Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
cung cấp dịch vụ giúp việc quận 12 ở hcm
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

Share

Spring 2015- Work Sample II

Download to read offline

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Spring 2015- Work Sample II

  1. 1. Gregory 1 Education as an Education Topic Spring Work Sample 2015 Jordan Gregory Graduate Teacher Education Program Portland State University May 29, 2015
  2. 2. Gregory 2 Education as an Education Topic: Spring Work Sample 2015 By Jordan Gregory Part I: Context Geographic Setting, Location, and Local Business: Parkrose High School is located in the Parkrose neighborhood of Northeast Portland, east of I- 205. Parkrose High School is the only high school for the Parkrose School District, and serves approximately 1,033 students in the Argay, Russell, Parkrose Heights, and Maywood Park neighborhoods; the district also serves all residential properties along the Columbia River and near Portland International Airport, bringing a mix of socioeconomic communities into the student population (Movoto Community Profile, 2015; Parkrose School District, 2015). Housing options in the Parkrose Heights neighborhood consist of apartment complexes and modest midcentury houses, as evidenced by the photos below; these properties contrast with larger homes within Maywood Park and riverfront communities, and the impressive newer school facilities in the Parkrose district.
  3. 3. Gregory 3 Parkrose School District Boundaries, 2014-2015: Image courtesy of Parkrose School District Website The Parkrose district also covers several business districts along NE Sandy Boulevard, NE 102nd , NE 122nd , NE Halsey Street, and Cascade Station near the airport. Cascade Station is a large mall with parking and careful maintenance, and the nearby business districts have a mix of small local businesses, such as the German bakery on NE Sandy, and larger chains, such as K-Mart and various fast food restaurants on NE 122nd Avenue. Several students reported to me that they are currently seeking employment at the K-Mart across NE 122nd from the high school campus, as well as the various businesses in Cascade Station and Portland International Airport. The Parkrose campus is also unique in that it is situated across the street from Rossi Farms, one of the few working farms still within Portland city limits. Rossi Farms hosts regional events, and is a meaningful location for many local families. In addition to local business, Parkrose also has good access to libraries and public transportation. The W.A. Budden Library sits within district boundaries in the Russell neighborhood, and the Gregory Heights
  4. 4. Gregory 4 Library and Midland Library are located to the west and south of district boundaries, respectively. Public transportation is also an important community asset, with the Parkrose/Sumner Transit Center providing MAX and bus service to downtown and other parts of the Portland metro area. However, the strongest community resource for students is the high school itself. Parkrose High School doubles as a community center and SUN Community School for students and the surrounding neighborhoods, providing locals with a swim center, fitness center, athletic facilities, and SUN programs for ESL and language support, math support, technology, home economics, sports, dance, and mentoring and leadership programs, among others (Parkrose SUN Community School, 2015). With the high variation in socioeconomic status and access to community resources, the Parkrose community center and SUN school ensure that all students and community members have the support and resources they need to be successful.
  5. 5. Gregory 5 School Size, Socioeconomic Status, and Student Demographics: The student population at Parkrose High School is kind, welcoming, and representative of a wide array of linguistic, cultural, and socioeconomic groups. In our initial meeting, Ms. Ediza described her students as kind, and willing to help anyone who may need it; indeed, this has been my experience of students as I learn about the school and community (N. Ediza, conversation, March 17, 2015). Collectively, the 1,033 students at Parkrose speak over 41 languages, and approximately 67% of students need English Language Learner (ELL) services (N. Ediza, conversation, March 17, 2015; Oregon Schools Database, 2014). Parkrose is also rich in cultural diversity as well as linguistic diversity, with the majority of students identifying as nonwhite: 12.7% black, 21% hispanic, 19.6% Asian, 1.1% American Indian, and 8% other ethnicities (Oregon Schools Database, 2014). Image courtesy of The Oregonian, 2014 Oregon Schools Database Given the academic and cultural diversity of their school, Parkrose faculty offer services that are responsive to their students’ needs. Approximately 60% of students are in need of academic support services, such as IEP or ELL services (N. Ediza, conversation, March 17, 2015). With over 41 languages
  6. 6. Gregory 6 spoken at the high school, Parkrose faculty make an effort to offer materials and resources for families in several languages (Parkrose Staff Meeting, April 8, 2015). Recently, Parkrose expanded their presentations on the college application process to include the entire student body, not just students in AVID (Parkrose Staff Meeting, April 8, 2015). To draw as many families as possible to the meeting, Parkrose is offering pizza, materials translated into Spanish and Vietnamese, and interpreters, and Parkrose faculty are calling all families to connect with them about the event (Parkrose Staff Meeting, April 8, 2015). Overall, Parkrose High School, and Ms. Ediza’s classroom in particular, are welcoming environments for students of all backgrounds and ability levels. Historically, Parkrose High School has imposed rigorous academic demands on their students: almost 98% of freshmen and sophomores take Honors English, as part of a schoolwide initiative to discourage tracking, and to give all students an opportunity to succeed in a strong academic setting. Furthermore, students are challenged by the school’s AP course offerings: Literature, Composition, Biology, Calculus, World History, Psychology, and Statistics (Movoto Community Profile, 2015). According to Ms. Ediza, 50% of juniors stick with Honors curriculum, and take on at least one AP class (N. Ediza, conversation, March 17, 2015). Yet despite the efforts of teachers and support staff to foster academic success, many students continue to struggle. Almost half of the student body at Parkrose High School had at least one F on their last report card (N. Ediza, conversation, March 17, 2015). In order to be an effective educator at Parkrose High School, I need to be mindful of students’ needs, and respond with appropriate teaching practices and empathy. Attendance is also an issue at all grade levels. For the 2012-2013 school year, Parkrose experienced an absentee rate of 22.9%, meaning that 22.9% of students missed more than 10% of school days during that year (Oregon Schools Database, 2014). My current students were freshman during the 2012-2013 school year, and experienced an absentee rate of 18%; this rate has increased over time,
  7. 7. Gregory 7 resulting in approximately 8-10 students absent daily from Ms. Ediza’s classes (Oregon Schools Database, 2014). Parkrose is working to correct the attendance issue, with attendance directly tied to this year’s prom attendance. Additionally, Parkrose administration is considering moving the 7:50 am start time back one hour next year, to encourage more students to show up to class. Through these efforts, Parkrose High School hopes to foster an inviting learning environment for all learners. Image courtesy of The Oregonian, 2014 Oregon Schools Database Lastly, Parkrose also has high socioeconomic diversity, with at least 66.5% of the student body on free or reduced lunch (Oregon Schools Database, 2014; Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). From my own observations, some students come from severely low socioeconomic backgrounds, as they eat free or reduced breakfast, lunch, and dinner at Parkrose. The socioeconomic strain on students affects their academic performance and attitudes toward school. Low-income students experienced the second highest absentee rate during the 2012-2013 school year, which was 5% higher than the Oregon state average for low-income students, and almost 10% higher than the absentee rate for all students in Oregon (Oregon Schools Database, 2014). Furthermore, Ms. Ediza says that students’
  8. 8. Gregory 8 views of school are often strained, and that they need as much academic support and encouragement as possible. Many students are intimidated by the high cost of college tuition, and need help conceptualizing it as a feasible option; hopefully, Parkrose’s upcoming presentations on college application processes and financial aid will support students’ interests in college. Ms. Ediza also says that many students experience additional strain at home due to economic and personal circumstances, such that homework completion is often compromised, and weekends place a lot of stress on students as they enter a new school week. In order to be an effective educator at Parkrose, I need to be mindful and accommodating of my students’ circumstances, and show my support for their needs through my teaching practices and my organization of course content throughout the week. Schoolwide Achievement: OAKS Scores and Graduation Rates: Parkrose High School has experienced strong academic performance at the school level in recent years, as demonstrated by students’ performance on the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) tests. In the 2013-2014 school year, Parkrose High School experienced academic achievement in Reading and Writing that is on par with or above statewide averages (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). In Reading, 80.9% of Parkrose students met or exceeded, which is close to the state average of 85.6%, albeit slightly lower (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). In Writing, 47.1% of Parkrose students met or exceeded the standard, which is lower than the state average (61.3%) and like-school average (54.8%) (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). However, at the same time, Parkrose increased its percentage of students exceeding the Writing standard to 6.7%, which is above the state and like-school averages (6.1% and 4.6%, respectively). While Parkrose High School has seen minor fluctuations in OAKS performance, the scores are relatively solid, and demonstrate gains in the number of students who exceeded state standards. The schoolwide performance and trajectory as measured by the Oregon Department of Education Report
  9. 9. Gregory 9 Card for 2013-2014 indicates to me that students at Parkrose are generally strong in reading comprehension and analysis, but 19% still need support in these areas. More pressingly, approximately 52.9% of high school students tested did not meet state standards in writing, which indicates that students may need additional supports in this area. As part of my work sample unit, I intend to utilize Universal Design for Learning (UDL) strategies that will help support students with IEPs and English Language Learners, as well as other students who may need support in reading and writing. I intend to utilize graphic organizers for accessing unit content; outlines in order to scaffold students into explaining their ideas in writing; readings at different complexity levels to give all students opportunities to access unit content; and writing prompts designed with the needs of my students in mind. Image courtesy of Oregon Department of Education: Parkrose High School Report Card, 2013-2014 In addition to OAKS test scores, the graduation and continuing education rates at Parkrose High School are strong, and indicate that students are motivated and able to successfully pursue and achieve
