Rollins College At South Lake Nona District

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Proposal for a new Rollins College South Lake Nona District Campus. Analysis, Design, and Development Program.

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Rollins College At South Lake Nona District

  1. 1. UrbanPlanners +DesignersTKA& Co.
  2. 2. table of contents2INTRODUCTION..............................................................................................................................1FORWARD.......................................................................................................................................3ICONICITY-DESIGN ...........................................................................................................................4EXISTING CAMPUS BUILDINGS ............................................................................................................5EXISTING CAMPUS AXIAL FOCUS POINTS.............................................................................................6EXISTING CAMPUS COURTYARDS .......................................................................................................7EXISTING CAMPUS ARCADE/LOGGIA.................................................................................................8EXISTING CAMPUS PLAZAS ................................................................................................................9EXISTING CAMPUS PATHS ................................................................................................................10EXISTING CAMPUS LANDSCAPING ....................................................................................................11EXISTING CAMPUS GATEWAYS.........................................................................................................12PATTERNS, DETAILS, ART AND SCULPTURE .........................................................................................13RESILIENT LOW CARBON COMMUNITY ..............................................................................................14EXISTING CONDITIONS ...............................................................................................................15ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DRIVERS ...................................................................................................18ZONING AND FUTURE LAND USE .......................................................................................................19ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ..................................................................................................20MULTI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION ..............................................................................................25THOROUGHFARE GUIDELINES...........................................................................................................26THOROUGHFARE SECTIONS..............................................................................................................28TRANSIT CONNECTIVITY...................................................................................................................32BUS SERVICE..................................................................................................................................33EXISTING BIKE PATHS.......................................................................................................................34PROPOSED BIKE PATHS AND TRAILS...................................................................................................35MARKET TRENDS...........................................................................................................................36VISIONS OF A NEW ERA ..............................................................................................................40FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS ..................................................................................................................41MULTI-MODAL CONNECTIVITY NETWORK..........................................................................................42THOROUGHFARE ............................................................................................................................43HIGHER EDUCATION CONNECTIVITY .................................................................................................44ROLLINS COLLEGE CAMPUS ............................................................................................................45BUILDING STORY FIGURE GROUND ...................................................................................................46BUILDING MASSING FIGURE GROUND ..............................................................................................47WALKWAYS/PATHS FIGURE GROUND ...............................................................................................48GREENS FIGURE GROUND...............................................................................................................49CELEBRATIONS OF CIVILITY ..............................................................................................................503D MODEL VISTAS .........................................................................................................................51ARCHITECTURAL INSPIRATIONS .........................................................................................................52HIPPOCRATES COURTYARD .............................................................................................................53AXIAL VISTA ..................................................................................................................................54ALONZO ROLLINS PLAZA.................................................................................................................55GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE .................................................................................................................56FLORIDA VERNACULAR LANDSCAPE .................................................................................................57DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ..........................................................................................................58CONCLUSION ..............................................................................................................................64ROLLINS COLLEGE MASTER OF PLANNING IN CIVIC URBANISMMPC 690 CIVIC URBANISM DESIGN STUDIOMAY 4, 2013PROFESSORS:BRUCE STEPHENSON, PHD.ALBERTO VARGASJOHN CUNNINGHAMSTUDENTS:SCOTT R. TESS, LEED GAJEFFREY KARSCHJC AYALA, CNUaUrbanPlanners +DesignersTKA& Co.
  3. 3. forewordIntroduction GoalsGoal 1: Enhance South Lake Nona Through Rollins Tradition of Civic Urbanism• Plan for a variety of space uses including reflection, sociability, public performance, and civilengagement• Create honorable places that reflect the ideals of medicine• Enable social interactions by connecting Rollins campus to the South Lake Nona District• Design an organic connectivity within the campus replete with vistas of surprise and visual ex-cellence• Create a hierarchy of building heights that are subordinate to a central iconic structure.• Plan a system of coherent connected pathways, corridors and sidewalks where the pedestrianis the priority.Goal 2: Cultivate a Healthy and Sustainable Campus• Design a walkable and human scale campus with both intimate and open areas that create apositive and healthful environment.• Arrange for flexible building modalities that can be adapted for future uses• Integrate Florida vernacular style building materials and recycled materials in order to maxi-mize conservation of natural resources• Incorporate LEED-ND standards• Design agricultural spaces that promote utilitarian conservation• Plan for a bike-sharing program• Design native landscapes that foster a textural atmosphere that promotes social interactionGoal 3: Ensure Consistent Development Standards• Empower a non-profit board that oversees and promotes the improvement of the South LakeNona District.• Engage the City of Orlando and Orange County government to continue promoting humanscale infrastructures and multi modal transportation.• Invite colleges to develop student low cost housing within a ½ mile pedestrian shed.