reflections, compassion priming, and meditation interventions are some strategies found to enhance well-being and increase prosocial behavior. Several studies have shown the positive impact of gratitude journals, which involve self-guided listing of what you are thankful for. Individuals who kept a daily gratitude journal reported higher levels of positive emotions, including feeling attentive, determined, energetic, enthusiastic, excited, interested, joyful, and strong, compared to individuals who kept a journal on daily hassles or ways in which one was better off than others (downward social comparison). In addition, individuals who maintained daily gratitude journals were more likely to offer emotional support to others and help someone with a problem7. Contemplative interventions, born from the collaboration of meditation traditions and emotion science, have centered on developing mindfulness to enhance compassion and happiness in the lives of individuals. One recent study provided an 8-week training program in secular meditation to female schoolteachers and measured their responses to stress, conflict, and compassion. The intervention significantly reduced rumination, depression, and anxiety while increasing mindfulness, empathy, compassion, and stabilizing hostility and contempt compared to a control group6. Kemeny, Margaret E. et al. “Contemplative/Emotion Training Reduces Negative Emotional Behavior and Promotes Prosocial Responses.” Emotion, (2011): epub.Intention attention attitude http://www.ormsby.at/en/attention-mindfulness-results/
  • What does attention have to do w/ emotional intelligence?A strong stable and perceptive attention that affords you a calm and clear mind is the basis of emotional intelligence!How do you train this skill? Mindfulness is the wayRemember zinn definition – Paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally. Something you can sustain deepen and create on demand w/ training
  • Mindfulness should begin with intention, a reason for wanting to do it, it might be to reduce stress or increase well being Yours or even more powerful, Others well beingBring attention to the breath – might last a little while, then distraction happens – bring attention back to breath – Like exercise in gym – doing curlsAttitude towards yourself – not usually recommended to listen to the screaming critic, If possible shift the attitude towards self directed kindness and curiosityGratitude reflections, compassion priming, and meditation interventions are some strategies found to enhance well-being and increase prosocial behavior. Several studies have shown the positive impact of gratitude journals, which involve self-guided listing of what you are thankful for. Individuals who kept a daily gratitude journal reported higher levels of positive emotions, including feeling attentive, determined, energetic, enthusiastic, excited, interested, joyful, and strong, compared to individuals who kept a journal on daily hassles or ways in which one was better off than others (downward social comparison). In addition, individuals who maintained daily gratitude journals were more likely to offer emotional support to others and help someone with a problem7. Contemplative interventions, born from the collaboration of meditation traditions and emotion science, have centered on developing mindfulness to enhance compassion and happiness in the lives of individuals. One recent study provided an 8-week training program in secular meditation to female schoolteachers and measured their responses to stress, conflict, and compassion. The intervention significantly reduced rumination, depression, and anxiety while increasing mindfulness, empathy, compassion, and stabilizing hostility and contempt compared to a control group6. Kemeny, Margaret E. et al. “Contemplative/Emotion Training Reduces Negative Emotional Behavior and Promotes Prosocial Responses.” Emotion, (2011): epub.Intention attention attitude http://www.ormsby.at/en/attention-mindfulness-results/
  • SIYStart by creating an intention – reduce stress, increase well being, maybe you want to cultivate your emotional intelligence for fun and profit, or maybe you just want to create the conditions for world peace or somethingThis is even more powerful when your intention is toward the well-being of others. After creating the intention, follow your breathYour Attention may gather and your mind is calm and concentratedCruising right along, in the flow & then DistractionRuminate, worry, fantasize, Sometimes, I even fantasize about not worrying. After a while, we realize our attention has wandered away. The default reaction of most people at this point is self-criticism. We start telling ourselves stories about how horrible we are as meditators and, by extension, not particularly good people either. Happily, there is a skillful way to deal with thisThe first thing to do is to simply regain attentional focus by bringing attention back to the process of breathingThe second thing to do is to realize this process of bringing a wandering attention back is like flexing your biceps during your gym workout. This is not failure; it is the process of growth and developing powerful mental “muscles.The third thing to do is to become aware of your attitude toward yourself. See how you treat yourself and how often you engage in nasty gossip about yourself. If possible, shift the attitude toward self-directed kindness and curiosityAdopt the mind of loving grandmother
  • Practice timeSIY Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOneWhat happens when you do this – well distraction may be the most common when that happens – be gentle w/ yourselfOften in our meditation, we get distracted by sounds, thoughts, or physical sensations. I suggest a four-step plan to work with such distractions: 1. Acknowledge. 2. Experience without judging or reacting. 3. If you need to react, continue maintaining mindfulness. 4. Let it goMINDFULNESS PRACTICE 1offer two ways to experience a taste of mindfulness: the Easy Way and the Easier Way. The creatively named Easy Way is to simply bring gentle and consistent attention to your breath for one minute. That’s it. Start by becoming aware that you are breathing, and then pay attention to the process of breathing. Every time your attention wanders away, just bring it back very gently. The Easier Way is, as its name may subtly suggest, even easier. All you have to do is sit without agenda for one minute. Life really cannot get much simpler than that. The idea here is to shift from “doing” to “being,” whatever that means to you, for just oneminute. Just be. To make it even easier, you’re free to switch between the Easy Way and the Easier Way anytime during the minute. Any time you feel like you want to bring awareness to breathing, just switch to Easy. Any time you decide you’d rather just sit without agenda, just switch to Easier. PostureWHAT DID YOU NOTICE?Posture – Ever go to athletic event- notice the sideline of each team near the end of the game – the winning team and the losing team – what might you notice that is different in their posture? Or have you ever played a musical instrument? How do you sit? Or you’re in class, what might the teacher say? Sit in a posture that allows you to be alert and relaxed. Perhaps imagining your spine as a string of pearls that’s being held from above, straight and yet not rigid.Allowing your shoulders to drop and perhaps positioning your head so that your chin is pulled down a little bit.
  • There is another way that increased levels of mindfulness change brain function. Several neurobiological studies have shown that during affect labeling, that is, when we use words to identify the emotion we are feeling, the prefrontal cortex becomes active and downregulates the activity of the amygdala, a region commonly associated with negative affective states. Interestingly, in people suffering from depression, the prefrontal cortex is less able to moderate the activity of the amygdala.
  • With mindfulness practices we can learn to Put a pause button on ithttp://www.mindfulness-matters.org/
  • Let’s read this togetherOur body is constantly sending these signals. We can use them to understand our own emotional state AND the emotional state of othersWe learn to do this through mindfulness practices that make us aware of emotions as they arise.WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT, let me offer an exampleMindfulness makes it possible for you to be emotionally intelligent when you are sitting with the advisee and they say something that triggers you. When that student lies/ & you know it. You can respond in the best possible way.With mindfulness and EI you notice the trigger, you are aware, you let it go and I’ll advise this student in the best possible way.You advise the student authentically.How refined can I make my attention?What benefit will I realize as I attune to this?Have you ever seen someone’s neck or face turn red when they were feeling an emotion?Can you detect anger the moment it is arising?When you are aware of your body, - if your chest tightens when you are angry - then you know exactly what you are feeling and you can then choose how to act when you notice those bodily sensations
  • Begin practices by focus on body –Bc You can begin to read emotional states by body postureAll emotional states have physiological correlates – insular cortex helps you understand these emotionsAttune to moment to moment changes in physiologyListen to your emotions via sensations in your bodySATI Mindfulness (Pali: sati,[1] Sanskrit: smṛti; also translated asawareness) is a spiritual or psychological faculty (indriya) that, according to the teaching of the Buddha, is considered to be of great importance in the path to enlightenment
  • High spacial and high temporal resolutionHigh resolution perception into the process of emotionCan u detect anger as soon as it arises in the body?If mindfulness is in mind it’s hard to detect as quickly as you can when you notice physiological changes.i.e. in case of angerMy chest is tightening, my breathing getting shallow etcIntuition comes from awareness of bodyGambling w/ cards blue and red deck described in SIY and Gladwell, M. (2005). Blink: The power of thinking without thinking. New York: Little, Brown and Co.Hunch begins earlier than cognitive thoughtHands sweat b4 that
  • Basal ganglia is primitive – it is tied to intuitionCreates decision rulesThis is good, this is badThis eats me, this doesn’tDirect connection to the gut, no direct connection to the thinking brain - speakingThis is the basis of gut feeling What have our bodies got to do with developing emotional intelligence? There are two very good reasons to work with our bodies: vividness and resolution.Matthew Lieberman’s review of research showed “evidence suggesting that the basal ganglia are the neuroanatomical bases of both implicit learning and intuition.” The story behind basal ganglia is, once again, best told by our friend Daniel Goleman: The basal ganglia observes everything we do in life, every situation, and extracts decision rules.... Our life wisdom on any topic is stored in the basal ganglia. The basal ganglia is so primitive that it has zero connectivity to the verbal cortex. It can’t tell us what it knows in words. It tells us in feelings, it has a lot of connectivity to the emotional centers of the brain and to the gut. It tells us this is right or this is wrong as a gut feeling.PRINCIPLES OF SIYEmotional skills are trainableStart training with attention –mindfulnessEmotions are in brain, AND also in body
  • Practice time 2Body ScanJournaling, 4 min p97 promptsSIY Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOneBecause emotion is a physiological experience we can create a high resolution awareness of emotion by applying mindfulness to the body.The first one, Body Scan, functions at the level of physiology and works best for developing emotional awareness. The second, Journaling, functions at the level of meaning and works best for developing accurate self-assessment.Let’s do an abbreviated Body Scan – we will focus briefly on those areas most affected by emotion.Settling Attention Let us begin by sitting comfortably for 2 minutes. Sit in a position that enables you to be both relaxed and alert at the same time, whatever that means to you. Now, let us breathe naturally and bring very gentle attention to the breath. You can either bring attention to the nostrils, the abdomen, or the entire body of breath, whatever that means to you. Become aware of in breath, out breath, and space Now bring your attention to the top of your head, ears, and back of your head. Notice sensations, or lack of sensations, for 1 minuteNow move your attention to your face. Your forehead, eyes, cheeks, nose, lips, mouth, and inside of your mouth (gums, tongue) for 1 minNeck and Shoulders Move your attention to your neck, the inside of your throat, and your shoulders for 1 minBack Move your attention to your lower back, mid back, and upper back for 1 minute. The back carries a lot of our load and stores a lot of our tension. So let us give our backs the kind and loving attention they deserve. Front Now move your attention to the chest and stomach for 1 minute. If it is possible for you, try to bring attention to your internal organs, whatever that means to you. Entire Body at Once And now bring your attention to your entire body all at once for 1 minScan for Emotion Did you find any emotion in your body? If there is any, just notice its presence in the body. If not, just notice the absence of emotions, and catch one if it arises in the next 2 minPositive Emotion Let us now try to experience a positive emotion in the body. Bring to mind a memory of a happy, joyous event or a time when you were optimal and productive or a time when you felt confident. Experience the feeling of positive emotion. Now, bring your attention to your body. What does that positive emotion feel like in the body? In the face? chest, back? How are you breathing? Any difference in level of tension? Let us just experience it for 3 minutes. Returning to Grounding Let us now return to the present. If you find an emotionally charged thought, just let it go. Bring your attention to either your body or your breath, whichever your mind finds more stability in. And let’s just settle the mind there for 2 minutes. (Long pause) Thank you for your attention.