  10. 10. Gregory 10 their post-secondary goals. For the 2013-2014 school year, 64.5% of students graduated with a regular diploma within four years of entering high school, and 80.7% completed high school within five years; both rates are close to the Oregon state averages of 68.7% and 81.5%, respectively (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). Furthermore, 44.4% of Parkrose students took the SAT in 2013-2014, far exceeding the Oregon state average of 33.3%, and the like-school average of 26.5% (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). Parkrose High School students also enter two- and four- year college programs at a higher rate than the state and like-school averages; approximately 62.4% of Parkrose students were enrolled in community colleges or four-year programs within 16 months of graduation, while the Oregon and like-school averages were each 54.7% (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). All of these factors indicate to me that Parkrose students have strong interests in college and career readiness beyond high school completion, and need support in these endeavors. In my work sample, I intend to focus on modes of persuasive writing, which are foundational skills for college and career readiness. Image courtesy of Oregon Department of Education: Parkrose High School Report Card, 2013-2014
  11. 11. Gregory 11 Description of Classroom and Learners: Ms. Nerissa Ediza teaches Newspaper, AVID, and three sections of English III in a classroom at the west end of Parkrose High School. The classrooms in Ms. Ediza’s hall are modular, with walls that can be folded away to accommodate larger or smaller class sizes; thus, there are two doors into Ms. Ediza’s room, and one wall folded away to fit her class. Her classroom is welcoming for all students, with inspirational posters on the walls, a classroom library along the back wall, and a collection of community resources, including school supplies and granola bars available to students who may need them. Given the wide range of socioeconomic needs within the district, Ms. Ediza wants to empower all of her students, and give them the resources they need to be successful in her class. The desks are arranged into groups for 4-6 students facing each other and the front whiteboard. There are three desktop computers in the classroom, which are primarily used for Newspaper class, but are also available for other student use during class activities. For classroom technology, Parkrose High School has a 1:1 iPad program, enabling Ms. Ediza to distribute class readings, assignments, and other resources through Google Drive, Notability, and Edmodo, and to collect assignments through Turnitin. Ms. Ediza’s iPad connects to the front projector for displaying videos, apps, and other media.
  12. 12. Gregory 12 Ms. Ediza’s 7th period English III class is representative of the school’s racial and socioeconomic diversity, and current student achievement. There are 31 students enrolled in 7th period: 14 identified as male, and 17 identified as female (Synergy, 2015). Of these 31 students, 12 identify as white, 7 identify as black, 6 identify as Hispanic, and 6 identify as Asian (Synergy, 2015). Given the high racial diversity in my classroom, I intend to incorporate a wide variety of text and media into my lesson plans. Culturally responsive curriculum must be representative of the school environment and student population; by discussing standardized tesing in the context of persuasive writing and emphasizing the voices of people of color in this controversy, I believe I will be covering both domains. In addition to racial diversity, over 50% of students in 7th period require accommodations as part of their learning plans. Of the 32 students in 7th period, 17 students need academic support services in the general education classroom: there are 6 students with IEPs, 9 students receiving ELL services or who are being monitored for ELL, and 2 students receiving both IEP and ELL supports (Synergy, 2015). In reviewing the IEPs for Students JL, TR, LP, JM, PS, EC, AM, and DS, the most common accommodations for these students include support and extensions for reading and writing tasks, and quiet spaces and emotional support to help students through frustration with schoolwork. I will strive to create graphic organizers to help these students to succeed in critical thinking and writing tasks, and will incorporate texts at varying lengths and complexity levels in order to support all students. Student JL will also need assignments with larger font sizes to accommodate his vision impairment, and Student DS
  13. 13. Gregory 13 will need more time to complete handwritten assignments or digital accommodations through her iPad or a classroom computer. Students KP, HN, KF, YF, LN, ND, BO, and EC are receiving ELL support services, and EM, JG, and PS are being monitored after finding success with ELL services. To support these students, I will incorporate a variety of texts to suit students’ abilities, create vocabulary lists for complex tasks, and offer guided lessons in annotating texts and organizing writing. To learn more about all of my students and their learning needs, beyond what is reported on IEPs and the Parkrose Synergy server, I conducted a Google Forms survey on student preferences in learning. Students completed this task in the first week of my work sample unit using their iPads. Through this platform, students were able to tell me what they do and do not enjoy in the classroom, how they prefer to complete assignments, and how I may support them in school and other endeavors. Below are copies of my survey questions, and student results.
  14. 14. Gregory 14
  15. 15. Gregory 15 7th Period Learner Profile Survey Student Language(s) Achievement Level: Winter 2015 (Grades and Behavior) Social Interaction (Based on Observations and/or IEPs) Learning Preferences Instructional Supports Needed (IEP, ELL, TAG, and/or self-identified) Implications for Instruction KP English, Vietnamese Current Grade: B KP works well with most stduents, but strongly prefers to work with students who speak Vietnamese. KP prefers individual assignments, or the option to work with other ELL students on group tasks. ELL; KP performs well in the classroom, but prefers to work with other ELL students. KP needs some checks for understanding, and encouragement when he offers responses in class. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for KP to develop English skills through speaking and listening, while also supporting him socially by providing opportunities to work with other ELL students. HN English Current Grade: A HN works well with most students and is very social, but strongly prefers to work with students who speak Vietnamese. HN prefers small group assignments, with the option to work with other ELL students on group tasks. ELL; HN performs well in the classroom, but prefers to work with other ELL students. HN needs some checks for understanding, and encouragement when he offers responses in class. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for HN to develop English skills through speaking and listening, while also supporting him socially by providing opportunities to work with other ELL students. KF English, Amharic Current Grade: F KF works well with most students, but prefers small- group work and individual tasks. KF prefers individual tasks and group assignments. ELL; KF performs well in the classroom but has had past difficulty keeping up with her coursework. KF may need extra time to complete assignments. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for KF to work in small-groups or individually, and allow her to take extra time to complete assignments. YF English, Spanish Current Grade: F YF is social with other ELL students who speak Spanish, but does not socialize with other students often. Attendance is an issue, with YF absent more often YF did not record any learning preferences. YF seems able to complete in-class work comfortably, but attendance is strongly impacting her grade and ELL; YF has fairly strong English skills, but is reluctant to participate in whole- group activities. To serve this student, I need to welcome YF to every class period she chooses to attend. I need to provide YF opportunities to work with other ELL students, but also helping her to develop confidence in her English abilties through small-group
  16. 16. Gregory 16 than present. learning abilities. work. JL English Current Grade: B JL is social, but his contributions to class activities are not always appreciated by his peers. JL prefers interactive learning experiences over individual work. JL is eager to participate in whole-class discussions. JL prefers speaking over reading and writing, and needs help with organization. IEP; performs well in the general education setting, but contributions are not always appreciated by peers; requires enlarged print to accommodate vision impairment; iPad as accommodation for reading and writing. To serve this student, I need to provide texts in larger font sizes, or digital accommodations to let JL adjust text. I need to offer support for JL’s contributions to class discussions, and frequent checks for understanding and on-task behavior to build classroom skills. EK English, Russian Current Grade: F EK works well with most students in the class. Some group configurations seem more distracting than helpful for EK. EK did not indicate any preferences. EK seems to enjoy individual learning tasks, with some opportunities to collaborate with his peers. EK has strong skills in English, but doesn’t often turn in assignments. To serve this student, I need to design lesson plans with opportunties for individual contributions and small-group collaboration. I need to check in frequently with EK to ensure that he is on-task and comfortable with his work. TR* *Work Samples provided in Appendices A, B, and C English Current Grade: F Somewhat resistant to instruction, but can be successful if given appropriate support. TR socializes with few students in the class. TR frequently checks in with peers if he does not understand learning tasks. TR prefers small group work and individualized instruction, and opportunities to work apart from peers so he can cope with overwhelming emotions. IEP; performs well on more individualized tasks; needs opportunities to learn away from distractions and stimuli; needs support in coping with stress and emotions. To serve this student, I need to design lesson plans with opportunities for individual contributions, so that TR can work apart from the class if he needs space to cope with overwhelming emotions. I need to offer frequent checks for understanding. LP English Current Grade: F LP has a few close friendships, and tries to be cordial with staff. LP is working on advocating for himself in the general education environment. LP prefers small group work and individualized instruction, and opportunities to work apart from peers so he can cope with overwhelming emotions. IEP; performs well on more individualized tasks, but frequently refuses to work or is easily distracted by technology; needs support in copiing with stress and emotions. IEP suggests altered To serve this student, I need to offer frequent checks for understanding and on-task behavior. I need to work with LP’s willingness to work at any level, and accept whatever work he is willing to complete for class.