• Employ a lead Urban Planner to oversee development in the district.• Engage Lynx and the Florida Department of Transportation to establish connectivity among thesite, Orlando International Airport and the Sunrail facilities. An 8-acre parcel at the South Lake Nona District has been allocated for the purpose ofestablishing a Rollins College extension campus that will offer graduate degrees in allied medical andhealth fields. Our team sees great value in the acquisition and development of this land. The collegewould complement the core medical and research programs already being offered at the existinghospitals and educational facilities.The extension campus site is undeveloped land with basic infrastructure in place, for example,cleared land and water retention ponds. This project is ready for a comprehensive architecture anddesign that reflects the historical and yet contemporary aura of the Rollins’ main campus. This proposalwill offer design solutions with an integrated model to provide for the future demands and growth of theLake Nona medical industrial-residential complex.The South Lake Nona district development already boasts a Veteran’s Administration Hospital,Nemours Children’s Hospital, Sanford Burnham Research Institute, and the University of Central FloridaCollege of Medicine facilities. Studies indicate that a dynamic cluster of mutually cooperative enterprisescan better promote development and high levels of employment for the area.The Rollins campus of Winter Park has a historic identity with established architectural themesof European motifs, mostly of a Mediterranean-Spanish style. Key elements in the overall design arethe pathways, corridors, and open spaces for pedestrian use. Many of the present elements havebeen a part of the Rollins campus for over a century. At present, the existing architecture of the SouthLake Nona sites is of a modernist eclectic interpretation with several large buildings designed for multi-purpose use.The opportunity presented in designing a 10-acre Rollins extension campus is in integratingthe traditional motifs and values of the college’s Winter Park campus with the needs of the growingLake Nona community. We propose a comprehensive integration of the past and present, employingtraditional design principles with the most innovative technologies, yet maintaining the valued elementsof the mother campus.This new location will draw upon a humanistic tradition and New Urbanist values, incorporatingproven technologies, both modern and historic. This proposal will describe the iconicity that enlivensthe Rollins tradition and then propose goals, objectives, and a design solution that extends this traditionof excellence to the South Lake Nona site. .3
  4. 4. iconicity - designiconicity designThe term iconicity refers to meanings attached to forms. It is the ability of buildings andplaces to represent or suggest some idea, value, or sentiment. The buildings and places onthe Rollins College Campus are very effective at communicating ideas. An important waythat the Rollins College campus communicates is through its placement in the landscape. Thecampus occupies a place of honor as a terminating vista for the most important street in town. It also fronts a significant lake offering sublime views that create the sense that this is a placefor contemplation. The placement of the buildings within the campus also has expressive power. Thecourtyard between the Cornell Campus Center and the Mills Memorial hall is open enoughto be inviting, but secluded enough to offer a comfortable setting to rest, linger, and interact. The Green, large and closed on three sides but very open on the fourth is clearly stating itsreadiness to hold large crowds for boisterous civic events. Mary Jean Plaza employs a varietyof elevations and trellises to summon students and faculty for quiet study or private discussion. Finely crafted spaces that effectively communicate their purpose all connected by walkingpaths are part of the iconicity of Rollins College.The architecture of Rollins College also has a communicative iconicity. The quality anddurability of the materials are chosen for buildings that are meant to last for the ages. Thisclearly conveys to the viewer that these buildings have a timeless import. Their purpose willnot wax as fashions do nor date as technologies do. The durability of the construction is mostvisible in the wood beam construction of roofs and entryways. Were there a fire, the largewood pillars and brackets would char for hours without giving way. The simple styling of thewoodwork convey a sense that beauty is important, but should not be a distraction. Thearchitecture serves to create spaces for learning and is a means to an end, not an end initself. The Spanish Mediterranean style chosen for the campus buildings communicates thatthese buildings belong in this place and are connected to the historic La Florida colonized bythe Spanish. The appropriateness of the style for the place is extended by the presence ofcovered walkways between buildings protecting students and faculty from the frequent rainsof the Central Florida climate. A lake, a residential neighborhood, and a historic shopping district delineate theRollins College campus. Axial roads, meandering paths, terminus vistas and adaptablelandscaping, stage, wrap and embellish the buildings in which student lives revolve.Vernacular architectural styles of Spanish Mediterranean, Moorish, Neo-classical, Renaissanceand Gothic motifs, honor Rollins’ liberal arts roots. From The Green at the center of campus, any building is easily accessed within afive-minute walk. At the top of the Green sits the celebrated Mills Memorial Hall and is the ter-minus of the main pedestrian entrance to Rollins. A second floor arcade defined by roundedarches with classical Italian Renaissance columns and covered entryway, invite students intothis building now used as a resource center.4
  5. 5. existing campus buildingsxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxGATE107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120430315500600205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U ELLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbanksabedchgfbush science center (1969)spanish renaissance with classical influencewarren administration building (1947)spanish mediterranean with classical influencecanegie hall (1908-09)neo-classicalolin library (1985)spanish mediterranean with gothic and moorish influencemills memorial hall (1951)spanish mediterranean with italian classical renaissanceinfleuncecornell hall for the social science (1988)spanish mediterranean influencedannie russell theatre (1932)spanish mediterranean with lombard architecture influenceknowles memorial chapel (1931)spanish mediterranean with classical renaissance and gothicinfleuncepinehurst cottage (1886)new england cottage styleiabcdefghiBuilding design and arrangement form a pattern for campus life. Successful campuses have icon-ic buildings located centrally and terminally along main axial thoroughfares. Support or “Soldier”buildings configure the majority of the campus fabric and visually augment and identify the impor-tance of the larger, heroic buildings.abcdeig hf5
  6. 6. existing campus axial focus pointsxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxGATE107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120430315500600205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EOLLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHEC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EESTREETO R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbankssouth interlachen ave and mills memorial axis(historical rollins college entrance)bush science center and harold and ted alfond sport center axialwalkway path.warren administration building and knowles memorial chapel court-yard axis.abcbcaab cbIconic places such as Versailles or Washington DC are archetypal examples that utilize axial thoroughfares to celebrate importantbuildings and places. These vistas are important for ceremonial purposes such as parades. In the past Rollins graduating studentsmarched from Knowles Chapel to Central Park on Park Ave. In this journey the student passed several vistas of important collegelandmarks. Appropriately placed, university buildings offer symbolic, cultural, and physical connections to the surroundingcommunity.6