  • http://stressguide101.blogspot.com/2010/11/how-to-be-deep-thinker.htmlYou r what you thinkJoe Dispenza Evolve your Brain - What the Bleep Do we know fameAS Man Thinketh, Think and Grow Rich, or Thinking Fast and Slow – lots of titlesBasically amounts to – u r what you thinkEmerging field of sci called Psychoneuroimmunology that has demonstrated connection between mind and body. Think of medical trials that give placebos and the healing results are similar to those of the new medicine. Your every thought produces a bio-chemical reaction in the brain. The brain then releases chemical signals that are transmitted to the body, where they act as the messengers of thought. The thoughts that produce the chemicals in the brain allow your body to feel exactly the way you were just thinking. So every thought produces a chemical that is matched by a feeling in your body. Essentially, when you think happy, inspiring, or positive thoughts, your brain manufactures chemicals that make you feel joyful, inspired, or uplifted. For example, when you anticipate an experience that is pleasurable, the brain immediately makes a chemical neurotransmitter called DOPAMINE, which turns the brain and body on in anticipation of that experience and causes you to begin to feel excited. TRY IT NOW, THINK OF SOMETHING FUN, SOMETHING THAT MAKES YOU SMILE, YEAH THERE YOU GO, LAST NIGHT, WARM COOKIES, GREAT SONG, WHATEVER If you have hateful, angry or self-deprecating thoughts, the brain also produces chemicals called NEUROPEPTIDES that the body responds to in a comparable way. You feel hateful, angry, or unworthy. You see, your thoughts immediately do become matter! Mirror neurons – Camry commercial - http://youtu.be/UAvIPfzqQh4
  • One application, what am I thinking right now, what am I feeling right nowMindfulness to eating – practice if we have time, to walkingBenefit –recover from distraction – pay attention to the advisee, your mind drifts, drift back – you’ll be more effective advising that studentYou can stabilize so you don’t hit send on the derogatory email to your boss
  • Nothing wrong w/ planning or recalling - reflectingWhen you want to listen to your daughter describe her day at school,When you want to listen to your adviseeDriving a carAbility to stay in present as opposed to being lost or pulled in another direction SATIThe famous Vietnamese Zen master ThichNhatHanh defined mindfulness very poetically as “keeping one’s consciousness alive to the present reality.
  • Mindfulness—as a state, trait, process, type of meditation, and intervention has proven to be beneficial across a diverse group of psychological disorders as well as for general stress reduction. Yet, there remains a lack of clarity in the operationalization of this construct, and underlying mechanisms. Here, we provide an integrative theoretical framework and systems-based neurobiological model that explains the mechanisms by which mindfulness reduces biases related to self-processing and creates a sustainable healthy mind. Mindfulness is described through systematic mental training that develops meta-awareness (self-awareness), an ability to effectively modulate one's behavior (self-regulation), and a positive relationship between self and other that transcends self-focused needs and increases prosocial characteristics (self-transcendence). This framework of self-awareness, -regulation, and -transcendence (S-ART) illustrates a method for becoming aware of the conditions that cause (and remove) distortions or biases.
  • Process model of mindfulness meditation
  • Meditation is not Magic ---Traditional definitions of meditation are very close to the modern scientific one above. The Tibetan word for meditation is Gom, which means “to familiarize or to habituate.” In Pali, the 2,600-year-old language of the earliest Buddhist texts, the word for meditation is Bhavana, which means “to cultivate,” as in plantingMindfulness trains two important faculties, attention and meta-attention. Attention is something we all understand. William James has a very nice definition for it: “taking possession by the mind, in clear and vivid form.”3 Meta-attention is attention of attention, the ability to pay attention to attention itself. Huh? Simply put, meta-attention is the ability to know that your attention has wandered away.Like riding bike – wobbly at first, you notice wobble, you readjust and stay balanced. After while you make microrecoveries to stay balanced. When you recover quickly and often enough you create the Effect of continuous balance. – Your concentration is just like this. You notice drifting off, then you bring it back.
  • Mindfulness trains two important faculties, attention and meta-attention. Attention is something we all understand. William James has a very nice definition for it: “taking possession by the mind, in clear and vivid form.”3 Meta-attention is attention of attention, the ability to pay attention to attention itself. Huh? Simply put, meta-attention is the ability to know that your attention has wandered away.Like riding bike – wobbly at first, you notice wobble, you readjust and stay balanced. After while you make microrecoveries to stay balanced. When you recover quickly and often enough you create the Effect of continuous balance. – Your concentration is just like this. You notice drifting off, then you bring it back.
  • Serenity: stillness, calmness, peaceMindfulness: clarity alertnessHappiness
  • Listen to your heart and listen to others. get down w/ your funky self
  • Practice time 3SIY Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOneMINDFUL LISTENINGA beautiful way to practice mindfulness is to apply mindfulness toward others for the benefits of others. The idea is very simple—give your full moment-to-moment attention to another person with a nonjudgmental mind, and every time your attention wanders away, just gently bring it back. It is just like the meditation we have been practicing, except the object of meditation is the other person. FORMAL PRACTICE OF MINDFUL LISTENING In this exercise, we will practice listening in a way that is different from how we usually listen. We will do this in pairs, with a family member or a friend, each person taking turns to be the speaker and the listener. Instructions for the speaker: This will be a monologue. You get to speak uninterrupted for 3 minutes. Today bc of time we cut in half. If you run out of things to say, that is fine; you can just sit in silence and whenever you have something to say, you may continue speaking again. The entire 3 minutes belong to you, you can use the time in whatever ways you want, and know that whenever you are ready to speak, there is a person ready to listen to you. Instructions for the listener: Your job is to listen. When you listen, give your full attention to the speaker. You may not ask questions during these 3 minutes. You may acknowledge with facial expressions, by nodding your head, or by saying, “I see,” or “I understand.” You may not speak except to acknowledge. Try not to over-acknowledge, or you might end up leading the speaker. And if the speaker runs out of things to say, give her the space for silence, and then be available to listen when she speaks again. Let us have one person speak and one listen for 3 minutes and then switch over for another 3 minutes. After that, have a 3-minute meta-conversation, in which both of you talk about what this experience was like for you. Suggested topics for the monologue: • What are you feeling right now / What is something that happened today that you want to talk about? • Anything else you want to talk about…RING BELLWhen talking to a friend or loved one Remind yourself that because this person is so valuable to you, he or she is entitled to all your attention and all the space and time needed to express himself or herself.As you listen, give your full attention to the speaker. If you find your attention wandering away, just very gently bring it back to the speaker, as if he or she is a sacred object of meditation. As much as possible, try to refrain from speaking, asking questions, or leading the speaker. Remember, you are giving him or her the valuable gift of airtime. You may acknowledge with facial expressions, or by nodding your head, or by saying, “I see,” or “I understand,” but try not to over-acknowledge so as to not lead the As usual, ThichNhatHanh put it most poetically: “The most precious gift we can offer others is our presence. When mindfulness embraces those we love, they will bloom like flowers.”The three parts to this skill are listening, looping, and dipping. Listening means giving the gift of attention to the speaker. Looping means closing the loop of communication by demonstrating that you have really heard what the person is saying. Do not try to remember everything: if you really listen, you will hear. Dipping means checking in with yourself, knowing how you are feeling about what you are hearing. Part of the practice is becoming able to give full attention to the speaker, with full awareness of your own feelings.Instructions Part I: Monologue Person A speaks in monologue for 4 minutes. When you are speaking, maintain some mindfulness on your body (this is the dipping part). The entire 4 minutes belong to you, so if you run out of things to say, you can both sit in silence, and when you have something else to say later, you may just say it. Person B listens. Your job is to give your full attention to the speaker as a gift, while at the same time maintaining some mindfulness on your body (this is again the dipping part). You are giving him the gift of your attention, without losing awareness of your body. You acknowledge, but do not over-acknowledge. You may not speak except to acknowledge. Part II: Resolution After that, B repeats back to A what she thinks she heard. B may start by saying, “What I heard you say was…” Immediately after, A gives feedback by telling B what he feels B got right or wrong (for example, what she missed, what she misrepresented, etc). Go back and forth until A is satisfied that he is completely understood by B. Do this for as long as it takes, or until 6 minutes are up. (This is the looping part). Then we switch places, so B gets to be the speaker and A the listener. After the exercise, spend 4 minutes in meta-conversation discussing the experience. Some suggested topics for conversation: • Your self-assessment. Your impressions of yourself, what you like, what you want to change, A difficult situation that happened recently or a long time ago that you want to talk about. • Any other topic that is meaningful to
  • Avolio, Gardner, & WalumbwaWalumbwa 2008 – AL is composed of four distinct but related components: self-awareness, internalized moral perspective, balanced processing, and relational transparencyAuthentic Leaders:exhibit genuine leadershiplead from convictionoriginal, not copiesbase their actions on their valuesShapiro et al. (2006) posit that mindfulness and reperception may facilitate additional mechanisms such as:self-regulation, self-management: remaining stable “in the face of unpleasant internal states and to be less controlled by particular emotions and thoughts”emotional, cognitive, behavioral flexibility: an individual’s “sense of competence in managing their environment”, individuals “can either choose, create, or modify environments to suit their needs”values clarification: ”recognition by individuals of what they truly value and is meaningful for them in their lives”exposure: “willingness to remain in contact with unpleasant internal experiences”This connection was in part confirmed in a later study by Carmody et al. (2009) from which the above definitions are taken.The four above mechanisms overlap with definitions of social competence, emotional literacy, emotional intelligence and people skills – concepts which are thought to be associated with the establishment of high-quality relationships.http://www.ormsby.at/en/attention-mindfulness-results/