  17. 17. Gregory 17 assignments and expectations. SeM English Current Grade: F SeM has a few close friends in the class, and generally works well with all students. SeM prefers small group work and individual assignments over whole-class discussions. SeM contributes positively to her class, but does not always complete work on time. SeM is frustrated when teacher feedback is incomprehensible or slow to reach her. To serve this student, I need to communicate expectations clearly and efficiently. I need to grade SeM’s work quickly, and provide useful feedback to help her feel successful. SaM English Current Grade: D SaM has a few close friends in the class, and generally works well with all students. SaM prefers small group work and individual assignments over whole-class discussions. SaM contributes positively to her class, but does not always complete work on time. SaM is comfortable working with other to support her learning. To serve this student, I need to communicate expectations clearly and efficiently. I need to create opportunities for SaM to check in with me and her peers about course concepts. SA English Current Grade: B SA is highly social, but has some difficult relationships with some students in the classroom, especially HS. SA prefers small- group work and individual assignments. SA tends to check out of whole-class discussions or activities, and needs frequent checks for on-task behavior. SA contributes positively to his class, but only when he is separated from HS and other difficult groupings in the classroom. SA often needs help with understanding assignment instructions. To serve this student, I need to communicate expectations clearly and efficiently. I need to have accessible language in all classroom tasks, and frequent check-ins for understanding and on-task behaviors. I need to separate SA and HS, and support positive relationships between them. LN English, Vietnamese Current Grade: B LN works well with most students in the class, but strongly prefers to work with other students who speak Vietnamese. LN prefers individual assignments and small-group work, especially with other ELL students. ELL; success with ELL services, but needs support in building confidence in his speaking abilities. To serve this student, I need to provide LN opportunities to practice English speaking skills in ways that are comfortable and supportive. I need to give LN opportunities to work with other Vietnamese speakers. JoM *Work Samples English Current Grade: B JoM works well with most students in the class, and enjoys small-group tasks JoM prefers small- group tasks with a select group of classmates, and opportunities to JoM may need to be redirected to class assignments on occasion, but is mostly on-task and To serve this student, I need to provide JoM opportunities to read and learn at his own pace, as well as opportunities to work in
  18. 18. Gregory 18 provided in Appendices A, B, and C with those individuals. read and explore course content on his own time. working positively with others. groups in which he is comfortable. EM English, Spanish Current Grade: A EM works well with most students in the class, but strongly prefers to work with other ELL students, especially JG. EM prefers small- group tasks with select classmates, especially JG. May be off-task in certain groupings. ELL; success with ELL services, and is currently being monitored. EM is frustrated when grades and expectations are not clearly communicated. To serve this student, I need to provide EM opportunities to work with other ELL students, and communicate my grades clearly and quickly. ND *Work Samples provided in Appendices A, B, C, and D English, Vietnamese Current Grade: A ND prefers individual learning tasks, but works well with most students in the class. ND is a hardworking student, and is successful with most classroom tasks. ND has expressed a lot of anxiety about assignment completion. ELL; strong communication skills, but strongly prefers to work with other ELL students instead of working with native speakers. ND is very bright, but doubts her academic abilities and needs encouragement. To serve this student, I need to communicate clear expectations in order to alleviate ND’s anxiety about school performance. TS English Current Grade: B TS is highly social, with many different students in the class. TS may be off-task in certain groupings. TS enjoys whole- class discussions and Socratic seminars, and does well on other learning tasks as well. TS is strong academically, but sometimes needs support in organization. TS is very social, and may need check-ins from instructors for positive behaviors. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for TS to learn through social interactions, but also check in for understanding, organization, and on-task behaviors. BO English, Spanish Current Grade: N/A (new to class) BO strongly prefers to work with other ELL students, especially students who speak Spanish. BO prefers individual learning tasks, or opportunities to collaborate with other ELL students. ELL; BO seems to work well with most students, but lacks confidence in her English speaking abilities. BO has attendance issues, and is absent more often than she is present in school. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for BO to work with ELL students, while also building her confidence in her speaking skills. I need to welcome BO to every class period that she chooses to attend.
  19. 19. Gregory 19 JG English, Spanish Current Grade: C JG works well with most students in the class, and participates in whole-class discussions. JG strongly prefers to work with EM, but may be off-task in this context. JG prefers opportunities for discussion and collaboration, especially with EM and other ELL students. ELL; success with ELL services, and is currently being monitored. JG may have difficulty with assignments and text in English, and will need extra written and verbal support from instructors. To serve this student, I need to provide clear instructions on all learning tasks, with frequent checks for understanding. I also need to monitor JG’s social interactions to ensure that he stays on-task. JM English Current Grade: B JM has excellent social skills and utilizes them for positive classroom contributions. JM is hardworking and is successful with most classrom tasks. JM identifies her strength as reading. IEP; struggles with reading fluency; scattered testing outcomes and needing further evaluation; writing goals include measurement by 8th grade rubric, requires modified assignments. To serve this student, I need to be mindful of JM’s goals related to reading and writing. I need to keep expectations in line with her IEP goals, and provide supports for comprehension, and reading and writing fluency. CO English Current Grade: N/A (enrolled as Teacher Assistant) N/A N/A N/A In my work sample, I will consider ways to utilize CO as an asset to the classroom. CO is enrolled in AP English, and may be able to connect with peers and help them with more efficacy than instructors in the room. AS English Current Grade: F AS works well with most students in the class, and prefers to work with the students seated close to her. AS prefers writing, small-group assignments, and opportunities to learn about relevant topics and life skills. AS is easily frustrated by off- task behaviors in the classroom. AS may need help with organization and clarity in her written responses, but contributes positively to academic topics and the classroom culture. To serve this student, I need to check in with AS to ensure that she is understanding course content and writing cogently on course subjects. I need to create a curriculum that feels relevant to AS, and helps her to develop skills that she feels will be important to her later in life. CB English, Spanish Current Grade: A CB works well with most students in the class. CB tends to work with ELL students, and CB prefers individual and small-group tasks. CB may become off-task with group CB may need support with staying on task, and comprehending summative assessments. Through To serve this student, I need to check in with CB to ensure positive behaviors. I need to consider ways to build CB’s confidence in the positive
  20. 20. Gregory 20 contributes positively to their English language development. work, but contributes positively to most classroom tasks. conversation and collaboration, CB learns well. contributions she makes to the classroom environment. HS English Current Grade: B HS socializes well with a select group of peers, but does not work well with SA. HS exhibits some resistance to contact from teachers, and prefers to work without intervention. HS prefers individualized learning tasks, without much intervention by instructors. HS has some difficulty with assignment instructions, and needs opportunities to engage with instructors on her own terms. HS is hostile to too much intervention from instructors. To serve this student, I need to respect HS’s boundaries for social intereaction and personal space, while still checking in on occasion to make sure that HS is understanding course content. KM English Current Grade: B KM socializes well with a select group of peers. KM prefers to work with close friends, but works well with most students in the class. Good rapport with teachers. KM prefers small- group work with self-selected groups, or individual learning tasks. KM prefers individual tasks, and would prefer to have more opportunities to read by herself in class. To serve this student, I need to allow KM to have opportunities to work by herself, or to self-select groups for the best learning outcomes. I need to provide a wide variety of text to engage KM in class activities and subjects. PS English, Lao Current Grade: D PS socializes well with a select group of peers, and also works well with most students in the class. Does not seek teacher intervention, and may resist it if offered. PS prefers individual learning tasks, but may require some intervention or checks for understanding from instructor. ELL; success with ELL services, and is currently being monitored. IEP; strong reading skills, but needs support with fluency. To serve this student, I need to allow PS to have opportunities to work by herself, but with occasional checks for understanding. I need to provide graphic organizers and vocabulary to continue to develop reading skills. AlM English Current Grade: A AlM socializes well with a select group of peers. AlM prefers to work with close friends, but works well with most AlM prefers small- group work with self-selected groups, or individual learning tasks. AlM does not enjoy persuasive and nonfiction writing, and may need extra support and encouragement given my work sample topic. To serve this student, I need to allow AlM to have opportunities to work by herself, or to self-select groups for the best learning outcomes. I need to check in with AlM regularly to ensure that she is