  7. 7. existing campus courtyardsxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120430315500205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U ELIEAVENUES.INTERLACHC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbankscornell hall for the social sciences courtyardHooker courtyardlyman hall and hooker hall courtyardcornell campus center courtyardwoolson house and orlando hall courtyardcross hall and mayflower hall courtyardabcdefabcdefa bc deCourts and courtyards provide securesurroundings for intimate yet publicgatherings. Buildings forming theperimeter of a courtyard, or the walls,vegetation or railings that may define acourt set the stage for the atmospherewithin. These open spaces typicallyprovide areas for quiet contemplationor communication and intellectualcommerce. f7
  8. 8. existing campus arcade/loggiaxxxxx200422ANTN E W E N G L A N D A V E N U EDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxGATE107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120203430315500600205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EOLLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHENAVENUEC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYO S C E O L A A V E N U EEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbanksarcadeloggiaannie russell theatre arcadeannie russell theatre and knowles memorial chapel loggiascross hall to rollins college rice family bookstore arcade/loggialyman hall to rollins hall arcade/loggiaabcdaba b b c dcd“Around the plaza as well as along the four principal streets whichbegin there shall be arcades, for these are of considerable conve-nience to the merchants who generally gather there.” (Law of theIndies: 115)A loggia, an element of a buildings facade, open on one side, or anarcade, formed by a succession of columns that support arches orlintels, provide cover from the elements and focus movement. Linearplacement of columns and archways offer a sense of interconnec-tivity among the past, present and future.8
  9. 9. existing campus plazasxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120203430315500205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EOLLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHENC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbankscornell hall for the social sciences plazarollins college rice family book store plazamills memorial center/cornell campus center plazacornell campus center plazahooker hall plazaabcdeabcdeab cd e“The main plaza is to be the starting point for the town… it should be at the center of the town. The plaza shouldbe square or rectangular, in which case it should have at least one and a half its width for length inasmuch as thisshape is best for fiestas” (Laws of the Indies: 112)Rollins has a number of plazas, open spaces at important intersections and defined by buildings, offering centersfor social gatherings and events. Open and inviting, plazas provide meeting places for serendipitous pauses andbrief contact.9
  10. 10. existing campus pathsxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxGATE107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120203430315500600205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EOLLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHEC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbanksnew brick path with canopyrollins college historical walk of fameconcrete path covered by mature canopypicturest naturalistic pathabcdabcdbdabbc d dPaths connect buildings, squares and greens providing ease of access and creating interior movement away from transpor-tation. Naturalistic paths covered with shady tree canopies provide interesting connections between places. These form auseful network for pedestrians. Some paths wind along water features, inviting the viewer to contemplation. Other pathscontain artistic elements along the way celebrating famous people and events.10
  11. 11. existing campus landscapingxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120430315500205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EEAVENUES.INTERLAC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EBLAKESTREETV I T O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbanksabcdeabc d emills lawn greenmary jean greenmature canopy hedges difining pathways native landscapeElements that compose the landscape atRollins are often subtle. Shifting elevationscreate vista, plantings offer color and bufferpedestrians from traffic. Large trees impartmajesty to honorific sites and often becomememorable on their own. At Rollins, thelandscape is sometimes formal andgeometric or casual and natural.11
  12. 12. existing campus gatewaysxxxxx422ANTDROPINLETxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx x xxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxGATE107105101100110118170167171169300335331325329319330334312309311317307303305304302404402424425423406420407419414418417 415412411409400120430315500600205 201204238234 236206207208209210224228214211215219222223225229231 235F A I R B A N K S A V E N U EOLLIEAVENUES.INTERLACHEC O M S T O C K A V E N U EE . L Y M A N A V E N U EONETTEFRENCHAVE.L A K E V I R G I N I ATIEDEKEWAYEUNEVAKRAPF A I R B A N K S A V E N U ECHASEAVENUEH O L T A V E N U EAKESTREETT O R I A A V E N U ELAKEVIEWW. Fairbanksnew brick path with canopyrollins college historical walk of fameconcrete path covered by mature canopypicturesque naturalistic pathabcdadbc eRollins College has one main gateway to the campus and several interior gateways that introduce specific areas. Whether large andimposing, or simple and unadorned, these gateways impress, welcome and enhance traveling throughout the campus. These gate-ways also function to make the campus securable in an uncertain future. A key sustainability principle in Steve Mouzon’s OriginalGreen.ab cde12
  13. 13. doors and doorwaysdoors and doorwaysgable endsdoors and doorwayscastingsironworkdoors and doorwaysdoors and doorwaystowers columns and pilasterlight fixturespunched windows and trimscallopsventssculpturefinialarriere-voussure - archscrollsculptureshistorytimelessdetailhardscape“They shall try so far as possible to have the buildings all of one type for the sake of the beauty of the town.” (Lawof the Indies: 134)The various patterns and motifs at Rollins are primarily classical in feature but vary in their modernity and culturederivation. Placement of sculpture along with the repeating patterns of shape and texture serve to promote amore classical and formal sense of place throughout the campus.13existing campus details
  14. 14. resilient low carbon communityThere is a need for more sustainable, or low carbondevelopment. In Sustainable and Resilient Communities,Stephen Coyle describes a high carbon community as onewhere land uses are separated by zoning with an atten-dant decline in bike, pedestrian, and mass transit modes. The condition is advanced by cheap oil, highway buildingpolicies, and conversion of farm and natural lands to singleuse suburbs. The text goes on to explain that low carboncommunities cultivated “local commerce, managed avail-able resources, exploited rail and water access, adapted topopulation growth” successfully across the North Americanlandscape (Coyle, 2011, p. 4). These two opposed devel-opment patterns impact the rubric of “supporting systems”that make communities possible:· Transportation· Energy· Water· Natural Environment· Food Production/Agriculture· Solid Waste· EconomicLow carbon communities provide all of these supportingsystems with minimal negative impact on the environment,especially in terms of carbon emissions. Transportationmodes facilitate bike, pedestrian, and mass transit. Ener-gy is produced from nearby renewable resources. Wateris conserved and reused. The natural environment is pre-served in key locations. Food Production is local and largelyorganic. Solid Waste is minimized through source reductionand recycling. Economic vitality is supported in a localized,recirculating manner. In The Original Green, Steve Mouzon proposes adesign ethos that can be used to characterize the sustain-able attributes of any building or place, regardless of itspurpose or the system it supports. By “The Original Green,”Mouzon intends to identify those materials and practicesthat have been utilized for centuries to create an efficient,environmentally friendly built environment. Mouzon seeks torestore living traditions of building and reinterprets them foran energy depleted, global warming challenged world. Hiseight principles of The Original Green