  • Keep
  • advising – when you develop the skills necessary for EI and you practice mindfulness you can be more present during the session and hear the student/client more completely. A better understanding will hopefully lead to better guidance.Mindfulness and Emotional Intelligence can generate Authentic AdvisingAdvising presenceAdvisor resilience
  • So, knowing what we know about Authentic Leaders, How does it apply to Advising?In fact, why should we apply a leadership model to advising?What leadership models define and predict norms of leader and follower interaction in a manner that is beneficial to every stakeholder from followers to leaders, and ultimately the organization? Many practitioners and scholars alike have drawn a distinction between management and leadership and the distinction in Kotter’s (1990) model posits that management produces order and consistency while leadership produces change and movement (Northouse, 2010). Rost (1991) contends that leadership is a multidirectional influence relationship while management is simply a unidirectional influence (Northouse, 2010). The leadership model is incredibly important in university settings, specifically in advising offices. The distinction that leadership is multidirectional is useful for advisors concerned with the development of students. Perhaps the field of leadership can inform a model that advisors can implement to create an environment that leads a student to achieve his or her full potential.The level and quality of student interaction with peers, faculty and staff greatly affects retention rates (as cited in Nutt, 2012). Tinto and Astin
  • http://womanmonk.wordpress.com/19-2/Mindfulness is not – a mystical religion or some weird New Age California thingThe natural clarity of everyone’s minds can be hidden by the restless mental chatter of daily experienceSNOW GLOBE or surface of a pond – still=see clearly, windy, ripples= can’t see what’s underneath – mental restlessness can be like wind on surface of a pondIn Zen Mind, Beginners Mind Suzuki Toshi describes a clear mind as a ‘beginner’s mind,” a mind like a childs. – Susan GreenlandBeginners mind is open and receptive, one of non reactive, nonconceptual awareness. It’s not empty, but it’s a lens through which we experience life directly and clearheadedly.KUNG FU PANDA ANYONE??A beginner’s mind is open and receptive to new ideas, not closed down by adhering rigidly to what he or she believes to be true.NEXT
  • MINDFULNESS IS A MIRROR OF WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE PRESENT MOMENT – The Mindful Child Susan Kaiser Greenland
  • Practice timeMindful ConversationSIY Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOneCHECK OUT THE FORMAL PRACTICE IN THE BOOKthree key components to mindful conversation. The first and most obvious one is mindful listening, which we have already practiced. The second is something Gary called “looping,” short for “closing the loop of communication.” Looping is simple. Let’s say there are two people involved in this conversation—Allen and Becky—and it is Allen’s turn to speak. Allen speaks for a while, and after he is done speaking, Becky (the listener) loops back by saying what she thought she heard Allen say. After that, Allen gives feedback on what he thought was missing or misrepresented in Becky’s characterization of his original And they go back and forth until Allen (the original speaker) feels satisfied that he is correctly understood by Becky (the original listener). Looping is a collaborative project in which both people work together to help Becky (the listener) fully understand Allen The third key component to mindful conversation is something Gary called “dipping,” or checking in with ourselves. The main reason we do not listen to others is that we get distracted by our own feelings and internal chatter, often in reaction to what the other person said. The best way to respond to these internal distractions is to notice and acknowledge them. Know that they are there, try not to judge them, and let them go if they are willing to go. If feelings or other internal distracters decide to stay around, let them be and just be aware of how they may affect your listening. You can think of dipping as self-directed mindfulness during
  • Practice 5Empathy - JUST LIKE ME & LOVING KINDNESSSIY Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOneTo Avoid the LABELING of others we mentioned earlierTo develop empathy & compassion. To create mental habitsSit in a comfortable position. Relax and alert. 2 min to rest mind on breath.Bring to mind someone you care about. Visualize him or her. FACE THE PERSONJUST LIKE METhis person has a body and a mind, just like meThis person has feelings thoughts and emotions, JLMThis person has, at some point in his or her life, been sad, disappointed, angry, hurt or confused, JLMThis person has, in his or her life, experienced physical and emotional pain and suffering, JLMThis person wishes to be free from pain and suffering, JLMThis person wishes to be healthy and loved, and to have fulfilling relationships, JLMThis person wishes to be happy, JLMLOVING KINDNESSNow, lets allow for some wishes to ariseI wish for this person to have the strength, the resources, and the emotional and social support to navigate the difficulties in life.I wish for this person to be free from pain and sufferingI wish for this person to be happyBecause this person is a fellow human being, just like me(pause) Now I wish for everybody I know to be happy(long pause)End with 1 minute of resting the mind
  • Now it’s up to youWhich way will u choose – NEXT SLIDEStretch yourselfyour comfort zone is where you settle and where/when your dreams dieHope u choose to nurture and grow the leader the compassionate authentic advisor inside youthe first people had the questions and they were free. The second people had the answers and they became enslaved. wind eagleTwo roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fairAnd having perhaps the better claim,Because it was grassy and wanted wear;Though as for that, the passing thereHad worn them really about the same,And both that morning equally layIn leaves no step had trodden blackOh, I kept the first for another day!Yet knowing how way leads on to way,I doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:two roads diverged in a wood, and I –I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.-Robert Frost
  • I hope you choose to Stretch yourselfyour comfort zone is where you settle and where/when your dreams dieNEXT SLIDEHope u choose to nurture and grow the leader the compassionate authentic advisor inside you“Your work is going to fill a large part of your life, and the only wayto be truly satisfied is to do what you believe is great work.And the only way to do great work is to love what you do.If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking, and don’t settle.As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it.“~ Steve Jobs
  • the first people had the questions and they were free. The second people had the answers and they became enslaved. wind eagleWhat will you nurture, what will you focus on? What you focus on will grow. Observer effect Nurture and grow the leader within - inside u - DISCOVER the ideal you!Why a Psychometric Inventory is Critical to your Coaching Strategyhttp://www.anderson-sabourin.com/html/q1_08_.htmlOne of my favorite quantum mechanics stories (and believe me I don't have many) is the thought experiment of Schrödinger's Cat. There are several conclusions that are drawn from the experiment but I think the most significant is the Observer Effect. The term refers to changes that the act of observing will make on the phenomenon being observed. I always think of this phenomenon when engaged in coaching or facilitating one of the Coaching modules in our SLMD program. Who you are effects how you coach. One of the toughest things about coaching effectively is suspending your judgment and keeping the coachee's style and interpersonal skills in mind. We find that TAIS (The Attentional and Interpersonal Style inventory) to be a great advantage for both the coach and the coached. I like to have the TAIS Basic Scale Report in front of me when I'm coaching so that I can look at the situation through the "eyes" of sales person or executive I'm helping. My suggestions and observations are then consistent with the coachee's style and more readily accepted. The key to coaching is embracing the fact that any goal can be accomplished in many ways. Understanding your style and how it effects your team is achievable by utilizing a tool such as TAIS.
  • is a common spoken valediction or salutation originating in the Indian subcontinent. It is a customary greeting when individuals meet, and a valediction upon their parting.Adoration of youhttp://www.scoop.it/t/engaging-students-in-the-21st-centuryhttp://womanmonk.wordpress.com/19-2/Tingshas, are two circular discs with inscriptions that is tied with a leather rope or thick thread. This is used to hit against each other to make music. The sound made by Tingshas is very auspicious and wards off evil spirits and bad omens. India, China and Japan are the eastern countries where Tingshas are very popular and used while chanting prayers or singing hymns. Nowadays it is very popular to heal diseases with color therapy and sound therapy. The lilting sound made by these two circular discs creates positive sound vibrations and cleanse the atmosphere. In India all temples, places of worship and even households have a pair of Tingshas. Famous psychologists have said that “Vibration is the basis of life. Every sound you ever made echoes still. Sound waves never entirely disappear. Every part of our body has its own frequency. Resonance occurs when frequencies come into synchronization. Different frequencies influence genes and cells. Form is created by underlying vibration. A solid is actually a wave, created and organized by pulse. “The sound of Tingshas is like a summons. The pure, ringing sound of the Tingsha creates an opening in the atmosphere. It awakens the dormant spirit within and helps the mind to concentrate on its core job.  It is believed that the Tingshas sound can clear the imbalance present in Nature.  In Tibet Tingshas are used to clear the mind before and after meditation. When you attend a concert with singing bowls, you will come across the penetrating singing sound of Tingshas. Like singing bowls, these small circular discs are considered ritual artifacts. They are used by Buddhist monks but are also used in the Shamanic tradition. Though their origin is not clear they are made from a mix of seven metals, just like singing bowls. In some Tingshas, the iron is replaced by meteorite, the 'celestial' metal which gives the instruments their pearly shine. The inscriptions that are on top of the Tingshas are known as Ashtamangala that is 8 symbols of happiness.Even in India traditional cultural performances use Tingshas to start the prayer. Pundits and pontiffs use Tingshas to chant mantras and sing prayers in praise of God. Basically the sound resonating from the Tingshas clears the mind and helps in concentration. They also help in relaxing the mind and body. After a stressful day the sound of the Tingshas helps in healing the body and mind. These are made in the Himalayan region and should be tested for perfect sound before purchasing Tingshas. A good and perfect Tingsha will have the sound “Om” resonating even after playing it. The sound keeps vibrating after it is played for a long time in the place. Tingshas can be used fo
  • Your life is full of experience! Drink it up! Dive in! Enjoy it all!