  21. 21. Gregory 21 students in the class. Good rapport with teachers. comfortable with persuasive writing tasks within my work sample unit. EC English Current Grade: F EC socializes well with most peers, and has several close friendships. EC does not seek help if he is not understanding something, but is receptive to assistance when offered. EC prefers individualized learning tasks. EC does not seek help if he is not understanding something, but is receptive to assistance when it is offered. ELL; IEP; developing reading and writing skills; needs help with developing fluency in both areas. To serve this student, I need to design lessons with graphic organizers, vocabulary, and other supports for EC’s developing literacy skills. ZC English Current Grade: F ZC socializes well with most peers, but occasionally has outbursts or conflicts with other students. ZC seems to work best if she can self-select a group or choose to work by herself. ZC prefers individualized learning tasks or opportunities to self-select groups for assignments AVID; ZC is very bright, but is frustrated by learning tasks that do not feel meaningful to her, such as organizational aspects of AVID. To serve this student, I need to design lessons that give ZC options, so that she can select the option that works best for her mood and learning style. I need to encourage ZC in both English and AVID, and to see how these courses can support each other. MT English Current Grade: C MT works well with most students in the class, and has good rapport with teachers. MT prefers individualized learning tasks. MT may try to mask a lack of comprehension in class, but is receptive to instructor feedback. MT generally does not seek instructor help if he does not understand course work, but is receptive to feedback. Frequent checks for understanding would help MT. To serve this student, I need to design lesson plans that allow individual or self-selected group work, and opportunities to informally check for understanding. VN English Current Grade: B VN is friendly to his peers, but does not seek opportunities to interact with them. VN strongly prefers individual learning tasks. VN prefers individual learning tasks. VN moves quickly through class assignments, and may need supplemental materials to encourage deeper VN moves quickly through class materials, and may need supplemental materials to encourage critical thinking and deeper analysis. To serve this student, I need to respect VN’s boundaries surrounding social interaction and collaboration, and provide opportunities to advance his thinking through additional course materials.
  22. 22. Gregory 22 analysis. AM English Current Grade: F AM works well with most students. AM may not be receptive to instructor feedback, but generally has good rapport with her teachers. AM works well on most learning tasks, but may prefer individualized assignments. AM may try to mask a lack of comprehension in class, but is receptive to instructor feedback. IEP; goals include reading comprehension, fluency, and expressing opinions in writing. Needs supports for these areas, and additional time to complete assignments. To serve this student, I need to design lesson plans that provide graphic organizers, vocabulary, and outlines to help AM comprehend course materials and form opinions about persuasive texts. I need to allow additional time for AM to complete assignments. DS English Current Grade: A DS works well with some students. IEP includes goals for social interactions, which are sometimes strained by DS’s lack of response to social cues. DS works well on most learning tasks. DS seems to prefer collaborative assignments if given the opportunity to self-select groups that value her contributions. IEP; strong reading and writing skills, but may require digital accommodations to keep pace with her peers. IEP goals target social interactions. Needs support for working well with other students. To serve this student, I need to provide opportunities for DS to self-select a group that will value her skills and contributions.
  23. 23. Gregory 23 Implications for Practice: Through examining data from my Learner Profile Chart in tandem with data from student grades, summative assessments, and my own observations, I can see the full range of needs and interests for each of my students. Overall, 7th period has high populations of students with IEPs or who are receiving ELL services, and two AVID students; the impllication for practice therein is a need for strong differentiation. In my work sample unit, I intend to use several Universal Design for Learning (UDL) strategies. UDL graphic organizers will provide students with support for group discussions, reading comprehension and fluency, and organizing ideas in writing, if they need them. Furthermore, these strategies will also help accelerated learners to stay organized as my unit presents new ideas about persuasive writiing. If UDL strategies are not working for students with IEPs, I will be able to assist these students individually while other students work independently or in small groups. In addition to UDL strategies, I will provide a wide variety of texts and assignment options, to accommodate the range of learning needs in 7th period. Students with IEPs may self-select simpler texts and assignments that do not sacrifice content, while accelerated learners and AVID students may challenge themselves by self- selecting complex texts and assignments, or additional readings on top of classroom activities. To accommodate the wide range of emotional needs in 7th period, as evidenced by students’ IEP goals and my own observations, I will strive to create opportunities for students to select assignments and tasks that best match their learning styles and needs. Students may work individually or in the hallway if they need a quiet space in order to be successful. Students may also self-select groups that will value their skills, abilities, and contributions; to further support Students JL and DS, I will structure whole-class and small-group discussions so that all voices are valued. Through all of these accommodations in my work sample unit, I hope to support the existing classroom culture of respect and equity, and empower all students to learn in their own style.
  24. 24. Gregory 24 Part Two: Design for Instruction and Assessment Rationale: The purpose of this unit is to expand students’ understanding and mastery of persuasive modes of writing, especially Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. In this unit, students will explore persuasive nonfiction texts that explore the pros and cons of standardized testing in public education, identify different persuasive modes utilized by the authors, and ultimately form their own opinions about standardized testing that are evidence-based and communicated through persuasive writing and classroom conversations. The unit will culminate in a persuasive writing paragraph that identifies the key persuasive modes of writing used in a nonfiction text, and then clearly communicates students’ responses to the central claim. This unit of instruction is relevant to my students and their classroom context, because persuasive writing is a foundational skill for success in college and career, while also complying with Common Core State Standards for Reading Informational Text, Writing, and Speech. As a whole, Parkrose High School is academically motivated: students at PHS take the SAT and other college entrance exams at a higher rate than the state and like-school averages, and more quickly enroll in community college or four-year universities at a faster rate than other school communities in Oregon (Oregon Department of Education Report Card, 2014). To promote student success in these rigorous academic environments, it is essential that I help students to develop foundational skills in reading informational texts and persuasive writing. Lastly, students will identify modes of persuasive writing used to support or condemn standardized testing; this topic is highly relevant to students, as they prepare to take the Smarter Balanced assessment (SBAC) this May, and should be prepared to understand the reasons or justifications for testing, as well as the arguments against this system. Furthermore, 7th period English III
  25. 25. Gregory 25 is diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, language backgrounds, and learning needs; all of these domains impact standardized testing, and students deserve a complete understanding of the ways that SBAC and similar assessments complement or deviate from their learning styles. Students will also explore a diverse selection of texts, which include voices from their own racial or linguistic backgrounds. Through culturally-responsive texts and subject matter that is relevant to adolescents’ experiences of teaching and learning, I believe my unit of instruction will engage all students in exploring persuasive modes of writing. Essential Question: How do authors utilize Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to communicate their ideas about standardized testing? Unit Goals: Over the course of this unit, students will:  Deepen their understanding of persuasive writing, and conceptualize and analyze arguments for their uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos  Read and understand a variety of complex texts  Write in a variety of styles and for a variety of purposes  Analyze an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in a course text, and communicate their analysis and response in writing  Present comprehension of unit content through writing and speaking
  26. 26. Gregory 26 Common Core State Standards:  RI.11-12.1: “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.”  RI.11-12.5: “Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.”  RI.11-12.6: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.”  RI.11-12.7: “Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.”  W.11-12.1: “Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.”  W.11-12.6: “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.”  W.11-12.8: “Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.”