are as follows: Sustainable Places are· Nourishable· Accessible· Servicable· SecurableSustainable Buildings are· Lovable· Durable· Flexible· FrugalSustainable places must provide some of their own food,convey people and goods with a diversity of transportationmodes, offer a multitude of daily necessities and amusementsin bikable or walkable distances, and feature a street andbuilding form “that can be physically adjusted in the futureso that there is not undue fear for your own safety” (Mouzon,2010). Sustainable Buildings must be lovable enough to war-rant preservation, durable so as to resist weather and wear,flexible for adaptive reuse, and frugal with materials, energy,and water. In LEED For Neighborhood Development, the US GreenBuilding Council has created a menu of 100 sustainabledevelopment practices with specific performance metrics. Achieving the performance metrics earns a developmentpoints towards a certification. LEED ND points can be earned for high performance in thefollowing categories:· Smart Location and Linkage· Neighborhood Pattern and Design· Green Infrastructure and BuildingsSmart Location and Linkage encourages infill where masstransit is possible avoiding environmentally sensitive lands. Neighborhood Pattern and Design awards points for walk-able, mixed-use streets with frequent intersections and abun-dant street trees. Green Infrastructure and Buildings urgesonsite low impact stormwater management, historic preser-vation, onsite renewable energy, and LEED Certified buildings(USGBC, http://www.usgbc.org). These three rubrics approach the task of developingsustainable communities in different ways. Sustainable andResilient Communities aims to create low carbon communitiesby addressing seven supporting systems with green practices. The Original Green offers eight principles that characterizesustainable places and buildings. LEED For NeighborhoodDevelopment establishes specific performance metrics for avariety of development practices with a points system to cer-tify a sustainable community. Much of the content in thesesystems are similar or complimentary, differing in emphasis orarrangement. It is most advantageous to be conscious of allof these sustainability rubrics when planning a new develop-ment.source: environmental health perpectives, vol. 115source: asla.org14
  15. 15. Greenfield developments like MedicalCity often lack historical buildingcharacter as well as monumentscommemorating important people. Inshort they often lack iconicity.While Medical City may feature showyand unique modernist buildings, whenseveral of these buildings are in closeproximity, they tend to compete forattention and clash aesthetically. TheRollins tradition of excellence in designof educational environments representsan iconicity that offers an ensemble ofbuildings and spaces that enhance eachother rather than compete and detractfrom one another.This ensemble creates an iconicity ofplace rather than simply a memorablebuilding. It is this sort of iconicity that willbe requisite to achieve the developmentgoals of enhancing Medical City with theRollins tradition of excellence in design,creating a continuously safe and activecollege campus, and innovating a globalexemplar of a healthy and sustainablecampus.15
  16. 16. existing conditionssouth lake nona district16
  17. 17. ucf health sciences campus sanford-burnhamva medical center nemoursuf research & academic center laureate parkucf health sciences campusIn March 2006, UCF received approval to construct a College of Medicine atLake Nona. The medical college’s has now entered its third year and nearly200 med students are now enrolled at the college.  The college’s Medical Ed-ucation Building opened in the Fall of 2010. The Burnett Biomedical SciencesBuilding opened in early 2010nemoursNemours, one of the nation’s largest pediatric health systems, recently an-nounced its decision to build a pediatric health care campus, anchored bya state-of-the-art children’s hospital and outpatient clinic in Lake Nona. Thehospital opened in October of 2012sanford-burnhamAfter months of review and intense media attention, in August 2006, the sec-ond major piece of Lake Nona Medical City fell into place. Sanford-BurnhamMedical Research Institute (formerly Burnham Institute), one of the leadingscientific research institutions in the nation, selected Lake Nona as its site for anew east coast research facility, providing the San Diego-based, non-profit or-ganization with bicoastal operations. Scientists moved into their cutting-edgeLake Nona facility in May of 2009uf research & academic centerThe University of Florida, the oldest and largest public university in the state hasannounced plans to locate a research facility at Lake Nona Medical City. The100,000 square-foot facility will be located next to the Sanford-Burnham Medi-cal Research Institute at Lake Nona and will enable the university to have directcollaboration opportunities with Sanford-Burnham Institute’s top scientists. Thefacility opened in the summer of 2012va medical centerWith more than 1.8 million veterans calling Florida home, the Department ofVeterans Affairs (VA) recognized the need to build a new facility capable ofproviding the highest quality of healthcare and services to local veterans andtheir families in Central Florida. The new, over $665 million, state-of-the-art facili-ty will increase accessibility to health care for approximately 400,000 of CentralFlorida’s veteransmd andersonThrough a strategic partnership with the University of Central Florida, theclinical research department, known as MD Anderson Orlando Cancer Re-search Institute (CRI) occupies 30,000 square-feet of space on the fifth floorof the new UCF Burnett Biomedical Sciences Buildinglaureate parkNow open and featuring homes with modern transitional architectur-al styles and an abundance of intelligent forward-thinking components,this altogether wired-in, future-evoking community has some of Orlando’smost intelligent minds as its neighbors. Located near Lake Nona’s MedicalCity, Laureate Park will give its residents the opportunity to realize that notall neighborly chit-chat has to revolve around the weather. Sometimes anin-depth conversation about particle accelerators and gene-splicing is allyou need to feel truly connected to your neighbors.source: http://learnlakenona.com/medical-cityexisting conditions 17
  18. 18. economics and social driversIn a nutshellLocated at the southeastern borderline between Orange and Osceola countieslies South Lake Nona aka “Medical City”. Its roadway accessibility connectingMedical City to other destinations such as Orlando International Airport, Down-town Orlando and Disney World makes Medical City an advantageous location.Because of its connectivity and health related research institutions, colleges,and hospital, South Lake Nona is poised to become an economic force andentrepreneurial cluster delivering high-paying jobs to Central Floridians.Historical PrecedentsMedical City is a product of Governor Jeb Bush’s vision to diversify the Floridaeconomy. Governor Bush announced programs that incentive biomedicalresearch companies moving to Florida. Because of these government incen-tives the Scripps Research Institute, based in La Jolla, San Diego, accepted $579million in grants to open a location in Florida. However, a partnership betweengovernment, private and non-profit organizations could not lure Scripps to moveto Lake Nona. The partnership agreed that in order to attract a biomedical re-search institute into Central Florida, a medical school needed to be created.Entrepreneurship and vision created The University of Central Florida Health Sci-ences Campus. This public-private agreement stimulated other medical relatedcompanies to move to South Lake Nona creating what many-titled, MedicalCity.With the vision of Governor Bush as well as private and non-profit leadership,South Lake Nona will have approximately four thousand high paying jobs. Sec-ondary jobs not-related directly to the health industry will also contribute to aneconomically successful Central Florida.Chronological history of a placeOctober 2005 University of Central Florida, College of MedicineAugust 2006 Sanford – Burnham Medical Research InstituteMarch 2007 Department of Veteran AffairsDecember 2007 MD Anderson cancer Center OrlandoJanuary 2008 NemoursDecember 2009 University of Florida, Research InstituteSoon Rollins College Re-thinking entrepreneurship and its challengesThe Tavistock group, unsatisfied with what had been accomplished, contract-ed Sasaki to create a human scale vision of place to South Lake Nona. Sasaki’scomprehensive guidelines addressed and created order to South Lake Nonaby introducing traditional urban planning guidelines. These guidelines establishorder, character and overall social capital among those soon to work and live inthis district. proximity mapmajor destinations18
