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Writing poetry with rhythm 
and rhyme
Learning Intention Success Criteria 
 To recall prior knowledge 
about rhythm and rhyme 
in poetry. 
 To understand and ...
Key Vocabulary 
 rhythm 
 rhyme 
 syllables
HOOK 
Betty Botter 
Betty Botter 
bought some butter. 
"But," she said, 
"the butter's bitter. 
If I put it 
in my batter,...
How good a tongue twister are 
you? 
 40 seconds and over: 
Too slow. Your grandparents could say the 
poem faster. 
 30...
 WHAT IS A LIMERICK? 
GKR 
What does 
the title tell 
me? 
What do I 
predict the 
text will be 
about? 
What do I 
alrea...
WHAT IS A LIMERICK? 
 Limericks are one of the most fun 
and well-known poetic forms. No 
one knows for sure where the 
n...
LIMERICK
THE RULES OF LIMERICKS 
 Limericks, like all poetic 
forms, have a set of rules 
that you need to follow. The 
rules for ...
Rhyming a limerick 
The rhyme scheme of a limerick is 
known as “AABBA.” 
This is because the last words in lines 
1, 2, a...
AABBA 
There was a young fellow named Hall 
Who fell in the spring in the fall. 
‘Twould have been a sad thing 
Had he die...
Limerick Rhythm 
Now let’s take a look at the rhythm of the 
limerick. 
What I want you to notice when you read 
or recite...
RHYTHM OF A LIMERICK 
da DUM da da DUM da da DUM 
da DUM da da DUM da da DUM 
da DUM da da DUM 
da DUM da da DUM 
da DUM d...
LIMERICK 
there WAS a young FELLow named HALL 
who FELL in the SPRING in the FALL. 
‘twould have BEEN a sad THING 
had he ...
Some limerick tricks 
There are two more things that you will 
notice when you read limericks: 
 the first line usually e...
Limerick 
There once was a man from New York 
 Then go to your rhyming dictionary 
and start looking for rhymes like 
“co...
Your Turn 
Now it’s your turn to see if you can write a 
limerick of your own. Remember to follow these 
steps: 
 Choose ...
Record what you 
now know about 
limericks. 
List three features 
of limericks 
List two of the 
limerick rules.
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Rhythm & Rhyme and Limerick

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Rhythm & Rhyme and Limerick

  1. 1. Writing poetry with rhythm and rhyme
  2. 2. Learning Intention Success Criteria  To recall prior knowledge about rhythm and rhyme in poetry.  To understand and follow the features and rules of limericks.  I understand the features of a limerick.  I can follow the rules for a limerick.  My limerick has rhythm and rhyme. What am I learning today?
  3. 3. Key Vocabulary  rhythm  rhyme  syllables
  4. 4. HOOK Betty Botter Betty Botter bought some butter. "But," she said, "the butter's bitter. If I put it in my batter, it will make my batter bitter. But a bit of better butter-- that would make my batter better.” So she bought a bit of butter, better than her bitter butter. And she put it in her batter, and the batter was not bitter. So 'twas better Betty Botter bought a bit of better butter! --By Anonymous
  5. 5. How good a tongue twister are you?  40 seconds and over: Too slow. Your grandparents could say the poem faster.  30 to 40 seconds: Not bad. You're probably a faster talker than the President.  20 to 30 seconds: Pretty good. You've been gifted with a fast pair of lips.  15 to 20 seconds: Excellent. You can out talk anyone around.  14 seconds or less: You are a tongue tying champion!
  6. 6.  WHAT IS A LIMERICK? GKR What does the title tell me? What do I predict the text will be about? What do I already know about this topic? What can the pictures tell me? What words do I expect to see? What images come to mind? What will I do as I read? Record what you know about Limericks. Don’t forget to use your prior knowledge about poetry, rhythm and rhyme.
  7. 7. WHAT IS A LIMERICK?  Limericks are one of the most fun and well-known poetic forms. No one knows for sure where the name “limerick” comes from, but most people assume it is related to the county of Limerick, in Ireland.  The reason limericks are so much fun is because they are short, rhyming, funny, and have a bouncy rhythm that makes them easy to memorize. In this lesson, I’ll show you how you can write your own limericks in just a few easy steps. GKR What does the title tell me? What do I predict the text will be about? What do I already know about this topic? What can the pictures tell me? What words do I expect to see? What images come to mind? What will I do as I read?
  8. 8. LIMERICK
  9. 9. THE RULES OF LIMERICKS  Limericks, like all poetic forms, have a set of rules that you need to follow. The rules for a limerick are fairly simple:  They are five lines long.  Lines 1, 2, and 5 rhyme Limerick with one another.  Lines 3 and 4 rhyme with each other.  They have a distinctive rhythm (which I’ll explain shortly)  They are usually funny.
  10. 10. Rhyming a limerick The rhyme scheme of a limerick is known as “AABBA.” This is because the last words in lines 1, 2, and 5 rhyme. Those are the “A’s” in the rhyme scheme. The “B’s” are the last words of lines 3 and 4. Let me give you an example …
  11. 11. AABBA There was a young fellow named Hall Who fell in the spring in the fall. ‘Twould have been a sad thing Had he died in the spring, But he didn’t—he died in the fall. – Anonymous
  12. 12. Limerick Rhythm Now let’s take a look at the rhythm of the limerick. What I want you to notice when you read or recite a limerick is that the first two lines and the last line have three “beats” in them, while the third and fourth lines have two “beats.” In other words, the rhythm of a limerick looks like this …
  13. 13. RHYTHM OF A LIMERICK da DUM da da DUM da da DUM da DUM da da DUM da da DUM da DUM da da DUM da DUM da da DUM da DUM da da DUM da da DUM
  14. 14. LIMERICK there WAS a young FELLow named HALL who FELL in the SPRING in the FALL. ‘twould have BEEN a sad THING had he DIED in the SPRING, but he DIDn’t—he DIED in the FALL.
  15. 15. Some limerick tricks There are two more things that you will notice when you read limericks:  the first line usually ends with a person’s first name or the name of a place  the last line is usually funny  because the first line is usually the name of a person or place, writing the first line is the easiest part. You simply pick the name of a place or person – like “New York” or “Dave” – and write a line like this …
  16. 16. Limerick There once was a man from New York  Then go to your rhyming dictionary and start looking for rhymes like “cork,” “fork,” “pork,” “stork,” or “cave,” “gave,” “wave,” and so on to find more words to complete your limerick.
  17. 17. Your Turn Now it’s your turn to see if you can write a limerick of your own. Remember to follow these steps:  Choose the name of a person or place and write the first line.  Look in a rhyming dictionary for words that rhyme with your person or place name.  Write line 2 and 5 to rhyme with the first line.  Now write lines 3 and 4 with a different rhyme.  When you are done writing, read your limerick out loud to see if it has the right rhythm; three “beats” on lines 1, 2, and 5, and two “beats” on lines 3 and 4, as shown above. If not, see if you can rewrite some words to get the rhythm right.
  18. 18. Record what you now know about limericks. List three features of limericks List two of the limerick rules.

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