  27. 27. Gregory 27  SL.11-12.1: “Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on- one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.”  SL.11-12.3: “Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.”  L.11-12.3: “Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.” Assessment Plan: Over the course of this unit, students will explore a wide variety of texts and media in order to familiarize themselves with the persuasive modes of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. To assess students, Ms. Ediza and I will ask students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of persuasive writing through formative assessments, such as warm-up writing activities, prewriting, or exit slips; written responses to daily readings, such as journal prompts or exit slips; whole-class and small-group discussions, including a Socratic seminar; and finally, through an analysis paragraph that identifies the persuasive modes of writing in a course text, and then responds to the claims therein with students’ evidence-based opinions. On April 16, 2015, I administered a Pre-Assessment to all three sections of English III. Students were asked to read passages from course texts, and identify the mode of persuasive writing utilized by the author; match the terms Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to their definitions; and describe and analyze a political cartoon that criticizes standardized testing, and identify the visual elements in the piece that show the artist’s uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.
  28. 28. Gregory 28 My Pre-Assessment is designed to assess the preconceptions and misconceptions that students may have about Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and how these modes of persuasive writing are used in text and media. To support their claims, authors and artists rely on the credibility of the author as justification for their ideas on a given topic (Ethos), the emotions evoked by the author’s subject and writing (Pathos), or the logic and data supporting the author’s claims (Logos). To be successful in college and career, my English III students need to be able to identify these three modes as they occur in persuasive writing, and evaluate their efficacy in supporting the author’s claims. In my Pre-Assessment (below), I gave students opportunities to identify modes of persuasive writing, and to analyze the efficacy of these modes as they occur in a political cartoon. Through analyzing the results of my Pre- Assessment, I can clearly see the strengths and areas for improvement in students’ prior knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and can adjust my lesson plans to accommodate students’ needs. To evaluate students’s responses to the political cartoon, I used a rubric developed by Ms. Ediza for her proficiency grading throughout the school year, shown below. I modified the rubric slightly to include language specific to this learning task, namely Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. To demonstrate mastery of unit content, students must clearly identify the mode(s) of persuasive writing utilized in the political cartoon, describe evidence to support their claim that the artist is using these modes of persuasion, and analyze the efficacy of the political cartoon’s use of persuasive techniques. Overall, students in 7th period answered that the political cartoon described standardized tests as unfair, but were unable to provide textual evidence and clearly link that evidence to Ethos, Pathos, or Logos. As I develop my work sample lessons, I need to encourage students to use textual evidence to support their claims, and analyze the effects of that evidence on readers. By the end of this unit, students should be able to identify Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in persuasive texts, and evaluate the efficacy of those rhetorical appeals in supporting an author’s claims.
  29. 29. Gregory 29 NAME: ___________________________________________ PERIOD: __________________ You Have Me Convinced! Let’s see what you know about persuasion. DIRECTIONS: Read each of the passages below. Then, circle the mode of persuasion used in the passage. Passage One: “Needless to say, a lot of teachers aren’t happy about it. Who can blame them? If you could get away with doing your job, avoiding any of those nasty quarterly reports that you have to deal with, wouldn’t you do so? The truth is that these exams aren’t just about testing students, but more importantly our teachers. Teachers, those folks who often spend 8 hours a day with your children or young adults? Yeah, those guys.” 1. Passage One uses: A. Ethos B. Pathos C. Logos Passage Two: “When I look at the students in my history classes, I see young people who may be the next to turn the world inside out. Garfield [High School] has a long tradition of cultivating abstract thinking, lyrical innovation, trenchant debate, civic leadership, moral courage, and myriad other qualities for which our society is desperate, yet which cannot be measured, or inspired, by bubbling answer choice ‘E.’” 2. Passage Two uses: A. Ethos B. Pathos C. Logos Passage Three: “Those test-crazed districts need to be reeled in. But a new study by Teach Plus, an organization that advocates for students in urban schools, found that on average, in grades three and seven, just 1.7 percent of classroom time is devoted to preparing for and taking standardized tests. That’s not outrageous at all. Most people spend a larger percentage of their waking day choosing an outfit to wear or watching TV.” 3. Passage Three uses: A. Ethos B. Pathos C. Logos
  30. 30. Gregory 30 DIRECTIONS: Match each word to the appropriate definition. ethos pathos logos 4. ______________________ is a persuasive technique that relies on studies, statistics, and facts to support an argument. The author uses facts and data as much as possible to prove that their argument is correct. 5. ______________________ is a persuasive technique that relies on emotions to support an argument. The author will write something that moves the audience in some way--it could make them mad, sad, motivated to change something, etc. 6. ______________________ is a persuasive technique that relies on the credibility of the author. The author could be someone important or directly connected to the subject being discussed, and so the audience is more likely to believe their argument. DIRECTIONS: Use the image below to answer the questions on the following page.
  31. 31. Gregory 31 7. What is the message of this cartoon? Summarize the main idea in one sentence. 8. Explain how this cartoon uses mode(s) of persuasion to convince the audience of its message. Refer to specific elements in the cartoon, and explain how they show persuasive techniques. Do you think these mode(s) of persuasion are effective? Why or why not? ______________________________________________________________________________ To assess students on my Pre- and Post-Assessments, I will use the following rubric, developed by Ms. Ediza and modified by me to include unit-specific content: Criteria Not Yet Proficient: 0.0 Proficient: 85.0 Mastery: 100.0 Thesis: 25% Thesis does not identify any modes of persuasive writing or its impact on the author’s claim. Thesis identifies mode of persuasive writing, and offers basic comments on its impact on the author’s claim. Thesis clearly identifies one or more modes of persuasive writing, and offers detailed explanation of their impact on the author’s claim. Writing avoids cliches, and shows student’s original thinking. Evidence: 25% Student describes little to no evidence to support their claims. Student describes some basic evidence to support their claims. More evidence is present in the text, but is not explored in student work. Student clearly supports their claims with detailed evidence. Student writing is thorough, and describes multiple supports for their claims. Commentary: 25% Student does not synthesize thesis and evidence. Links between them are weak or incomprehensible. Student synthesizes thesis and evidence. The links between them are clear. Student synthesizes thesis and evidence clearly and effectively. The reader is persuaded by student commentary. Analysis: 25% Student does not connect evidence to their own ideas. There is no claim on the efficacy of the persuasive text. Student connects evidence to their own ideas. Student offers basic analysis of the efficacy of the persuasive text. Student uses clear, evaluative thinking to connect evidence to their own ideas. Analysis is targeted, insightful, and succinct.
  32. 32. Gregory 32 To show student growth over the course of my teaching, I will administer an identical Post- Assessment at the end of my work sample unit. Additionally, my work sample unit will include a Summative Assessment Paragraph that focuses on the skills identified in the rubric above: students will write a paragraph that identifies the mode(s) of persuasive writing used in a course text, and analyzes and comments on their efficacy. The minimum requirement for the Summative Assessment will be one paragraph that clearly covers the skills in the rubric, but there is no limit to the amout of analysis students wish to offer; this keeps the assignment guidelines accessible for students with IEPs and English Language Learners, while also giving accelerated learners and AVID students opportunities to delve deeper into the assignment. Students will work individually on the Pre- and Post-Assessments and the Summative Assessment, and will submit the Summative Assessment to Turnitin.com for final grading. The Summative Assessment guidelines are presented on the following page. The instructions were developed by Ms. Ediza, are modeled after her previous “2-chunk paragraph” assignments, which ask students to present an idea or claim, and then support it with two pieces of textual evidence and commentary. To support students with IEPs and English Language Learners in organizing their ideas for the Summative Assessment, the assignment instructions are written as an outline, giving students a skeletal format to follow in order to achieve all of the areas covered in the rubric; this structure will be further supported by the Claim-Support Question outlines used at the end of this work sample unit, which follow a similar path to critical thinking. Additionally, students will be supported through copious notes in their notebook, for which students must identify instances of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in course texts and analyze their uses.