  19. 19. zoning and future land useCity of Orlando South Lake Nona ZoningThis zoning map establishes that South Lake Nona is zoned as a PD. South and Northeast of the de-velopment is zoned as conservation and water features. Northwest of the development is zoned asHolding/No city zoning with aircraft noise.City of Orlando South Lake Nona’s Future land useThis future land use map establishes that South Lake Nona is zoned as an Urban Village. The Southand Northeast areas of the development are zoned as conservation districts. Northwest of the de-velopment is zoned as Airport Support District Intensity and resource protection overlay.RollinsRollins19
  20. 20. south lake nona districtenvironmental assessment20
  21. 21. environmental assessmentland use 1954 land use 1980 land use 1984land use 2013aerial photographs source: natural resources conservation serviceAn understanding of the soil quality of this project area is important for builders and landscape designers. Knowing soils quality andsurface proximity to the water table helps determine building placement, plant choice and irrigation systems needed. Factors af-fecting soil formation are climate, physical composition of parent material, living organisms on or in the soil, land contours, and thelength of time these factors and conditions give the soil its unique characteristics.Consistent Subtropical temperature ranges mean that soils never freeze and at an average depth of 20 inches, soils average 72degrees Fahrenheit. Biological activity and chemical reactions are involved in soil formation throughout the year. An averageannual rainfall of 51 inches causes nutrients to leech downward forming a sub soil. The rapid decomposition of organic matter andthe downward flow of nutrients in primarily sandy soils promote acidic conditions and low nutrient retention. The soils of Orange County are formed largely of marine based deposits such as quartz sands, clay and shell fragments. Percent-ages of organic material vary and are determined by wetland decomposition. The Lake Nona area soils are formed largely of finequartz sands with a low to moderate ability to drain surface water resulting in pine and palmetto communities called flatwoods.In flatwoods areas, the water table is found at an average of five feet from the surface. As a result organic matter moving from thesurface forms a layer of humus a short distance under the surface. In low areas where the water table meets the surface, depositsof plant material accumulate and only partially decay forming muck sometimes leaving a dark layer of topsoil.The project area has been undeveloped wetland for most of its history as seen in the chronological areal photographs. RecentHuman interaction with the surface layer such as road and building construction, clear-cutting trees and removal of understoryvegetation, have resulted in poor soils of varying qualities. These variations often motivate developers to use soil amendmentsrequiring fertilizers and excessive irrigation in order to maintain those mostly non-native plant communities common to modernlandscaping.21
  22. 22. environmental assessmentDesign techniques, fostered by the environmental “green”movement, have inspired landscape architects to employnative plantings which, when established, require less irrigationand fertilization. Rollins College will consider the above factorsin landscape planning for the proposed Medical City campus. Proper plant placement and management will not only helppreserve soils and aquatic systems, but will inspire designers tocreate outdoor “rooms” proving for healthful and attractiveoutdoor and activity in well designed landscapes.Examples of practical landscape styles using native species andsensible planning are already evident in the landscapes of theWinter Park Rollins campus and the new UCF Medical School.Florida has developed strong problems with the overuse of waterfrom the Floridan aquifer. Using reclaimed water has becomean important factor with new development. In their planningMedical city has employed systems for the collection and use ofreclaimed water, which is processed and distributed from Orlan-do’s Iron Bridge treatment plant. This has reduced the demandfor water pumped directly from the aquifer.22
  23. 23. Typical to subtropical climate conditions rainfall is heaviest for a four-month period in late springand throughout the summer. Other months have periodic rainfall that is inadequate for irrigation.Native plantings, once established, can adjust to these dry and wet periods. Another importantfactor is temperature. Ranging from highs in the upper 90s during the summer and early fall monthsand can drop low enough to form frost during winter months.The amount of sunlight available is important to planning. Times of intense radiationcause heat effect that stress cooling systems. Proper building orientation can mitigateheat transfer from sunlight. Roof orientation enhances optimum photovoltaic panelplacement. Florida receives an average of 5.0 to 5.5 hours of peak sunlight more in sum-mer and less in winter.http://www.nrel.gov/gis/solar.htmlenvironmental assessment 23
  24. 24. environmental assessmentProper placement and use of native plant species not only aidsin water conservation but may also be used in the treatment ofstormwater runoff. Stormwater from the UCF Medical Schoolbuilding runs into drainage pits that are surrounded by nativespecies of cypress trees and grasses and functions as a naturalfiltration system. Similar systems may be employed to filterstormwater from streets before reaching lakes. Appropriatelylandscaped riparian zones around lake edges are vital to lakehealth.A list of Native Plant Species may be found at the following sitehttp://fyn.ifas.ufl.edu/homeowners/publications.htm24
  25. 25. multi-modal transportationsouth lake nona districtRollins25
  26. 26. thoroughfare guidelinesTraditional GridFollowing the City of Orlandohistorical roadway network, Sasakiintroduces Roman principles ofcity development with small blocksinterconnected with a traditional gridroadway network. In these principlesa hierarchy of thoroughfares permitsconnectivity and mobility in atimely manner without creating anunwelcome environment for thepedestrian.South Lake Nona roadway networksare classified, as “A” roads wherebuilding facades are going to belocated and “B” roads where park-ing or service uses are located. Majorthoroughfares, such as Lake NonaBoulevard, Road C, and Road Q, bor-der what will be the South Lake Nonaurban core, while Tavistock Boulevardwill become the main street’s entry-way.Rollins26
  27. 27. thoroughfare guidelinesEach thoroughfare enhancesthe beauty of the landscapeas well as the pedestrianenvironment. Creating theappearance of an engagingroom-like enclosure increasesthe versatility of sidewalks.enclosure increases theversatility of sidewalks.enclosure increases theversatility of sidewalks.Rollins27
  28. 28. thoroughfare sections28
  29. 29. thoroughfare sections 29
  30. 30. thoroughfare sections30
  31. 31. thoroughfare sectionsbacdefgabcde fRollins31
  32. 32. transit conectivity TransitConnectivity within South Lake Nona to other destinations in the Central Florida region requires different modesof transportation. Additionally, Gen Y’s more substantial preference for public transportation requires a public-private partnership to invest in multi-modal transportation and potential circulator routes in order to competewith other regions in the United States. Sasaki’s Future Plan established a right of way acquisition plan thatguarantees future transit development in South Lake Nona connecting to the Orlando International Airport andwithin South Lake Nona. They proposed a regional fixed guideway transit and a potential circulator routes allwith stops every half-mile or less. While the backbone for transit has been established in Sasaki’s guidelines, it isimperative for a public-private entity to develop and connect South Lake Nona to other destinations in order tomake this development more attractive to future generations and the elderly.rollinssite32