  • HOW DO WE BEGIN TRAINING EI – by teaching mindfulness. Or perhaps autogenic training or Christian prayer-word "Maranatha" (come Lord ~our Lord has come) / or LectioDivinaAutogenic training is a relaxation technique similar to the meditation first introduced by German psychiatrist Johannes Schulz in the 1930s. Similar to other relaxation techniques like progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery
  • ALL FULLStory of villager – horse storyThere is a Taoist story of an old farmer who had worked his crops for many years. One day his horse ran away. Upon hearing the news, his neighbors came to visit. "Such bad luck," they said sympathetically. "May be," the farmer replied. The next morning the horse returned, bringing with it three other wild horses. "How wonderful," the neighbors exclaimed. "May be," replied the old man. The following day, his son tried to ride one of the untamed horses, was thrown, and broke his leg. The neighbors again came to offer their sympathy on his misfortune. "May be," answered the farmer. The day after, military officials came to the village to draft young men into the army. Seeing that the son's leg was broken, they passed him by. The neighbors congratulated the farmer on how well things had turned out. "May be," said the farmer. http://users.rider.edu/~suler/zenstory/maybe.htmlYour life is full of experience! Drink it up! Dive in! Enjoy it all!
  • Practice time 4http://www.mindfulnessinfo.comMindful eating scriptPick up a raisin and hold it in the palm of your hand. Look at it. Examine it. Describe the raisin. What does it look like? What color is it? How would you describe the texture? Now, feel the raisin in the palm of your hand. What does it feel like against your skin? Pick it up with your other hand. What does it feel like in your fingers? Is it slimy? Rough? Smooth? Soft? Hard? Squeeze it softly. What do you feel? Smell the raisin. Describe how it smells. Put the raisin in your mouth, but do not eat it. What does it feel like on your tongue? What does the texture feel like now? How does it taste? How does the taste compare to the way it smelled? Move it around in your mouth and notice every aspect of the raisin. Bite the raisin and think about what you taste. Now how does the raisin feel in your mouth? Finish chewing and eat the raisin. How did it taste? Describe the experience of the raisin.This exercise is about cultivating awareness and beginning to learn to focus on the here-and-now. It is about being in the present moment and not missing out on it. Sometimes, much of our anxiety or fear is a result of focusing our thoughts on the future - or the past - and forgetting to be present here in this moment. Right here, in this very moment, those things may not need or deserve our attention.This exercise (or a variation of it) can be done with just about anything. Try a pretzel or a piece of fruit. It can also be done with just about any activity. What would it be like to notice every detail of something that we normally do automatically and without much thought? What would it be like to notice every aspect of brushing your teeth or putting on your shoes? Break the activity down into its most fundamental elements. Be right there in the moment. Notice everything. Be nowhere else. Don't miss right now.Read more: http://www.mindfulnessinfo.com/exercise-2-the-raisin/Create your own website for free: http://www.webnode.com
  • Practice timeMindful Email ScriptBegin by taking one conscious breathMindfully reflect that on the receiving end there are one or more human beings just like mePerhaps do Just Like Me / Loving Kindness ExerciseWrite Your EmailBefore sending, reflect, if the emotional context is unclear, the receiver brain will make something up – probably something not so goodPut yourself in receivers shoes, pretend you have a negative bias, read and repeat last two steps if neededTake one conscious breath before sendingTake Three breaths if the situation is delicateFeel free to change your mind about pressing send
  • Campbell, J., & Christopher, J. (2012). Teaching Mindfulness to Create Effective Counselors. Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 213-226Ponton, R. F. (2012). Mindfulness and Mastery in Counseling: Introduction to the Special Issue. Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 189-196Rothaupt, J. W., & Morgan, M. M. (2007). Counselors' and Counselor Educators' Practice of Mindfulness: A Qualitative Inquiry.Counseling & Values, 52(1), 40-54. Making Minds Matter: Infusing Mindfulness Into School Counseling, TADLOCK-MARLOStauffer, M. D., & Pehrsson, D. (2012). Mindfulness Competencies for Counselors and Psychotherapists. Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 227-239.*Campbell, J., & Christopher, J. (2012). Teaching Mindfulness to Create Effective Counselors. Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 213-226.  ABSTRACT - Over the last decade a number of researchers have proposed that therapeutic presence can be fostered through training in mindfulness practices. Mostcounseling training programs focus on teaching students a set of skills, although the common or contextual factors movement contends that the quality of the therapeutic relationship and the personal characteristics of the therapist are the key determinants of positive therapy outcomes. For the past 10 years we have been teaching mindfulness practices to counselingstudents in a CACREP-accredited program. Our research suggests that training in practices like mindfulness meditation, yoga, qigong, and body-awareness can help counselors to realize and embody the personal characteristics that foster therapeutic presence. This article provides a detailed description of ourmindfulness-based course, proposes recommendations for counselingcoursework in mindfulness, and discusses the impact of the course on the ability to cultivate therapeutic presenceGreason, P., & Cashwell, C. S. (2009). Mindfulness and Counseling Self-Efficacy: The Mediating Role of Attention and Empathy.Counselor Education & Supervision, 49(1), 2-19. This study examined the predictive relationship between mindfulness andcounseling self-efficacy and the potential mediating effects of attention and empathy. Master's-level counseling interns and doctoral counseling students (N = 179) were surveyed to determine levels of mindfulness, attention, empathy, and counseling self-efficacy. Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients revealed significant pairwise relationships between the 4 variables of interest. A multiplemediator path analysis supported the hypotheses thatmindfulness is a significant predictor of counseling self-efficacy and that attention is a mediator of that relationship. Results suggest that mindfulnessmay be an important variable in the development of key counselor preparation outcomes*Schure, M. B., Christopher, J., & Christopher, S. (2008). Mind-Body Medicine and the Art of Self-Care: Teaching Mindfulness to Counseling Students Through Yoga, Meditation, and Qigong.Journal Of Counseling & Development, 86(1), 47-56.Bingaman, K. (2011). The Art of Contemplative and Mindfulness Practice: Incorporating the Findings of Neuroscience into Pastoral Care and Counseling. Pastoral Psychology, 60(3), 477-489. doi:10.1007/s11089-011-0328-9   This article draws on recent neuroscientific research evidence that demonstrates the plasticity and malleability of the human brain to make the case for greater use of contemplative and mindfulness practices in pastoral care and counseling. It explores the negativity bias of the brain as it has evolved and argues that mindful awareness practices have the ability to work against this bias in favor of less fearful and anxious perspectives on life, including interpersonal relationships. Contending for a higher evaluation of Christian practices than beliefs, it specifically targets the doctrine of original sin as a contributor to this negativity bias, and advocates the use of Christian meditative practices, especially the Centering Prayer, as a means to foster brain resculpting that is integral to the experience of becoming aware of oneself as a new creationBlanton, P. P. (2011). The Other Mindful Practice: Centering Prayer & Psychotherapy. Pastoral Psychology, 60(1), 133-147. doi:10.1007/s11089-010-0292-9  review of the literature reveals that one particular form of mindful practice,mindfulness, has received the most research attention during the past decade. While all of this attention has been focused on mindfulness, the clinical usefulness of other mindful practices has been ignored. Built upon this background, the purpose of this article is to bring attention to an overlooked form of mindful practice that grows out of the Christian tradition: Centering Prayer. The article begins with a description of Centering Prayer, along with a comparison with mindfulness. The remainder of the article explores the clinical implications of Centering Prayer. First, ways in which Centering Prayer informs our understanding of the need for and the goals of counseling are suggested. Next, four therapeutic skills of Centering Prayer, along with three distinct ways for integrating Centering Prayer into psychotherapy are offered. Throughout the clinical section of the article, numerous practical ideas and strategies are developed. Finally, a case study is included to illustrate the potential benefits of including Centering Prayer in psychotherapyRothaupt, J. W., & Morgan, M. M. (2007). Counselors' and Counselor Educators' Practice of Mindfulness: A Qualitative Inquiry.Counseling & Values, 52(1), 40-54.  The Buddhist practice of mindfulness is being used more often both to help clients and to facilitate counselor effectiveness. A growing body of research supports these uses of mindfulness. Most authors also emphasize that those who teach mindfulness must also apply it themselves. However, little is known about how counselors and counselor educators incorporatemindfulness into their personal and professional lives. The current study used semistructured interviews to elicit such information from 6 counselors and counselor educators. A constant comparative method was used to analyze the data and synthesize themes. Emergent themes included practices used to cultivate mindfulness and the results of mindfulness practices.Ponton, R. F. (2012). Mindfulness and Mastery in Counseling: Introduction to the Special Issue. Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 189-196.  This introduction to the special issue on mindfulness integrates concepts ofmindfulness with the counselor development literature. Discussing the elements of mindfulness, especially the choice to attend to the experience of the present moment with non judgmental acceptance, it outlines howmindfulness skills can be applied to the practice of counseling and how the mental health counselor develops from novice to expertLeppma, M. (2012). Loving-Kindness Meditation and Counseling.Journal Of Mental Health Counseling, 34(3), 197-204. Loving-kindness meditation (LKM) is a type of mindfulness-based meditation that emphasizes caring and connection with others. LKM incorporates nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment, which enhances attention, presence, acceptance, and self-regulation; it also entails directing caring feelings toward oneself and then others and emphasizes both self-care and inter. connectedness. Thus, LKM is suitable for helping clients forge healthy connections with them- selves and others. This article examines the use and implications of LKM in counselingEdwards, C., Vann-Hawkins, T., & McDougald, C. (2012). It's All Formal: Understanding the Nuances of Mindfulness-Based Practice.Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback, 37(3), 217-218. doi:10.1007/s10484-012-9190-5 Moore, A., Gruber, T., Derose, J., & Malinowski, P. (n.d). Regular, brief mindfulness meditation practice improves electrophysiological markers of attentional control. Frontiers In Human Neuroscience,6Article.Williamson, P. R. (2003). Mindfulness in Medicine, Mindfulness in Life. Families, Systems & Health: The Journal Of Collaborative Family Healthcare, 21(1), 18.Khisty, C. (2010). The Practice of Mindfulness for Managers in the Marketplace. Systemic Practice & Action Research, 23(2), 115-125. doi:10.1007/s11213-009-9151-yRaffone, A., Tagini, A., & Srinivasan, N. (2010). MINDFULNESS AND THE COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF ATTENTION AND AWARENESS. Zygon: Journal Of Religion & Science, 45(3), 627-646. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9744.2010.01118.xEffect of Meditation on the Academic Performance of African American College StudentsHALL, P. D. (1999). The effect of meditation on the academic performance of African American college students. Journal Of Black Studies, 29(3), 408.