  33. 33. Gregory 33 NAME: ___________________________________________ PERIOD: __________________ You Have Me Convinced! Let’s see what you know about persuasion. DIRECTIONS: Write a “2-chunk” paragraph analyzing an author’s rhetorical appeals, such as Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. Use the following format to guide your writing:  Topic Sentence: In ____________________ (name of article), ___________________ (name of author) uses rhetorical appeals to support their claim that ________________.  Concrete Detail: TLQ (Transition, Lead-In, Quote) your quote.  Commentary: Name the type of rhetorical appeal (Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos) and explain why it’s that type of appeal.  Add more commentary as needed to explain your ideas.  Concrete Detail: TLQ (Transition, Lead-In, Quote) your quote.  Commentary: Name the type of rhetorical appeal (Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos) and explain why it’s that type of appeal.  Add more commentary as needed to explain your ideas.  Concluding Sentence: Overall, how does the author use Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos to support their claim? Is their use of these rhetorical appeals effective? Why or why not? Submit your assignment to turnitin.com for grading. Scores of “1” mean that the paragraph does not yet meet proficiency; check the comments section for our suggestions, and edit and resubmit your paragraph. The Rhetorical Appeals Paragraph follows the proficiency grading formula explained in the front of your notebook:  First Paragraph (complete for a C in the class): 150 Points  Second Paragraph (complete for an A or B in the class): 50 Points
  34. 34. Gregory 34 In order to monitor and achieve the goals of this unit, I will utillize the following Pre- and Post- Assessment strategies throughout my work sample: Unit Goal Pre-Assessment Post-Assessment Associated CCSS Standards Deepen their understanding of persuasive writing, and conceptualize and analyze arguments for their uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. Pre-Assessment: Students will demonstrate prior knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other activities. Post-Assessment: Students will demonstrate knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Over time, students will demonstrate deeper understanding of persuasive writing and critical thinking through exit slips, journals, and other activities. Summative Assessment: Students will demonstrate mastery of identification and analysis of modes of persuasive writing through a one- paragraph dissection of a course text. RI.11-12.1: “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysisof what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.” RI.11-12.5: “Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.” RI.11-12.6: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.” W.11-12.1: “Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” SL.11-12.3: “Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.” L.11-12.3: “Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.” Read and understand a variety of complex texts. Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate understanding of texts and media, as well as progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate understanding of texts and media, as well as progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other RI.11-12.1: “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysisof what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.” RI.11-12.5: “Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing,
  35. 35. Gregory 35 activities. activities. Comprehension and analysis will deepen over time. and engaging.” RI.11-12.6: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.” RI.11-12.7: “Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.” Write in a variety of styles and for a variety of purposes. Pre-Assessment: Students will demonstrate prior knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other activities. Post-Assessment: Students will demonstrate knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Over time, students will demonstrate deeper understanding of persuasive writing and critical thinking through exit slips, journals, and other activities. W.11-12.1: “Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” W.11-12.6: “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.” W.11-12.8: “Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.” Analyze an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in a course text, and communicate their analysis and response in writing. Pre-Assessment: Students will demonstrate prior knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other Post-Assessment: Students will demonstrate knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Over time, students will demonstrate deeper understanding of persuasive writing and critical thinking through exit slips, journals, and RI.11-12.1: “Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysisof what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.” RI.11-12.5: “Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.” RI.11-12.6: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content
  36. 36. Gregory 36 activities. Formative assessments will give students the freedom to take risks in their evaluation and analysis of author’s modes of persuasive writing. other activities. Formative assessments will give students the freedom to take risks in their evaluation and analysis of author’s modes of persuasive writing, and students will gain confidence over time. Summative Assessment: Students will demonstrate mastery of identification and analysis of modes of persuasive writing through a one- paragraph dissection of a course text. contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.” W.11-12.1: “Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” Present comprehension of unit content through writing and speaking. Pre-Assessment: Students will demonstrate prior knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Students will demonstrate progress toward daily learning objectives through exit slips, journals, and other activities. Formative assessments will give students the freedom to take risks in their evaluation and analysis of author’s modes of persuasive writing. Post-Assessment: Students will demonstrate knowledge of persuasive writing through identification, matching, and analysis. Formative Assessments: Over time, students will demonstrate deeper understanding of persuasive writing and critical thinking through exit slips, journals, and other activities. Formative assessments will give students the freedom to take risks in their evaluation and analysis of author’s modes of persuasive writing, and students will gain confidence over time. Summative Assessment: W.11-12.1: “Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.” W.11-12.6: “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.” W.11-12.8: “Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.” SL.11-12.1: “Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and
  37. 37. Gregory 37 Students will demonstrate mastery of identification and analysis of modes of persuasive writing through a one- paragraph dissection of a course text. persuasively.” SL.11-12.3: “Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.” L.11-12.3: “Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.” Unit Schedule and Outline: Date Unit Goals Lesson Objectives and Activities Assessment April 16th through April 20th , 2015  Deepen their understanding of persuasive writing, and conceptualize and analyze arguments for their uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos  Read and understand a variety of complex texts In this lesson set, students will access their prior knowledge of persuasive writing, and expand their schema to include Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. Students will read a variety of texts that explore modes of persuasive writing on the topic of standardized testing, and identify key characteristics of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos therein. Students will complete a Pre-Assessment on their abilities to identify, define, and analyze modes of persuasive writing. Then, students will be assessed through formative assessments, including journal prompts, warm-up activities, and exit slips. April 21st through April 23th , 2015  Deepen their understanding of persuasive writing, and conceptualize and analyze arguments for their uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos  Read and understand a variety of complex texts  Write in a variety of styles and for a variety of purposes In this lesson set, students will spend 1-2 days each on Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. Students will examine multiple viewpoints on standardized tests as expressed in texts and media. Students wil continue to chart new information in their Argument Retrieval Chart, and communicate their understanding of course concepts through collaborative tasks, discussions, and formative assessments. Instructors will introduce the Summative Assessment, or a paragraph identifying and analyzing an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and/or Students will continue to participate in formative assessments, including journal prompts, warm-up activities, and exit slips. Students will prepare notes for a Socratic seminar on standardized testing, in which they must utilize at least one of the modes of persuasive writing discussed in this unit. Instructors will introduce the
  38. 38. Gregory 38 Logos. Instructors will help students to prepare for this assignment throughout these lessons. Summative Assessment, or a paragraph identifying and analyzing an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos. April 24th , 2015  Present comprehension of unit content through writing and speaking Students will participate in a Socratic seminar, in which students will articulate their viewpoint (or a viewpoint assigned to them) using the modes of persuasive writing discussed in the unit. Students should be prepared to discuss any of the perspectives presented in class, including perspectives they may not agree with. Students will demonstrate their understanding of course concepts through articulating their stance (or a stance assigned to them) using one or more of the modes of persuasive writing discussed in this unit. April 27th through April 29th , 2015  Analyze an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in a course text, and communicate their analysis and response in writing  Present comprehension of unit content through writing and speaking Students will complete a Post- Assessment on unit content, and demonstrate their understanding of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos as a result of this instructional unit. To conclude the unit, students will complete a Claim-Support-Question activity while watching “Changing Education Paradigms” by Sir Ken Robinson; this learning task will support students’ critical thinking and analysis, and provide a writing template to apply to their Summative Assessment paragraphs. Students may also have time to articulate any lingering thoughts on Ethos, Pathos, and Logos as a result of the previous class unit. Lastly, students will complete a self- evaluation on their participation in this unit, and their understanding of persuasion. Students will complete a Post-Assessment and their Summative Assessment to demonstrate their understanding of course concepts. Students will also complete a self- evaluation, which will help instructors to make informed decisions about grading, or expanding the unit.
  39. 39. Gregory 39 Considerations for Classroom Instruction Attention to Literacy: Ms. Ediza’s 7th period class presents a wide variety of literacy levels. Some students in 7th period are high achieving in reading and writing. Indeed, before and after class, several students seek to tell me about their current book selections or writing projects; these students are also highly successful in English III, as reflected by their grades. At the same time, many 7th period students currently have Fs in English III. While some of these may be attributed to problems with attendance, participation, and/or circumstances outside of the classroom, others may be due to students’ struggles to access course content. Furthermore, several IEPs for 7th period include accommodations and learning goals tied to reading comprehension, reading fluency, and organizing writing. To serve all of these students in the general education setting, I need to develop strong differentiation in all of my lesson plans. Given the wide array of learning needs in 7th period, I will support the literacy levels of my students through utilizing a wide variety of texts and media in my lessons. Standardized testing, namely the recent Smarter Balanced assessments (SBAC) created in tandem with Common Core State Standards, are a controversial topic that has been explored by students, teachers, parents, and other stakeholders in the public education system. Students will explore all of these demographics through news articles, blog posts, and cartoons from a variety of sources. Lessons will also include an RSA Animate presentation of Changing Education Paradigms by Sir Ken Robinson (2010), as well as several video resources on the meanings of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. The multimodal nature of my work sample unit will support all learners in accessing content, including students with IEPs for literacy skills, and English Language Learners who may need extra support in reading comprehension and communication.