  33. 33. bus serviceroute 42route 51 route 11route 111south lake nona districtroute 18Bus ServiceThere are five bus routes thatconnect the airport to different areas.Unfortunately, Sasaki’s guidelines do notaddress bus connectivity to South LakeNona because their preferred modeof public transportation is transit andcirculator. While transit and circulatortransportation modes are ideal, acquiringmonies dedicated to this type oftransportation becomes a challenge.33
  34. 34. existing bike pathsBike trails and pathsThe ability to travel within South Lake Nona depends onmulti-modal transportation. Density near transit or bus stops,while development continues; bike lanes and paths aremulti-modal solutions.The City of Orlando has started an aggressive program forbike paths and trails. Many of these trails are already in use,recognizing a bike trail deficiency within Lake Nona andthroughout the region. Understanding bike trail disconnect,The City of Orlando has implemented a plan to repair andconnect bike lanes and trails. People living, working andattending college are going to be able to commute to theirdestination without automobile use.34
  35. 35. proposed bike paths and trailsProposed bike lanes and paths enhance a sense of place,creating an environment conducive to public health, safetyand welfare for the citizens.35
  36. 36. market trendssouth lake nona district36
  37. 37. Incomes and home prices in Medical City and Lake Nona arehigh. This will drive many students and faculty out of Lake Nona if therearen’t lower cost residential options. The Rollins campus could success-fully offer more affordable housing, but it will need to offer amenity aswell as a short or no commute to out compete more distant locationswhere students and faculty may choose to live. A new Rollins Campus in Medical City can gain an advan-tage by providing student and faculty housing with no commute. Existing commute times for Lake Nona residents are often up-wards of 35 minutes. 78% of residents drive an auto alone to workwhile less than 1% walk to work.market trends 37
  38. 38. Key Demographic FactorsLake Nona 32832Population: 13,787 Census 2010Median Age: 33.2 Census 2010Median Income $76,250 Census 2011Source: Census American Fact FinderThe primary residents of the future Rollins campus in Medical City are primarilystudents. Therefore traditional market analysis will not inform uptake in residentialproperties. Most future residents will be students and some faculty. Some ofwhich may be required to have some term of tenancy though most will not. Thedemographics of the student population will be dependent on a number offactors including the type of programs offered by Rollins College. For studentswith housing choice, Rollins campus will have to compete with other residentiallocations on quality and commute. College aged students from approximately 20 to 29 years of age are currently11.7% of the population in Lake Nona. Creating a continuously safe and activecampus can provide a distinct advantage to attracting college aged studentsand younger faculty to reside on campus. market trends38
  39. 39. Real Estate AnalysisMarket-acceptance potential of the proposed siteA future Rollins campus in South Lake Nona has several advantages in market acceptance. Incomes are higher in Lake Nona indicating to potential residents that the neighborhood isprosperous. The location is accessible from an international airport and a major highway. There are newly constructed schools nearby and a town center style development with retailis planned for the South Lake Nona area.§ Higher home and rental prices in South Lake Nona will drive many students and facultyout of Lake Nona if there aren’t lower cost residential options. The Rollins campus couldsuccessfully offer more affordable housing, but it will need to offer amenity as well as a shortor no commute to out compete more distant locations where students and faculty maychoose to live.§ A new Rollins Campus in Medical City can gain an advantage by providing student andfaculty housing with no commute. Existing commute times for Lake Nona residents are oftenupwards of 35 minutes. 78% of residents drive an auto alone to work while less than 1% walkto work.§ The Advisory Board Company notes that 1 in 6 new jobs in the US in 2012 were in the healthcare field. Furthermore, through the recession health car job creation has been far moreresilient than the rest of the economy.Direct competitorsThe competition for buyers and renters in a future Rollins campus is traditional neighborhooddevelopments (TND) within the region. A future Rollins campus will offer a different productthan nearby conventional suburban development and will be addressing a different marketdemand. If the Rollins campus can offer a TND of equal or greater quality than other TND’swithin the region, the ability for people working on campus to also live there and avoid acommute can be most advantageous.Approved or proposed future competitor projects.There are no future medical campuses planned in Florida that would compete with a newRollins campus. The forthcoming Alabama College of Osteopathic Medicine and WilliamCarey University College of Osteopathic Medicine in North Carolina are the only plannedmedical schools in the Southeast that have some connectivity with other neighborhood uses. The former is adjacent to a T4 General Urban neighborhood, while the latter is adjacent toa T3 Sub-urban neighborhood. A future Rollins campus can outcompete these competitorsby offering a greater degree of connectivity to nearby uses as well as a greater variety ofnearby uses. The two schools mentioned only have significant connectivity to single familyresidences.Economic and demographic factors influencing new home demand§ Lake Nona 32832Population: 13,787 Census 2010Median Age: 33.2 Census 2010Median Income $76,250 Census 2011§ Source: Census American Fact Finder§ College aged students from approximately 20 to 29 years of age are currently 11.7% ofthe population in Lake Nona. Creating a continuously safe and active campus can providea distinct advantage to attracting college aged students and younger faculty to reside oncampus.§ Source: Census American Fact FinderDemographic factors and generational market preferences are growing the market forwalkable mixed-use suburbia. This is precisely the type of development emerging in SouthLake Nona.According to RCLCO’s Market For New Urbanism and Smart Growth, when choosing to pur-chase a home, 79% of survey respondents say commute time is a top priority, 75% want side-walks and places to walk, 50% will choose a smaller lot in exchange for a shorter commute,and 30% will choose a smaller lot to be close to stores.End-user buyer/renter profilesGen Y student renters – all typesGen X adult student buyers – SFR, TownhomesGen X adult faculty buyers – SFR, TownhomesBaby Boomer faculty buyers – all typesBased on generational preferences in to RCLCO’s Market For New Urbanism and SmartGrowthAppropriate housing products (lot sizes, home sizes, features, amenities), initial base pricingand lot/unit premiums, site common-use or exclusive amenities (if appropriate) market trends 39
  40. 40. visions of a new erasouth lake nona district40
  41. 41. future developmentLake Nona exiting and future development orange county innovation way proposalOrlando Internation Aiport South Terminal proposalsourse: http://www.orlandoairports.net/small_business/docs/Presentation_20121025.pdfThe southern limits of the City of Orlando are in the process of becoming an employment center, housingdevelopment, and center of higher education institutions. These investments are part of a vision that startedfrom public-private partnerships. In Tavistok’s South Lake Nona district, the health industry is a major part of thiseconomic development. Additionally, the Orlando International Airport South Terminal proposal with the planto connect multi-modally to South Lake Nona District is part of an agenda of connectivity for the region to theworld.Stakeholders within the Orange County boundaries coupled with the Innovation Way Connectivity Proposal tothe northeast of Orange County provides a synergy of development for economic opportunity. For the nextthirty years, this whole area is projected to become one of the major developments of central Florida.41