  • Achor, S. (2010). The happiness advantage: The seven principles of positive psychology that fuel success and performance at work. New York: Broadway Books.Braza, J. (1997). Moment by moment: The art and practice of mindfulness. Boston: C.E. Tuttle.Carroll, M. (2007). The mindful leader: Ten principles for bringing out the best in ourselves and others. Boston: Trumpeter.Dweck, C. S. (2012). Mindset. London: Robinson.Goleman, D. (2011). The brain and emotional intelligence: New insights. Northampton, MA: More Than Sound.Gunaratana, H. (2002). Mindfulness in plain English. Boston: Wisdom Publications.Rock, D. (2009). Your brain at work: Strategies for overcoming distraction, regaining focus, and working smarter all day long. New York: Harper Business.Siegel, D. J. (2010). Mindsight: The new science of personal transformation. New York: Bantam Books.Tart, C. T. (1994). Living the mindful life. Boston: Shambhala.Wall, B. (2007). Coaching for emotional intelligence: The secret to developing the star potential in your employees. New York: Amacom.Wallace, B. A. (2006). The attention revolution: Unlocking the power of the focused mind. Boston: Wisdom Publications.Williams, M., & Penman, D. (2011). Mindfulness: An eight-week plan for finding peace in a frantic world. Emmaus, Pa: Rodale Books.
  • ReferencesAstin, A.W. (1999). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 40(5), 518-529.Avolio, B. J., & Gardner, W. L. (2005). Authentic leadership development: Getting to the root of positive forms of leadership. Leadership Quarterly,16(3), 315-338. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.001Council for Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, (2012). Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.cas.edu/getpdf.cfm?PDF=E864D2C4-D655-8F74-2E647CDECD29B7D0Council for Advancement of Standards in Higher Education, (2009). Learning and Developmental Outcomes. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.cas.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/Learning-and-Developmental-Outcomes-2009.pdfCrookston, B. (1972). A developmental view of academic advising as teaching. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/documents/14-2-Crookston-pp5-9.pdfDay, D. V., Gronn, P., & Salas, E. (2004). Leadership capacity in teams. Leadership Quarterly, 15(6), 857-880. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2004.09.001Frankl, V (1984). Man's Search for Meaning. An Introduction to Logotherapy, Boston: BeaconGardner, W. L., Avolio, B. J., Luthans, F., May, D. R., & Walumbwa, F. (2005). "Can you see the real me?" A self-based model of authentic leader and follower development. Leadership Quarterly, 16(3), 343-372. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.003Gardner, W. L., Cogliser, C. C., Davis, K. M., & Dickens, M. P. (2011). Authentic leadership: A review of the literature and research agenda. Leadership Quarterly, 22(6), 1120-1145. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2011.09.007Gardner, W. L., & Schermerhorn Jr., J. R. (2004). Unleashing Individual Potential Performance Gains Through Positive Organizational Behavior and Authentic Leadership. Organizational Dynamics, 33(3), 270-281. doi:10.1016/j.orgdyn.2004.06.004Gladwell, M. (2005). Blink: The power of thinking without thinking. New York: Little, Brown and Co.Gordon, V.N., Habley, W.R., & Grites, T.J. (Eds.). (2000). Academic advising: A Comprehensive handbook (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Greenleaf, R. K. (1970). The servant as leader. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.leadershiparlington.org/pdf/TheServantasLeader.pdfHurt, R. L. (2007). Advising as Teaching: Establishing Outcomes, Developing Tools, and Assessing Student Learning. NACADA Journal,27(2), 36-40.Ilgen, DR; Hollenbeck, JR; Johnson, M; Jundt, D (2005). TEAMS IN ORGANIZATIONS: From Input-Process-Output Models to IMOI Models. ANNUAL REVIEW OF PSYCHOLOGY, 56 Pages: 517-543 DOI: 10.1146/annurev.psych.56.091103.070250 Kuh, G. D. and P. G. Love (2000). Part II: New Theoretical Directions: A Cultural Perspective on Student Departure, Vanderbilt University Press: 196-212.Kuh, G.D., Hu, S., & Vesper, N. (2000). “They shall be known by what they do”: An activities-based typology of college students. Journal of College Student Development, 41, 228-244.Martin, R. A. (2005). Is laughter the best medicine? humor, laughter, and physical health. In () Pearson Education. http://search.proquest.com/docview/36811238?accountid=11652McClellan, J. L. (2007). The Advisor as Servant: The Theoretical and Philosophical Relevance of Servant Leadership to Academic Advising. NACADA Journal, 27(2), 41-49.McGrath, J. E., Arrow, H., & Berdahl, J. L. (2000). The Study of Groups: Past, Present, and Future. Personality & Social Psychology Review (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates), 4(1), 95-105.Muraskin, L., Lee, J., & Pell Inst. for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education, W. C. (2004). Raising the Graduation Rates of Low-Income College Students, Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education. [This report was written with Abigail Wilner and Watson Scott Swail.]National Academic Advising Association. (2006). NACADA statement of core values of academic advising. Retrieved from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Clearinghouse/AdvisingIssues/Concept-Advising.htmNorthouse, P. (2007). Leadership theory and practice. (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.Nutt, C. (2012). Academic Advising and student retention and persistence. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/clearinghouse/advisingissues/retention.htmNowaczyk, R. (2012). Clarion University of Pennsylvania Academic Strategic Plan. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.clarion.edu/325829.pdf.Obama, B. (2012). . Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/education/Salas, E., Sims, D. E., & Burke, C. S. (2005). Is there a "big five" in teamwork? Small Group Research, 36(5), 555-599. doi:10.1177/1046496405277134Sansone, C., Morf, C., Panter, A. (2004). The Sage Handbook of Methods in Social Psychology (Lewin’s Equation B=f(PE) Sage Publications, Inc; 1 edition (July 22, 2003) Thousand Oaks CAWhitney, K. (2011). 500 Day Plan. Retrieved May 2012 from http://www.clarion.edu/306350.pdf
  • HOW DO WE BEGIN TRAINING EI – by teaching mindfulness.Or perhaps autogenic training or Christian prayer-word "Maranatha" (come Lord ~our Lord has come) / or LectioDivinaAutogenic training is a relaxation technique similar to the meditation first introduced by German psychiatrist Johannes Schulz in the 1930s. Similar to other relaxation techniques like progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery
  • Many things Oprah does, she does for the benefit of the public. This EI & M information is meant to optimize your lifehttp://static.oprah.com/download/pdfs/presents/2007/spa/spa_meditate_cultivate.pdf Jon's guide on how to start a meditation practicehttp://static.oprah.com/download/pdfs/presents/2007/spa/spa_meditate_daily.pdf Jon's guide on incorporating daily mindfulness exercises into your lifehttp://www.oprah.com/spirit/Mindfulness-Meditation-by-Jon-Kabat-Zinnhttp://www.oprah.com/oprahradio/Jon-Kabat-Zinn-on-Oprahs-Soul-Series-Webcast Salloway 1999The narratives contain a variety of working definitions of mindfulness practice in the classroom. The following examples demonstrate this variety:Opening up the space of my mind, so I’m there with the student, or with many students, but without baggage, without any expectations or memories, just an openness so I’m ready to respond (Sid)Going into this, relaxed state, bringing yourself back to that state, you know, when you do feel anxiety or the pressures of your class. It means not only focusing on yourself, but still being aware of what is going on. It ‘s being able to sit in the middle of it and still be your entity and still be a part of the overall. (Max)It seems like it’s perfect. It’s exactly what you need and you’re taking each step…you can just go right on to the next one because this one’s been taken care of and you’re comfortable with it. You don’t have to look around, you don’t have to be worried about anything else, you just take care of each thing as it happens and that’s enough. It just makes everything fit. It just slows way down and everything takes care of itself. (Fay)When I’m being mindful, I trust that the best thing, that positive things are going to come of it. We’re both going to be there and we’re going to contribute and something bigger than both of us might come about. It’s like just letting what is possible happen, whatever that is. (Mackensie)Being conscious that you’re having a nice conversation or you know other kinds of moments like that, that we take for granted. (Sara)Like being on vacation, a free feeling, like I’m kind of floating, a wonderful sensation. A real relaxation, right there in class with all the kids and everything going on. I was still there, but it was like I wasn’t actually in the body, because my body felt so light, not heavy and tight. And I was so aware of everything I was doing, and they were doing, but all of it was easy not hard and tight. (Fay)It’s like sunshine. It’s like a bright light…It was just like there was a path, like a bright light and it’s just you and me and nobody else. It was like there was a box, just like the quiet time and you’re hearing only them, or like you know, how the music is on those pastoral things where the water trickles, it’s like that. (Jane)
  • Tao de HaasMake three slideshttp://community.tncc.edu/faculty/dollieslager/ei.htmlhttp://www.successinteaching.info/SuccessInTeaching/Emotional_Intelligence.htmlhttp://www.sonoma.edu/users/s/swijtink/teaching/philosophy_101/paper1/goleman.htm
  • TRASH???ListenListen intentlyDo you think this guy really is involved in, interested in, hearing the answerDo you think he’s feelin it??When you ask a question, how do you listen?Asking questions a & Listening is a big part of reflectingTransforming Leadership: The Story of Robert Greenleaf -by D E B O R A H V O G E L E W E L C HGreenleaf was intuitively drawn tolead in a different way. During his timewith AT&T, he incorporated certainleadership practices in his work.• Deep Listening and Powerful Questions.Greenleaf helped peoplediscover their own greatness by askingpowerful questions.“True listeningbuilds strength in people,” he said. Bychoosing to listen, you assume “a healingattitude with faith that anotherwill rise to the challenge.”Joseph Distephano, one ofGreenleaf ’s mentees, recounts,“Wewould talk about ideas; I would askhim two or three questions; he wouldturn them around on me with Rogerianskill, and he’d hold me accountablefor them at the next meeting.” Greenleaffocused not on giving advice, buton asking deeper questions so thatothers would access greater wisdomand “become convinced in their ownhearts for their own reasons.”• Co-Creativity. Greenleaf also recognizedresistance to change in organizationsand observed,“People don’tchange a habit just because theyknow a better way.”To support thechange process, he developed “studyteams,” an early form of actionresearch, so employees could learnfrom each other.Greenleaf later discussed thisapproach to change with his son,Newcomb.“Suppose you had a reallygood idea? How would you go abouttrying to get it accepted? Here’s howI learned to do it. First, decide whothe key people are in getting itadopted.Then, tell them the idea butonly a bit at a time.” He explainedthat eventually others would “come toan idea on their own.”“But,” his sonasked,“how will they know it wasyour idea?”“They’ll never know,” BobGreenleaf answered—as if that werethe core beauty of the stratagem.“All great things are created fortheir own sake,” Greenleaf wrote,quoting Robert Frost. Paradoxically,by giving over his ego, he became alegend at AT&T. His humility wasbased on knowing who he was, hisdeepest identity.