  40. 40. Gregory 40 In addition to the variety of texts in my work sample unit, I will also offer graphic organizers, guided lessons on annotating texts and taking notes, frequent opportunities for discussion, and an outlining tool to prepare students for their Summative Assessment. Through class discussions, students will access their prior knowledge on what it means to be a good speaker and note-taker, and then build upon these skills through guided in-class instruction. These highly structured strategies witll create clear expectations for the Socratic seminar toward the end of the unit, and give students multiple ways of understanding the differences between Ethos, Pathos, and Logos. By the end of this unit, students will have developed stronger literacy skills not only in reading, but in dissecting and analyzing informational texts for a clear understanding of their modes of persuasion. Furthermore, graphic organizers, a Claim- Support-Question activity, and a Summative Assessment outline will help students with developing literacies, including English Language Learners, with organizing course content for later analysis in the Socratic seminar and Summative Assessment. Collaboration: To prepare for my work sample unit, I collaborated with my cooperating teacher, Ms. Nerissa Ediza. Ms. Ediza is a kind, knowledgeable, and reflective practitioner who is aware of teaching strategies that resonate well with her 7th period students. As we collaborated on my work sample, Ms. Ediza helped to strengthen my Pre- and Post-Assessments, by suggesting I expand my question formats to include multiple ways of reaching students as well as to discern whether they understand course content or are just guessing on the assessments. As I prepared my lessons for this unit, Ms. Ediza pointed out ways that I can support ELL students and students with IEPs. She emphasized continuous monitoring of student progress throughout the class period and highly structured lessons, because overreliance on self-directed learning may lead to ELL students and students with IEPs getting stuck and
  41. 41. Gregory 41 shutting down in class. I am grateful to Ms. Ediza for her guidance and her expertise on her studnets’ needs. In addition to collaborating with my cooperating teacher, I also collaborated with my students, in the hopes of getting the best possible feedback on their learning needs. Several students with IEPs have learning and transitional goals related to self-advocacy, both in and outside of the classroom; to support these goals, I invited student feedback through an introductory notecard activity, informal conversations, and a Google Forms survey targeting student’s interests and learning preferences. Through all of these means, I am helping all students, with or without IEPs, to learn to articulate their learning needs to other stakeholders in their educations. Through these efforts, I have learned about students’ preferences for individualized assignments, high-quality instruction during class time with less emphasis on homework and additional stressors, and signals from students that indicate when they need personal space or quiet work time. I intend to incorporate all of this feedback into my work sample, and create an engaging learning experience for all 7th period learners. Differentiating Instruction: In my work sample, I will use Universal Design for Learning (UDL) strategies and other accommodations to ensure that my lesson content is accessible to all students. To prepare students for a Socratic seminar on standardized testing and for presenting their knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos through my Summative Assessment, I will expose students to a wide variety of texts and media to offer as many viewpoints and variations on persuasive writing as possible. The texts will be at varying levels of complexity, with some days offering multiple texts in a jigsaw format, to give ELL students and students with IEPs as many opportunities as possible to access course content. I will complement my text selections with videos, cartoons, and other media that will invite students to compare and contrast these formats, and decide which best utilizes Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos to support their claims. The
  42. 42. Gregory 42 differentiation in my text and media offerings is a UDL strategy, because it allows for multiple ways to access the same content; students who have difficulty with news articles may have better luck with a blog post, video, or other format that presents the same ideas through Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos. By bringing as many resources as possible into my instruction, I hope to foster the success of all learners. Furthermore, my text and media selections will come from authors who are representative of a wide range of races, gender identities, and other cultural experiences, in order to demonstrate that all voices can and should be invited into dialogue about high-stakes standardized testing. The students at Parkrose High School are incredibly diverse: PHS is a majority nonwhite school, with over 41 languages spoken by its students (Oregon Schools Database, 2014). To show my respect for all of these perspectives, I hope to bring in as many voices as possible that are representative of different races, genders, and cultural experiences that are all affected by standardized testing. By recognizing their own experiences within the diverse range of texts and media offered in my work sample unit, students will be supported in drawing connections to foster deeper learning. My exploration of high-stakes standardized testing is differentiated through author voice, in the hopes of establishing as many connections as possible between my students and their curriculum. To support students in accessing the main ideas in course texts, I will design several graphic organizers, Cornell Notes, and outlining tools. After the Pre-Assessment, students will start examining texts for Ethos, Pathos, and Logos using an Argument Retrieval Chart. Using an example text, I will help students to identify the central argument, and the ways that it uses Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos to support that argument. Then, students will have opportunities to jigsaw different texts and media to learn more about persuasive modes of writing within the context of the standardized testing debate. Students will also use an outlining tool for their Summative Assessment, or a paragraph describing and analyzing an author’s use of Ethos, Pathos, and/or Logos. This tool will be presented as a UDL strategy that all
  43. 43. Gregory 43 students may use, but accelerated learners are welcome to deviate from its structure to present the same content in a more innovative way. For students who may feel less confident in their writing abilities, including ELL students and students with IEPs, the outlining tool will help these students to present their ideas in a cogent and persuasive manner. Lastly, I will create predetermined roles for the Socratic seminars, around which students may choose to prepare notes if they need extra support in taking a stance in persuasive dialogue and organizing their ideas around it. While many students may feel comfortable identifying and supporting the claims offered by persuasive writing in their own Socratic dialogue, many students may feel underprepared for such an activity, or need extra support in articulating their ideas. To support these learners, I will provide students with predetermined roles in a Circle of Viewpoints activity the day before the seminar. The role sheets will offer a stance for students to defend, and students will practice defending that stance before the work sample unit. This organizational strategy will help students with developing literacies to access the main ideas of persuasive writing by providing the structure for it. Furthermore, this strategy will also challenge accelerated learners, by giving them a stance to defend, which may not necessarily be supported by their own ideas. These students will have to think beyond their own opinions, and conceptualize an argumentative stance other than their own. This will only strengthen their skills in persuasive writing and using Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, by requiring them to give mental energy to an opposing viewpoint; by understanding it better, they will be better prepared to defend their own ideas in the Socratic seminar and other learning contexts. Lastly, my work sample is differentiated to support Students JL and DS, who need accommodations in my lesson formats. Student JL has a vision impairment, and will benefit from using larger fonts on course texts, or digital devices that will allow him to adjust the font himself; I will provide both by making enlarged copies of readings, and by providing digital copies of texts that he may
  44. 44. Gregory 44 access on his school-issued iPad. Student DS falls behind on tasks that require handwritten completion, and benefits from digital accommodations; I will strive to create as many digital options as possible, so that DS can complete assignments on her school-issued iPad and keep pace with her classmates. The digital accommodations will also be available to all students in the class as optional variations on course content, to be completed on their school-issued iPads. These accommodations will help students develop skills in digital literacy and citizenship which will serve them well in 21st Century colleges and careers.
  45. 45. Gregory 45 LESSON ONE Instructors: Nerissa Ediza and Jordan Gregory Grade Level: 11th Grade Course: English III Unit: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Lesson Topic: Introduction to Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Time Allotted: 50 minutes UNIT ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do authors utilize Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to communicate their ideas about standardized testing? Curriculum Framing Questions:  What do students already know about Ethos, Pathos, and Logos?  How do Ethos, Pathos, and Logos differ from each other on a basic level?  How do Ethos, Pathos, and Logos connect to standardized testing? PREPARATION Purpose/Rationale: The purpose of this lesson plan is to assess students’ prior knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to inform future instruction, and to introduce students to these concepts through videos and class discussions. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson:  Students will be able to identify the basic differences between Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.  Students will evaluate their own knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos through a Pre-Assessment.  Students will have base definitions of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to develop further throughout the unit. Common Core State Standards:  W.11-12.6: “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.”  W.11-12.8: “Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.”  SL.11-12.1: “Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.”  L.11-12.3: “Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.”