  42. 42. OUC Commuter Rail Conectivity proposalBus/BRT Conectivity proposalLatest market trends indicate that most people prefer to live in walkable and connected places.Greg Logan, Manager director of Robert Charles Lesser & Co., says in a March 2013 Planning maga-zine “…that [people] want to live in…mixed use, walkable environments…[it is] the top choice for allgenerations, from Gen Y to Senior to live in.”While many proposals for multi-modal transportation have been planned for the region, existingLake Nona including proposed housing, businesses and institutions, continue to be car-centric sub-urbs disconnected from most of the important urban centers.Existing low-density development makes it difficult to establish differing modes of transportation. Insti-tuting varying types of transportation is a challenging task for South Lake Nona District. Understand-ing this premise, TKA & Co. is proposing an incremental transportation connectivity network solutionfor the district.The following are recommendations for the creation of multi-modal transportation in the next thirtyyears that will service proposed development in the area.Bike Lanes (0 to 5 years)• Adopt City of Orlando bike connectivity.• Create Bike Tracks or bike paths on major thoroughfares such as Road Q, C and Lake Nona Boule-vard.• All minor thoroughfares should be signed as bike share roads.• Create bike corrals, parking and facilities where bikes can be stored within the developmentBus/BRT connectivity (5 to 15 years)• Develop a loop route connecting Orlando International Airport to South Lake Nona District.• During peak time or within hospital work shifts, bus/BRT should run every thirty minutes. During offpeak times, Bus/BRT should run every hour.• Add express bus/BRT to facilitate general time constrains.OUC commuter rail connectivity (15 to 25 years)• Establish a partnership between OUC, City of Orlando, and Orange County, Florida Department ofTransportation, and private entities to develop heavy and commuter rails.• Establish rail stations within existing OUC train tracks. Stations should benefit East Orange County,Innovations Way development, South Lake Nona, Orlando International Airport, and end at the Sun-Rail Commuter Rail Phase II proposed facility.Light rail Connectivity (25 to 40 years)• Adopt Sasaki’s rail and bus routes transportation guidelines for South Lake Nona District. See Pagethirty-two for details.1 Jeffrey Spivak, “ House Hunting. Are demographics destiny? Developers and others are bettingyes,” Planning, March 201342 multi-modal connectivity network
  43. 43. T5 T4 T3M SD G WRollinsproposed transectThe City of Orlando future land useplan establishes that South Lake Nonais zoned as an urban village. Howeverin order to promote predictable andcoherent urban development, TKA &Co. recommends South Lake Nonaadopt a locally calibrated transectcombined with Sasaki’s Form-BasedCodes.Proposed transect definitions:• T5 - Urban Center Zone consists ofhigher density mixed use buildings thataccommodate retail space, offices,rowhouses and apartments. T5 has atight network of streets, with wide side-walks, steady street tree planting withbuildings set close to the sidewalks.• T4 - General Urban Zone consists ofa mixed use but primarily residentialurban fabric. It may have a wide rangeof building types: single, sideyard, androwhouse. Setbacks and landscapingare variable. Streets with curbs andsidewalks define medium--sized blocks.• T3M – Modified Sub-Urban Zone con-sists of low-density residential areas ad-jacent to higher density zones of mod-erate mixed use. Home occupationsand outbuildings are allowed. Blocksmay be large and the roads irregular toaccommodate natural conditions.• SD - Special districts consist of areaswith buildings that by their function,disposition, or configuration cannot, orshould not, conform to one or more ofthe six normative transect zones.• W - Water features• G - Greens, parks, pocket parks.Source: Center for Applied TransectStudies, Smart Code V. 9.2, PG. xi43
  44. 44. Rollinshigher education connectivityRollins Campus is locatedsoutheast of Lake NonaSouth District. It serves as aterminating vista from theUniversity of Central Florida.The two higher educationcampuses balance eachother, creating an intellectualsynergy in an attractivewalkable environment.44
  45. 45. rollins college campusnortheastquadrantnorthwestquadrantsoutheastquadrantsouthwestquadrantOur visions for a new era in South Lake Nona draw upon the Rollins traditions of excellence in design. Vernacular buildings with an urban form create comfortable outdoor rooms combined with contemporarydesigns of healthful and sustainable places. This vision sees vibrant civic interaction among students andfaculty within a variety of spaces; some offering views of Roger’s Pond, while others provide enjoyableshade from the afternoon sun, and others offer shelter from summer rains. The new era combines nativeand drought tolerant landscaping with cutting edge technology combined with traditional sustainabledesigns making this new campus a low-carbon, healthful place.An active street where social capital connects45
  46. 46. 1 Story2 Story3 Story5 Story6 StoryLegend:building story figure groundCity of Orlando neighborhoods should have a building hierarchy that createsvariety and orders the relative importance of buildings.4 Story46
  47. 47. building massing figure groundAppropriatebuildingmassingframesthestreetandsidewalkstocreatecomfortableoutdoor rooms without bulky, imposing, or monotonous. Uses are mixed verticallyand horizontally with short façade lengths that create variety and interest for amore livable urban experience.47
  48. 48. walkways/paths figure groundOur model for a new Rollins College campus prioritizes pedestrian safety thateliminates auto-centric street patterns. The campus is connected regionally byBRT.48
  49. 49. greens figure groundDrought tolerant Florida friendly species are employed within the many greenspaces. All green spaces, some with edibles production, are irrigated fromstormwater captured onsite. Rainwater is reused and infiltrated back to the aquifer.49
  50. 50. reflectionpoolhippocratesplazaluxamphitheater/green courtyardmulti-purposedrecreation center/parking garageboerhaavegardenalonzo rollinsplazarogers’ lakeholt towerRoad “Q”celebrations of civilitygreentempleGenerous public spaces set the stage for avariety of civic events ranging from casualconversation to performances and speeches.Hippocrates Quadrant Lux QuadrantBoerhaave Quadrantplazapathpathpathgreenpathtoweramphitheaterpathroad/plazabike trailpath50crumplerparkwaykaplanway rodriguez-trias via
  51. 51. 513D model vistasAlonzo Rollins PlazaAerial Vista Alfonzo Rollins PlazaAerial VistaAerial Vista from UCF Vista from Roger’s LakeNorthern quadrants aerial vista
  52. 52. The architecture of the Winter Park Rollins College campus serves to create spaces for learning and is a means to an end,not an end in itself. The Spanish Mediterranean style of the campus communicates that these buildings belong historicallyand are connected to the La Florida colonized by the Spanish. The appropriateness of the style for the place is enhancedby the presence of covered walkways between buildings protecting students and faculty from the frequent rains of theCentral Florida climate. The Winter Park Rollins campus has inspired our architectural choices for the South Lake Nonacampus, but a new era for Rollins should also reflect new considerations. The context of South Lake Nona is a modern,more high tech concept. To create appropriate styles for South Lake Nona, we elected a contemporary Mediterraneanstyle that respects the Spanish tradition, provides for the pedestrians in the Central Florida climate, and used a simplemodern aesthetic appropriate for the future South Lake Nona.52 architectural inspirations
  53. 53. hippocrates courtyard 53
  54. 54. 54 axial vista
  55. 55. alonzo rollins plaza 55
  56. 56. 56Typical road sections in the South Lake Nona District will incorporate storm water filtration with treeplanters and green roofs. Swales and planting boxes that slowly allow water to return to the aquifer aresimple yet effective approaches to mitigating pollutants caused by runoff.A series of gutters capture rain from the parking garage roof routing water to underground cisterns.Captured and stored, rainwater can be used for irrigation, fountain recharge, and toilet flushing. Theproposed parking garage roof may have a large array of photovoltaic panels to supplement energyconsumption.green Infrastructurenative/recyclebuildings materials (typ.)greenroofgreenroofgreenroofgreensolar panels/on site watercollectionlandscapetree well (typ.)stone/masonrypaving block (typ.)florida nativelandscape (typ.)florida naturalisticretention pondparkway withbike laneperviousasphalt (typ.)riparianzone