  • Nothing wrong w/ planning or recalling - reflectingWhen you want to listen to your daughter describe her day at school,When you want to listen to your adviseeDriving a carAbility to stay in present as opposed to being lost or pulled in another direction SATIThe famous Vietnamese Zen master ThichNhatHanh defined mindfulness very poetically as “keeping one’s consciousness alive to the present reality.
  • TRASHhttp://liveinthenameoflove.blogspot.com/2010/01/great-man-and-one-sentence.htmlIn 1962, Luce met with President Kennedy, who was, at the time, pursuing an ambitious agenda domestically and overseas. She worried about his thinly spread priorities. A great man, she advised him, is one sentence. President Lincoln's sentence was obvious: He preserved the union and freed the slaves. So was Franklin D. Roosevelt's: He lifted us out of a great depression and helped us win a world war. What, Luce challenged the young, impatient president, what do be his sentence?What a powerful question--not just for great presidents, but for normal folks, too. What will our legacy be? How will our one sentence change history? As you prepare for another year (probably as tough and trying as last year), remember what Clare Booth Luce asked of a president: What's your sentence?What’s your story? A life-stories approach to authentic leadership development by B. Shamir & G. Eilam 2005, Leadership Quarterly, 16, 395-417INTRAPERSONAL PERSPECTIVEThe authors suggest four Authentic Leadership characteristics that form basis of Intrapersonal Perspective: Authentic Leaders exhibit genuine leadership. Authentic Leaders Lead from conviction. Authentic leaders are original, not copies. Authentic leaders base their actions on their values. Followers also play a role in the story of AL too. Followers need to have realistic perceptions of their leaders, and they need to affirm the legitimacy of the leader and the leaders behavior (Shamir & Eilam 2005- Northouse)a field in infancyfast-growingIdentified earlier in transformational leadership research but never fully articulated (Bass, 1990, Bass & Steidlemeir 99, burns 78, Howell & Avolio 93)The capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.
  • Sankofa an Akan word which means to return and recover it –MaulanaKarengaIt comes from the Ghanaian proverb meaning to look back to your past to bring understanding to your futureAccording to Niangoran-Bouah the bird is a symbol representing the quest for knowledge and the return to the sourceIntroduce the journal as a tool
  • Search reflective practice
  • SIYStart by creating an intention – reduce stress, increase well being, maybe you want to cultivate your emotional intelligence for fun and profit, or maybe you just want to create the conditions for world peace or somethingThis is even more powerful when your intention is toward the well-being of others. After creating the intention, follow your breathYour Attention may gather and your mind is calm and concentratedCruising right along, in the flow & then DistractionRuminate, worry, fantasize, Sometimes, I even fantasize about not worrying. After a while, we realize our attention has wandered away. The default reaction of most people at this point is self-criticism. We start telling ourselves stories about how horrible we are as meditators and, by extension, not particularly good people either. Happily, there is a skillful way to deal with thisThe first thing to do is to simply regain attentional focus by bringing attention back to the process of breathingThe second thing to do is to realize this process of bringing a wandering attention back is like flexing your biceps during your gym workout. This is not failure; it is the process of growth and developing powerful mental “muscles.The third thing to do is to become aware of your attitude toward yourself. See how you treat yourself and how often you engage in nasty gossip about yourself. If possible, shift the attitude toward self-directed kindness and curiosityAdopt the mind of loving grandmother
  • advising – when you develop the skills necessary for EI and you practice mindfulness you can be more present during the session and hear the student/client more completely. A better understanding will hopefully lead to better guidance.Advising presenceAdvisor resilience
  • WCCC advising presentation draft

    1. 1. Mindful, Authentic Advising. Will it help you and your students be more successful?
    2. 2. Seek & you shall find Process Model for Student Completion Define academic advising Identify best practices & discuss various strategies Something to help you and your students be successful? How can emotional intelligence and mindfulness work together to make me into the best authentic advisor for each student?
    3. 3. CAS ~ Habley  Advising bears the distinction of being the only structured activity on campus in which all students have the opportunity for on-going, one-to-one interaction with a concerned representative of the institution, and this fact is a source of its tremendous potential today (NACADA, 2005).  This coupled with increasing educational options, has brought pressure to make the student educational experiences as meaningful as possible.
    4. 4. Concept of Academic Advising Academic advising, based in the teaching and learning mission of higher education, is a series of intentional interactions with a curriculum, a pedagogy, and a set of student learning outcomes. Academic advising synthesizes and contextualizes students’ educational experiences within the frameworks of their aspirations, abilities and lives to extend learning beyond campus boundaries and timeframes.
    5. 5. Define…  “Academic advisors help students become members of their higher education community, think critically about their roles and responsibilities as students, and prepare to be educated citizens of a democratic society and global community.”  “Academic advising - done well- assists students in interpreting their values, beliefs, and experiences, so, unlike Alice, they get somewhere they want to go.” Drake, J. K., Jordan, P., & Miller, M. A. (2013). Academic advising approaches: Strategies that teach students to make the most of college .
    6. 6. Influential Research Articles / Books  Bean, J. P., & Eaton, S. (2000). Part I: Revising Tinto's Theory: A Psychological Model of College Student Retention. In , Reworking the Student Departure Puzzle (pp. 48-61). Vanderbilt University Press.  Kuh, G. D., & Documenting Effective Educational Practice (Project). (2005). Student success in college: Creating conditions that matter. San Francisco: JosseyBass.  Tinto, V. (2012). Leaving college: Rethinking the causes and cures of student attrition. Chicago, Ill: University of Chicago Press.
    7. 7. Advising & Leading Josephson (1988) argues that ethical academic advising is based on similar relationships characterized by trust, worthy objectives and student development (as cited by Frank in Gordon, 2000). The Core Values of NACADA as cited by Creamer in Gordon (2000) relate to all three of these points. The Core Values stress the purpose of academic advising, which is student learning and personal development. The focus of advising is the student as a whole, encompassing the students educational life as well as future plans after graduation (Creamer, 2000). Nutt argues that academic advising at its very best is a supportive and interactive relationship between students and advisors built on shared communication (Nutt in Gordon, 2000).
    8. 8. WCCC Process Model for Student Completion PURPOSE: To implement an admissions, intake, advising and registration process that provides effective interventions for students with diverse goals and needs in order to facilitate desired outcomes for degree completion, transfer and/or job placement. Stage 1: Pre-Degree Status Cohort: Goal: Providers: Process: All new credit students who intend to pursue a degree, diploma or certificate Registration yield ratio of 90% of Admitted students SSSA’s All new degree, diploma, and certificate students (full and part time) will be admitted as pre-degree students. For example, a student who intends to major in Accounting will be coded as Pre-Accounting, etc. New students are assigned for placement testing and their initial registration to the SSSA’s. The SSSA’s do a brief “mini-orientation” that covers essential information to get started, administers placement tests, and registers students for initial semester. Registrations should focus on developmental courses if required, Gatekeeper, general education requirements, and first semester courses of student’s intended major. Registrations for certificate students should focus on first semester courses for the certificate at this stage. The goal for the SSSA’s is limited and focused upon getting new students tested, registered and ready to start classes.
    9. 9. Process Model for Student Completion Stage 2: Advancing to Degree Status Cohort: Goal: Providers: Process: Note: All pre-degree students, after initial semester, with less than 12 credits (excluding developmental courses) To advance 80% of pre-degree students to degree status. Degree Status: Students who have completed all required developmental courses, completed at least 12 credits, with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0, and have been accepted into a degree, certificate or diploma program. Counselors After initial registration, students are assigned to a counselor. Some consideration may be given to counselors’ area of specialty, such as transfer, but all counselors should be assigned students from any major. The counselors’ goal is to facilitate the student achieving degree status. Counselors will need to employ multi-faceted personal and/or group interventions. Some will need assistance to achieve a satisfactory GPA, others will need guidance regarding transfer options, some will need to learn methods of test-taking and study skills. Still others will need career exploration. This stage is an opportunity to focus our counseling resources to enable students to get beyond this critical stage. Students who are admitted to Nursing or other health programs with stipulated requirements, achieve degree status upon their admission to the program.