  46. 46. Gregory 46 Prior Knowledge/Background Information: Before this unit, students must understand:  Writing as a medium by which authors may try to persuade their audiences. Materials/Resources Needed: For this unit, students will need:  Pencils  Graphic Organizers  iPads  Pre-Assessment Activity  Playing Cards  Projector PROCEDURES AND ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING Introduction: Student’s Actions Teacher’s Actions Resources Time As an introduction to this lesson, students will:  Complete a Pre-Assessment on a paper form, or through a Google Doc version. In this assessment, students will evaluate quotes, match terms, and analyze a political cartoon for its uses of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.  Differentiation: Enlarged print version for Student JL; digital accommodation for Student DS.  Differentiation: Accelerated learners may download Socrative: Student View on their iPads if they have time available after the Pre-Assessment. Socrative will be used more strongly in later lessons, but it is not essential to today’s learning tasks.  Consider today’s learning target: By the end of class, I will know the terms Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and understand how they work in persuasive writing. To introduce this lesson, instructors will:  Distribute Pre-Assessment, and explain how it connects to work sample unit.  Instruct students in how to download Socrative: Student View on their iPads, if they finish the Pre-Assessment early.  Present learning target on the projector: By the end of class, I will know the terms Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and understand how they work in persuasive writing.  Answer questions, as needed. Pencils iPads Pre- Assessment Activity 20m
  47. 47. Gregory 47 Body of Lesson: Student’s Actions Teacher’s Actions Resources Time For the body of this lesson, students will:  Complete a prewriting activity on page 179 of their notebooks on the following prompt: How do you persuade someone that you are right? Think of a time when you had to persuade someone, and describe how you convinced them that you were right.  Ask questions and summarize big ideas based on prewriting activity. Instructors will prompt students to write or type three words that come to mind when they think about persuasive writing, and the methods they described in their prewriting activity. Then, students will write one question they still have on persuasive writing. Consider: what didn’t work in your example from prewriting? What could you do better? Students may submit words and questions on paper.  Differentiation: Three words that characterize persuasive writing will help students to focus their thinking.  Differentiation: Digital accommodation for Student DS.  Submit three words on Socrative. Instructors will display words to support brief class discussion: students can look for similarities, differences, surprises, etc.  Differentiation: Socrative allows students to submit answers anonymously, which will support students who do not enjoy public speaking or who are anxious about evaluation to participate in the class. Students may also submit words and questions on paper.  Differentiation: Socrative results function as visual For the body of this lesson, instructors will:  Provide writing prompt: How do you persuade someone that you are right? Think of a time when you had to persuade someone, and describe how you convinced them you were right.  Prompt students to summarize their initial ideas with three words, and ask a question.  Answer questions, as needed.  Provide Socrative access code for students to submit three words on persuasive writing.  Display Socrative results, and prompt class discussion. Ask students to look for similarities, differences, surprises, etc.  Use class playing cards to call on students and generate discussion.  Co-Teaching: Team Teaching: Ms. Ediza and I will both point to similarities, differences, surprises, etc. that we observe in students’ responses. Both instructors will call on students Pencils Graphic Organizers iPads Projector Playing Cards 5m
  48. 48. Gregory 48 anchor to support learning.  Watch a brief video on Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and complete a graphic organizer that guides students through these concepts. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gf81d0YS58E  Follow instructions and prompts for graphic organizer. Instructors will pause video and check for understanding  Differentiation: Students who may have trouble following the video will have explicit instruction from Ms. Ediza and Mr. Gregory.  Discuss the video in table groups. Students will add their own examples of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and brainstorm one additional word that students can add to their initial list of three words. and ask clarifying questions.  Play video on Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and explain graphic organizer to students.  Pause video and prompt students to fill in sections of the graphic organizer with examples from the video, and their own ideas.  Facilitate table discussions. Ask students to share their examples of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, and brainstorm one new word to add to Socrative lists.  Answer questions on graphic organizer and Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, as needed. 10m 5m Closure/Extensions: Student’s Actions Teacher’s Actions Resources Time At the end of this lesson, students will:  Complete an exit slip using Socrative: Pairs of students will submit one question that their group had about persuasive writing.  Differentiation: Socrative results function as visual anchor to support learning. Students may look to their peers’ responses to inform their own contributions.  Differentiation: Students may submit digital or handwritten responses. At the end of this lesson, instructors will:  Provide exit slip on Socrative and assignment instructions. One student per table group will submit one additional word on persuasive writing from their earlier discussion, and one question that they had about persuasive writing. Pencils Paper iPads 10m
  49. 49. Gregory 49 LESSON REFLECTION In this lesson plan, I introduced the concepts of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, in a way that I hoped was constructivist, and built on students’ prior knowledge of persuasive techniques. Students spent some time journaling about a time when they had to persuade someone to adopt their viewpoint. Then, students reviewed their work and came up with three words about their persuasive technique that they would be willing to share with the class. Period 4 didn’t seem to understand my directions, so I worked to clarify these in Periods 6 and 7. Before the class wrote in the afternoon periods, I shared my own example of persuasive technique, and chose words like “emotion, relationships, compare” to show how I felt I was convincing my audience in my example. With a guide for this assignment, the quality of student work improved. In the future, I will need to clarify my instructions so that students know exactly what they need to do, and also add examples whenever possible. Overall, I felt that this lesson went smoothly, but there were a few issues that I can work on in future instruction. In Period 4, I tended to invite volunteers to share rather than call on random students, and so ended up having a conversation with only a few students. Ms. Ediza suggested that I use the playing cards with students’ names and photos after giving students plenty of think time; this acts as a system of accountability for students, but without being punitive or indicating that I am picking on select students. In future lessons, I will continue to work on these issues. Additionally, Ms. Ediza pointed out that it was unclear what students should be doing while I’m writing on the board, or once they’ve finished certain parts of the lesson. In one instance, I tried to engage a student in conversation around a lesson topic, and left other students without further instructions for their independent work. In future lessons, I will try to consider my position in the classroom, and ensure that all students are engaged in learning even when I am not directly working or communicating with them.
  50. 50. Gregory 50 NAME: ___________________________________________ PERIOD: ________________ ETHOS, PATHOS, LOGOS As you watch the video, use this organizer to keep track of what you’ve learned. Fill in the blanks. After the video, add your own examples of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in the spaces provided. ETHOS: _______________ character. Ethos is used when trying to persuade the audience that a character is a _______ person. Note: Ethos might also try to persuade you that a character/figure is an expert, or someone you should trust. VIDEO Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ YOUR Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ PATHOS: _______________. Pathos is a rhetorical device used to get readers to stop __________ and start ___________. VIDEO Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ YOUR Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ LOGOS: ________________. Think “logos” = “logic.” Logos persuades audiences using charts, graphs, and figures. Logos explains an argument in clear and concise terms. Logos provides concrete _________________ to support the author’s claims. VIDEO Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ YOUR Example: ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
  51. 51. Gregory 51 LESSON TWO Instructors: Nerissa Ediza and Jordan Gregory Grade Level: 11th Grade Course: English III Unit: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Lesson Topic: Deepening Understanding of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos Time Allotted: 50 minutes UNIT ESSENTIAL QUESTION: How do authors utilize Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to communicate their ideas about standardized testing? Curriculum Framing Questions:  How do Ethos, Pathos, and Logos differ from each other on a basic level?  How do Ethos, Pathos, and Logos connect to standardized testing? PREPARATION Purpose/Rationale: The purpose of this lesson plan is to expand students’ knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos from the previous lesson through reflective writing, discussion, and collaboration. Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson:  Students will be able to identify the basic differences between Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.  Students will evaluate their own knowledge of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos, as well as their own learning needs, through a Learner Profile Survey.  Students will have base definitions of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos to develop further throughout the unit. Common Core State Standards:  RI.11-12.6: “Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.”  RI.11-12.7: “Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.”  W.11-12.6: “Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.”
  52. 52. Gregory 52  W.11-12.8: “Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.”  SL.11-12.1: “Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.”  L.11-12.3: “Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.” Prior Knowledge/Background Information: Before this unit, students must understand:  Writing as a medium by which authors may try to persuade their audiences.  Familiarity with Ethos, Pathos, and Logos from the previous lesson. Materials/Resources Needed: For this unit, students will need:  Pencils  Graphic Organizers  iPads  Pre-Assessment Activity  Playing Cards  Projector PROCEDURES AND ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING Introduction: Student’s Actions Teacher’s Actions Resources Time As an introduction to this lesson, students will:  Consider the ad, announcement, or other resource left at their table groups. Then, students will reflect on their given media in a journal entry. Students must identify one mode of persuasive writing (Ethos, Pathos, Logos) that they think is present in the work, and explain how they see it in their piece. As an introduction to this unit, instructors will:  Provide ads, announcements, and other print media for students to consider at table groups.  Provide a journal prompt asking students to identify one mode of persuasive writing that is present in the piece. Pencils Paper Graphic Organizers 10m

Views

Total views

463

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

4

Actions

Downloads

7

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×