  57. 57. Native Landscape Planting Palette for the South Lake Nona DistrictFor each transect level, plantings should be consistent with smartcode standards. Native trees, shrubs and grassesshould be used where location permits with the use of turf grass minimized. Several species are encouraged to offerfood for both wildlife and people. . Ornamental “Florida friendly”, non-invasive plantings may be used when neededfor seasonal color and streetscape enhancement.The following is a sampling of suggested plants. The reader is encouraged to review the helpful guides published by theUniversity of Florida, IFAS Extension, used for this section, many of which are offered for free online at: www.edis.ifas.ufl.eduTrees- large Landscape Use / Placement Mature Height AverageLive oak Quercus virginiana Specimen/ Framing and open space 70 feetLaurel oak Quercus laurifolia Specimen/Roadside / parking 75 feetLongleaf pine Pinus palustris Specimen /Open space / median 120 feetSlash pine Pinus elliotti Specimen/ Street/ open space /median 100 feetLoblolly bay Gordonia lasianthus Specimen/ Lakeside 70 feetBald Cypress Taxodium distichum Shade/specimen/ Lakeside 150 feetSouthern Magnolia Magnolia grandiflora Shade/windbreak/ Framing and open space 100 feetRed Maple Acer rubrum Shade/ specimen/ Street 80 feetRedbud Cercis Canadensis Specimen/ Street 30 feetMyrtle Dahoon Holly Ilex cassine myrtifolia Specimen/ Moist areas/lake 25 feetSouthern Wax Myrtle Myrica cerifera Specimen/ hedge/ Street/ parking lot 20 feetAmerican hornbeam Carpinus caroliniana Screen/shade/ Side walk 30 feetFlatwoods Plum Prunus umbellata Specimen/shade/ street 20 feetFlorida boxwood Schaefferia frutescens Hedge/ buffer strip/ median 15 feetCoontie Zamia Pumila Mass planting/ Borders 3 x 5Saw palmetto Serenoa repens Mass planting/ specimen 7 x 8Fetterbush Lyonia lucida Hedge /screen 3 x 5Beauty Berry Callicarpa americana Mass planting / screen/ specimen 4 x 7Firebush Hamelia patens Specimen/accent/ Borders and screens 8 x 7Florida Anise Illicium floridanum Hedge/ screen/ border 12 x 8Coral Honeysuckle Lonicera sempervirens Fence cover, lamposts/ ground cover Thick coverageMaypop Passiflora incarnata Fence cover/ arbor Thick coverageMuhly Grass Muhlenbergia capillaris Accent/ border/ paths and parking 3-4 feetElliott’s Love Grass Eragrostis elliotti Accent/ border/ paths and parking 2-3 feetSand Cord Grass Spartina bakeri Accent/ border/ lakeside 3 x 5Fakahatcheegrass Tripsacum dactyloides Mass planting/ screen 4-6 feetTrees- medium/smallShrubsVinesGrasses57florida vernacular landscape
  58. 58. development programrollins college58
  59. 59. Phase IIThe phasing is planned to achieve parking in a ‘just in time’ fashion tominimize early outlays of capital during the development. As such, theroads, utilities, and on-street parking shall be constructed first.The second phase will include the Northeast quadrant serviced by a temporary surface parking lot on the Northwest quadrantadding 282 parking spaces to the 155 on street parking spaces. This means that upon completion of the vertical constructionof the Northeast quadrant, the facilities can be occupied with all the required parking available. Furthermore, the secondphase will boast some of the best views of Rogers’ Pond within the development. The Northeast quadrant will contain 3,466sq. ft. of retail, 84,910 sq. ft. of administration/classroom, and 84,910 sq. ft. of residential including 85 household units. Thedevelopment cost for the second phase total $32,542,155.Phase I59development programNortheast QuadrantUse Mix Type Sq Ft Households Development Cost Comments2% Retail 3,466 10 519,856.50$49% Admin/Class 84,910 255 12,736,484.25$49% Residential 84,910 85 127 7,641,890.55$100% Totals 173,286 392-17 Shared375 Total 3,754,916.58$24,653,147.88$2,958,377.75$ Consultant Fees4,930,629.58$ Project Contingencies32,542,155.20$ Sum TotalParking Spaces
  60. 60. Phase IIIThe third phase will construct the Southeast quadrant serviced bytemporary surface parking on the Southwest quadrant providingan additional 176 parking spaces and completing the lakefrontvertical construction. The Southeast quadrant will contain 1,758 sq.ft. of retail, 43,063 sq. ft. of administration/classroom, and 43,063sq. ft. of residential including 49 household units. The developmentcosts for the third phase total $16,499,091.60 development programSoutheast QuadrantUse Mix Types Sq Ft Households Development Cost Comments2% Retail 1,758 5 263,650.50$49% Admin/Class 43,063 129 6,459,437.25$49% Residential 43,063 43 65 3,875,662.35$100% Totals 87,884 199-9 Shared190 Total 1,900,561.28$12,499,311.38$1,499,917.37$ Consultant Fees2,499,862.28$ Project Contingencies16,499,091.02$ Sum TotalParking Spaces
  61. 61. Phase IVThe fourth phase will construct the Southwest quadrantincluding the structured parking. The Southwest quadrantwill contain 14,000 sq. ft. of recreational space including agym, locker rooms, and bicycles facilities, as well as 10,160sq. ft. of administration/classroom. The developmentcosts for the third phase total $5,516,016.61development programSouthwest QuadrantUse Mix Types Sq Ft Households Development Cost Comments58% Recreational 14,000 42 2,100,000.00$0% Retail 0 0 -$42% Admin/Class 10,160 30 1,524,000.00$0% Residential 0 0 -$Parking 72100% Totals 24,160 -17 Shared55 Total 554,800.00$4,178,800.00$501,456.00$ Consultant Fees835,760.00$ Project Contingencies5,516,016.00$ Sum TotalParking Spaces
  62. 62. Phase V-The fifth and final phase will construct the Northwest quadrantincluding the reflecting pool and Hippocrates’ Temple. TheNorthwest quadrant will contain 3,039 sq. ft. of retail, 74,460 sq.ft. of administration/classroom, and 74,460 sq. ft. of residentialincluding 74 household units. The development costs for thefifth phase total $28,535,832.62 development programNortheast QuadrantUse Mix Type Sq Ft Households Development Cost Comments2% Retail 3,466 10 519,856.50$49% Admin/Class 84,910 255 12,736,484.25$49% Residential 84,910 85 127 7,641,890.55$100% Totals 173,286 392-17 Shared375 Total 3,754,916.58$24,653,147.88$2,958,377.75$ Consultant Fees4,930,629.58$ Project Contingencies32,542,155.20$ Sum TotalParking Spaces
  63. 63. 63development programUse Mix Types Sq Ft Households3% Recreational 14,0002% Retail 8,263 950 Park Spaces less shared49% Admin/Class 212,592 285,064 Sqft Parking46% Residential 202,432100% 437,288202 Two bed apartments25 Households/acre51 Persons/acre155 On street Park spaces-41 Shared Park spaces795 Structured park spaces189,764 Structured park sqft3.0 Structured park floorsParking Spaces1,888,479.42$ Green Spaces629,493.14$ Micellaneous92,211,067.54$ Total Sum7,553,917.73$ Consultant Fees12,589,862.88$ Project Contingencies6,600,000.00$ Land Value (11+/- Acres)Rollins College South Lake Nona DistrictDevelopment Program Sum62,949,314.38$ Development Total Sum
  64. 64. 64“To protect the landscapes and waterways that sustain us as a nation define us as a people,we need a new way of looking at ourselves and the land around us.”-Jordan, Charles and Lawrence Selzer,Green Infrastructure, linking Landscapes and CommunitiesForeword xiii“The Built environment consists of the physical structures and organizations patterns ofbuildings, blocks neighborhoods, villages, towns, cities, and regions. The built environmentrequiresthesupportofeachofthesevenessentialsystemsofphysicalinfrastructure,resources,and operations components essential to the survival and health of each place.”-Coyle, StephenSustainable and Resilient CommunitiesA Comprehensive Action Plan for Towns, Cities and RegionsPage 1
  65. 65. 65“Whether you are a planner, engineer, architect, developer, builder, lawyer, financier,public official or in some other field involve with land use, it matters whether you believe inimportant walkable places and the quality of the public realm. If you view such places asvitally important, you will want to apply the principles of the New Urbanism to your work.”-Steuteville, Philip Langdon, and special Contributions, New Urbanism Best Principles GuidePage 10
  66. 66. UrbanPlanners +DesignersTKA& Co.

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