    10. 10. Process Model for Student Completion Stage 3: Degree Status Cohort: Goal: Providers: Process: COMPLETION TARGET: All students who have achieved degree status in a particular major. Advance 90% of cohort to completion of degree, diploma, certificate, or transfer out. Faculty Advisors Upon admittance to degree status, student is assigned a faculty advisor in the student’s major or area of concentration. At this stage, the student’s probability of successful completion is much improved. The faculty/student advising relationship should focus upon completing major and degree requirements, exploring career options, and selecting courses that most enable student to achieve career goals. This should be an opportunity for the student to establish a meaningful mentor relationship with a faculty advisor and through that relationship become more fully engaged with the structure and concepts of the major beyond satisfaction of course requirements. If goals at each stage are met, the entering cohort will obtain a completion rate (degree, diploma, certificate or transfer out) of 65%. This would triple the existing completion rate.
    11. 11. 2003 NACADA Certification Task Force  Recommends that advisor training should address     three areas: Conceptual: What concepts like developmental advising do advisors need to know? Informational: What do advisors need to know about in-house programs and policies. Relational: What skills do advisors need to relate effectively with their advisees? (p. 293) - See more at: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/View-Articles/AdvisorTraining--Development.aspx#sthash.k4K3CKke.dpuf
    12. 12. Advising Skills Required - NACADA  Advisors must communicate and engage students via skills in:     Interpersonal relations Communication Helping Problem Solving  NACADA recently created a book to provide a curriculum to teach advisors theory and practice of various methods – Academic Advising Approaches
    13. 13. Core values of academic advising - NACADA
    14. 14. Core values of academic advising - NACADA  1) Advisors are responsible to the individuals they      advise. 2) Advisors are responsible for involving others, when appropriate, in the advising process. 3) Advisors are responsible to their institutions. 4) Advisors are responsible to higher education. 5) Advisors are responsible to their educational community. 6) Advisors are responsible for their professional practices and for themselves personally.
    15. 15. NACADA  NACADA’s new book:  Academic Advising Approaches: Strategies that teach students to make the most of college  Variety of perspectives to shed light on advising practices
    16. 16. Chapters in Academic Advising Approaches  Motivational Interviewing  Appreciative Advising  Strengths-Based Advising  Self-authorship based Advising  Proactive Advising  Advising as Coaching  Socratic Advising  Hermeneutic Approach  Constructivism and Systems Theory
    17. 17. Advising Learning Outcomes  However, a representative sample of learning outcomes for advising          indicates that students will  craft a coherent educational plan based on assessment of abilities, aspirations, interests, and values;  use complex information from various sources to set goals, reach decisions, and achieve those goals;  assume responsibility for meeting academic program requirements;  articulate the meaning of higher education and the intent of the institution’s curriculum;  cultivate the intellectual habits that lead to a lifetime of learning; and  behave as citizens who engage in the wider world around them (NACADA, 2006, para. 10).
    18. 18. And yet another way to relate to students  Authentic Advising  Authentic Leadership  Emotional Intelligence  Mindfulness
    19. 19. Authentic Advising: When one endeavors to skillfully apply mindfulness practices to enhance their emotional intelligence, one may become an effective authentic advisor. An authentic advisor aids others in cultivating these skills.
    20. 20. Mindfulness  15,200,000 hits on Google  99,500 articles Google Scholar  6,987 books in Amazon  Effect of Meditation on the Academic Performance of African American College Students HALL, P. D. (1999). Everywhere and at all times, it is up to you to rejoice piously at what is occurring in the present moment, to conduct yourself with justice towards the people who are present here and now. - Marcus Aurelius
    21. 21. Mindfulness Definition Paying attention in a particular way, on purpose, in the present moment, and nonjudgmentally. Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever you go, there you are: Mindfulness meditation in everyday life. New York: Hyperion..
    22. 22. Mindfulness Benefits  Mindfulness improves well being  Mindfulness improves physical health  Mindfulness improves mental health  http://www.helpguide.org/harvard/mindfulness.htm  Happiness – the default state of mind
    23. 23. Emotional Intelligence  Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer- They define emotional intelligence as: The ability to monitor one’s own and others’ feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one’s thinking and action Salovey, P., & Mayer, J. D. (1989). Emotional intelligence. Imagination, cognition and personality, 9(3), 185-211.  Daniel Goleman popularized the topic with his book entitled Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ
    24. 24. Authentic Leadership Self-Assessment Questionnaire Instructions: This questionnaire contains items about different dimensions of authentic leadership. There are no right or wrong responses, so please answer honestly. Use the following scale when responding to each statement by writing the number from the scale below that you feel most accurately characterizes your response to the statement. Key: 1 = S trongly disagree 2 = Disagree 3 = Neutral 4 = Agree 1. I can list my three greatest weaknesses. 2. My actions reflect my core values. 3. I seek others’ opinions before making up my own mind. 4. I openly share my feelings with others. 5. I can list my three greatest strengths. 6. I do not allow group pressure to control me. 7. I listen closely to the ideas of those who disagree with me. 8. I let others know who I truly am as a person. 9. I seek feedback as a way of understanding who I really am as a person. 10. Other people know where I stand on controversial issues. 11. I do not emphasize my own point of view at the expense of others. 12. I rarely present a “false” front to others. 13. I accept the feelings I have about myself. 14. My morals guide what I do as a leader. 15. I listen very carefully to the ideas of others before making decisions. 16. I admit my mistakes to others. To obtain this instrument, contact Mind Garden Inc., www.mindgarden.com 5= S trongly agree 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 1 2 3 4 5
    25. 25. SIY at www.siyli.org
    26. 26. Be Authentic
    27. 27. Leaders all over the planet are beginning to understand the benefits of purposefully learning to be more attentive and focused, nonreactive, and clear." —Saki Santorelli, EdD, Executive Director, Center for Mindfulness
    28. 28. Emotional intelligence competencies Social Skills Empathy Motivation Self-Regulation Self-Awareness
    29. 29. Dimensions of Emotional Intelligence 1. Self-awareness: Knowledge of one’s internal states, preferences, resources, and intuitions 2. Self-regulation: Management of one’s internal states, impulses, and resources 3. Motivation: Emotional tendencies that guide or facilitate reaching goals 4. Empathy: Awareness of others’ feelings, needs, and concerns 5. Social skills: Adeptness at inducing desirable responses in others
    30. 30. Yes, very nice, but what can emotional intelligence do for me? Stellar work performance Outstanding leadership Ability to create the conditions for happiness
    31. 31. Most cited job skills in academic advising Interpersonal skills Teaching skills or excellent skills in public speaking Coordination, planning and organizational skills Excellent computer skills Effective communication skills particularly with diverse populations. Ability to build good rapport with a variety of constituents 6. Service oriented attitude 7. Ability to learn easily and disseminate detailed information 8. Ability to work independently and collaboratively with others or in teams 9. Good attention to details 10. Ability to work with complex systems in a fast-paced and dynamic environment 11. Flexible, patient, creative 12. Skills in problem solving 13. Good sense of humor  - See more at: http://www.nacada.ksu.edu/Resources/Clearinghouse/ViewArticles/Become-an-Advisor.aspx#sthash.ELvFP51P.dpuf 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
    32. 32. Emotional Intelligence is Trainable
    33. 33. Examples  Response to triggers  Difficult conversations  Confidence during stress
    34. 34. Neuroplasticity  Old School Belief -Can’t teach an old dog new tricks…  Today we know differently
    35. 35. Attention  What we pay attention to changes the brain  Intention  Attitude  Attention
    36. 36. Mindfulness is Excellent Education  William James, the father of modern psychology, had this to say: And the faculty of voluntarily bringing back a wandering attention over and over again is the very root of judgment, character, and will. No one is compos sui (competent) if he have it not. An education which should improve this faculty would be the education par excellence  James, Principles of Psychology, Chap 11 http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/James/Principles/prin11.htm
    37. 37. Attention  What we pay attention to changes the brain  Intention  Attention  Attitude
    38. 38. http://www.mindfulness-matters.org/what-is-mindfulness/
    39. 39. Amygdala
    40. 40. Amygdala
    41. 41.  Emotion is a basic physiological state characterized by identifiable autonomic or bodily changes. -Laura Delizonna via siyli.org
    42. 42. Body Language
    43. 43. Why bring mindfulness to the body?  Correlates of emotion in the body are much more vivid than those in the brain.
    44. 44. Psychoneuroimmunology DOPAMINE NEUROPEPTIDES
    45. 45. Applications and Benefits  Pause, notice thoughts and emotions  Mindfulness in daily activities  Recover from distraction  Emotion stabilization
    46. 46. When?
    47. 47. Self-awareness, self-regulation, and self-transcendence (SART): a framework for understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness David R. Vago* and David A. Silbersweig
    48. 48. Scientific Definition of Meditation  Meditation refers to a family of mental training practices that are designed to familiarize the practitioner with specific types of mental processes.
    49. 49. Learning meditation is like …learning to ride bike
    50. 50. Mind like snow globe Serenity: stillness, calmness, peace Mindfulness: clarity alertness Happiness
    51. 51. self-awareness internalized moral perspective - base their actions on their values balanced processing exhibit genuine leadership-relational transparency
    52. 52. The effective interaction between advisor and student is very important to the individual growth and success of students (Kramer, as cited in Gordon, 2000).
    53. 53. Mindfulness Emotional Intelligence Authentic Advising
    54. 54. Authentic Advising Mindfulness Emotional Intelligence Authentic Leadership
    55. 55. Back to mindfulness “What you focus on you become. So always focus on the highest, brightest, happiest and most noble of all things – Enlightenment.” ~ Rama (Dr. Frederick Lenz) “Mindfulness practice is simple and completely feasible. Just by sitting and doing nothing, we are doing a tremendous amount.” Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche
    56. 56. MINDFULNESS IS A MIRROR OF WHAT’S HAPPENING IN THE PRESENT MOMENT The Mindful Child by Susan Kaiser Greenland
    57. 57. BELIEVE THERE IS GOOD IN THE WORLD
    58. 58. Thank you! Joseph Croskey josephcroskey@gmail.com 814-673-3686
    59. 59. Controversy  What religion is it?  Is it just googley moogley?  Is it just good for me personally?  I’m not stressed why would I need it?  What other concerns?  What is your main motivation for being in this session today?
    60. 60. Trying a Short Mindfulness Meditation Your capacity to be mindful is most powerfully developed through mindfulness meditation. One of the most popular mindfulness meditations is mindfulness of breath. This involves being mindfully aware of your breath. Follow these steps to try mindfulness meditation out for yourself: 1.Be aware of the sense of your own breathing. You don’t need to change the rate of your breath. Just feel the physical sensation of your breath entering and leaving the body. 2.You can feel the breath in the nose, the throat, the chest or down in your belly. If possible, try and feel the breath in the belly as it’s more grounding and is more likely to make you feel relaxed. 3.When your mind wonders off into thoughts, bring your attention back. It is the nature of thoughts to take your attention away from whatever you want to focus on, and into thoughts about the past or future, worries or dreams. Don’t worry about it. 4.As soon as you realise that you’ve been thinking about something else, notice what you were thinking about, and gently guide your attention back to your breath. You don’t need to criticise yourself. That’s it. Mindfulness of breath is as simple as that. Bring a sense of the mindful attitudes to your experience such as curiosity, kindness and acceptance. You can do this exercise for as short as a minute, or as long as an hour.
    61. 61. References           George, B. (2010). True north: Discover your authentic leadership (Vol. 143). Wiley. com. Goldin, P. R., & Gross, J. J. (2010). Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) on emotion regulation in social anxiety disorder. Emotion,10(1), 83. Goleman, D. (1995). Emotional intelligence. New York: Bantam Books. James, Principles of Psychology, Chap 11 http://psychclassics.yorku.ca/James/Principles/prin11.htm Kabat-Zinn, J. (1994). Wherever you go, there you are: Mindfulness meditation in everyday life. New York: Hyperion Lesser, M. (2013). Know yourself, forget yourself: Five truths to transform your work, relationships, and everyday life. Novato, Calif: New World Library. Salovey, P., & Mayer, J. D. (1989). Emotional intelligence. Imagination, cognition and personality, 9(3), 185-211. Shapiro, S. L., Jazaieri, H., & Goldin, P. R. (2012). Mindfulness-based stress reduction effects on moral reasoning and decision making. Journal Of Positive Psychology, 7(6), 504-515. doi:10.1080/17439760.2012.723732 Tan, C.-M. (2012). Search inside yourself: The unexpected path to achieving success, happiness (and world peace). New York: HarperOne. Walumbwa, F. O., Avolio, B. J., Gardner, W. L., Wernsing, T. S., & Peterson, S. J. (2008). Authentic Leadership: Development and Validation of a Theory-Based Measure. Journal Of Management, 34(1), 89-126.
    62. 62. Suggested Reading / References  Davidson, R. J., & Begley, S. (2012). The emotional life of your brain: How       its unique patterns affect the way you think, feel, and live--and how you can change them. New York: Hudson Street Press. Nhât, H., Ho, M., & Vo, D. M. (1987). The miracle of mindfulness: An introduction to the practice of meditation. Boston: Beacon Press. Palmer, P. J., Zajonc, A., & Scribner, M. (2010). The heart of higher education: A call to renewal : transforming the academy through collegial conversations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Seligman, M. E. P. (2011). Flourish. North Sydney, N.S.W: Random House Australia. Smalley, S. L., & Winston, D. (2010). Fully present: The science, art, and practice of mindfulness. Cambridge, Mass.: Da Capo Lifelong. Stone, D., Patton, B., & Heen, S. (1999). Difficult conversations: How to discuss what matters most. New York, N.Y: Viking. Zajonc, A. (2009). Meditation as contemplative inquiry: When knowing becomes love. Great Barrington, Mass: Lindisfarne Books.
    63. 63. More References         Astin, A.W. (1999). Student involvement: A developmental theory for higher education. Journal of College Student Development, 40(5), 518-529. Avolio, B. J., & Gardner, W. L. (2005). Authentic leadership development: Getting to the root of positive forms of leadership. Leadership Quarterly,16(3), 315-338. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.001 Frankl, V (1984). Man's Search for Meaning. An Introduction to Logotherapy, Boston: Beacon Gardner, W. L., Avolio, B. J., Luthans, F., May, D. R., & Walumbwa, F. (2005). "Can you see the real me?" A self-based model of authentic leader and follower development. Leadership Quarterly, 16(3), 343-372. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.003 Gardner, W. L., Cogliser, C. C., Davis, K. M., & Dickens, M. P. (2011). Authentic leadership: A review of the literature and research agenda. Leadership Quarterly, 22(6), 1120-1145. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2011.09.007 Gardner, W. L., & Schermerhorn Jr., J. R. (2004). Unleashing Individual Potential Performance Gains Through Positive Organizational Behavior and Authentic Leadership. Organizational Dynamics, 33(3), 270-281. doi:10.1016/j.orgdyn.2004.06.004 Gordon, V.N., Habley, W.R., & Grites, T.J. (Eds.). (2000). Academic advising: A Comprehensive handbook (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. McClellan, J. L. (2007). The Advisor as Servant: The Theoretical and Philosophical Relevance of Servant Leadership to Academic Advising. NACADA Journal, 27(2), 41-49.  http://www.siyli.org/learn-more/videos/  MORE
    64. 64. Online References  http://www.siyli.org/  http://www.contemplativemind.org/programs/acmhe  http://www.mindfuled.org/  http://marc.ucla.edu/  http://www.mindandlife.org/  http://www.mindfulexperience.org/  http://www.contemplativeoutreach.org/  http://content.time.com/time/interactive/0,31813,2028999, 00.html Happiness Test  http://www.oprah.com/packages/your-happiness-plan.html  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/gps-mindfulnessresearch/
    65. 65. Practices
    66. 66. Change Anything: The new science of personal success. By Kerry Patterson, (2011). CHANGE ANYTHING Motivation Ability Personal Link to Mission and Values Overinvest in Skill Building Social Harness Peer Pressure Create Social Support Structural Align Rewards and Assure Accountability Change the Environment Joseph Grenny, David Maxfield and Andrew Shimberg Fall 2008 MIT Sloan Management Review, How to Have Influence http://sloanreview.mit.edu/article/how-to-have-influence/
    67. 67. http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Mindfulness-Meditation-by-Jon-Kabat-Zinn Jon Kabat-Zinn's guide on how to start a meditation practice http://static.oprah.com/download/pdfs/presents/2007/spa/spa_meditate_cultivate.pdf
    68. 68. ALQ To obtain this instrument, contact Mind Garden Inc., www.mindgarden.com Authentic Leadership Self-Assessment Questionnaire Instructions: This questionnaire contains items about different dimensions of authentic leadership. There are no right or wrong responses, so please answer honestly. Use the following scale when responding to each statement by writing the number from the scale below that you feel most accurately characterizes your response to the statement. Key: 1 = S trongly disagree 2 = Disagree 3 = Neutral 4 = Agree 1. I can list my three greatest weaknesses. 2. My actions reflect my core values. 3. I seek others’ opinions before making up my own mind. 4. I openly share my feelings with others. 5. I can list my three greatest strengths. 6. I do not allow group pressure to control me. 7. I listen closely to the ideas of those who disagree with me. 8. I let others know who I truly am as a person. 9. I seek feedback as a way of understanding who I really am as a person. 10. Other people know where I stand on controversial issues. 11. I do not emphasize my own point of view at the expense of others. 12. I rarely present a “false” front to others. 13. I accept the feelings I have about myself. 14. My morals guide what I do as a leader. 15. I listen very carefully to the ideas of others before making decisions. 16. I admit my mistakes to others. 5= S trongly agree 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Chapter 11 Authentic Leadership 281 Total Scores S elf-Awareness: ______ Internalized Moral Perspective: _____ Balanced Processing: _____ Relational Transparency: _____ 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 1 2 3 4 5 Scoring 1. S the responses on items 1, 5, 9, and 13 (self-awareness). um Scoring Interpretation This self-assessment questionnaire is designed to measure your authentic leadership by assessing four components of the process: self-awareness, internalized moral perspective, balanced processing, and relational transparency. By comparing your scores on each of these components, you can determine which are your stronger and which are your weaker components in each category. You can interpret your authentic leadership scores using the following guideline: high = 16–20 and low = 15 and below. S cores in the upper range indicate stronger authentic leadership, whereas scores in the lower range indicate weaker authentic leadership. 2. S um the responses on items 2, 6, 10, and 14 (internalized moral perspective). 3. S the responses on items 3, 7, 11, and 15 (balanced processing). um Northouse, P. G. (2007). Leadership: Theory and practice. Thousand Oaks: SAGE Publications
    69. 69. Emotional intelligence model Who I am Personal Competency What I do Self Awareness Vision Values Beliefs Social Competency Self Management Self-motivation Self-regulation EMPAT HY Awareness of Others Relationship Management Understanding Knowledge/skills Empowered Human Being Increased Resilience Decreased Stress Increased satisfaction Increased Intuition Self-fulfillment/actualization Cooperation Collaboration Building rapport Better decisions Win/win outcomes More meaningful connections Bottom line benefits Improving and fulfilling personal and professional relationships Gaining better insights = better decisions = better outcomes Improving effectiveness as leader /manager Increasing efficiency = profit Tao de Haas 2005
    70. 70. When?
    71. 71. “To study the Way is to study the self. To study the self is to forget the self. To forget the self is to be enlightened by all things. To be enlightened by all things is to remove the barriers between one's self and others.” (Dogen, 2002)
    72. 72. Authentic Leaders: • • • • exhibit genuine leadership lead from conviction original, not copies base their actions on their values
    73. 73. http://www.mindfulness-matters.org/what-is-mindfulness/
    74. 74. The Surprising Source of Great Results: Attention and Mindfulness http://www.ormsby.at/en/attention-mindfulness-results/
    75. 75. Self Others Context Emotional Intelligence

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