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DoH Oct09 WMids SHA

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DoH Oct09 WMids SHA

  1. 1. NHS West Midlands • Media coverage, October 2009 Date: 24th November 2009 Prepared for: Helen Jackson, Steve Coneys Client Service Team: Richard Ingles, Diana Shepherd, Morgan Mahoney and Sophie Hill
  2. 2. 2 Contents • Introduction 3 • Executive Summary 4 • Topline Information 5 • Detailed Analysis 11 • Media and Journalists 18 • Appendix: Methodology 22
  3. 3. 3 Introduction • This analysis is based on 1,840 articles, which were supplied to Precis via Durrants and the West Midlands SHA. Some of the charts focus only on the regional media, comprising of 1,664 articles. • The analysis was based on a framework of codes which was set up with input from the initial COI brief and further discussion with the Department of Health. • A four-point favourability scale was used, ranging from Very Positive to Very Negative. • Coverage was analysed according to Precis’ Media Influence Index, which assigns an impact score of between one and 100 to each item, based on various factors such as audience, size and prominence. A detailed explanation is included in the Appendix (page 23).
  4. 4. 4 Executive Summary Topline information • Article count in October decreased, falling from 1,890 to 1,840 articles. The total reach declined from 54.5m to 37.7m. The level of positive and very positive impact rose to 75.9% after a month at 63.8%. Only two articles contained very negative comments, which was in connection with Stafford General. • South Staffordshire continued to lead within PCT coverage, and its proportion of criticism was down on last month (38% compared to 53% in September). Positive news included the announcement of extended visiting hours at Staffordshire General Hospital, which have been “welcomed by campaigners who want to see greater access for relatives outside of normal visiting hours” (Express & Star – various editions). • Dudley was again prominent this month and discussion was more positive than negative. A series of free workshops for parents of children with learning difficulties in Dudley and a new therapy service to help patients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder helped to boost upbeat comment (Kidderminster Express & Star). Detailed analysis: issues • Corporate issues remained ahead in October, despite a further decrease in article count (979 this month down from 1,017 in September and 1,055 in August). There was less Service coverage compared with Corporate, and similarly volumes were down month-on-month (797 this month and 861 in September). • The leading topic for Service delivery was Facilities, buildings, which was predominantly favourable in tone, fuelled by news that “a unique child-friendly area has been unveiled at Nuneaton’s George Eliot Hospital” (Heartland Evening News - Nuneaton). • Strategy/planning led within Corporate coverage, and plans for an £11 million health centre, “which promises to transform NHS care” (The Sentinel – Stoke-on-Trent) contributed to favourable commentary. Messages • Caring organisation was the most prominent message, and there were positive message mentions in 67% of the coverage. Stories contributing to Caring Organisation included promising actual incident figures at Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital: “Numbers are believed to be low and 80.4% of those which occurred resulted in no harm, a far better percentage than the national average for all acute hospitals” (Shropshire Star – Last Edition). Commentators • Providers continued to dominate within internal comment in October, and experienced a significant increase in their share of voice (67.9% up from 53.8% in September). Political figures dominated amongst external stakeholders and negative impact outweighed positive. Dudley North MP Ian Austin spoke out about substandard cleanliness at the Dudley Group of Hospitals: “It’s really important that issues like these are dealt with so that every patient gets the very best treatment available” (Kidderminster Express & Star). Media • The Express & Star series was again the key media, and the First edition had the highest volume with 107 articles. The Shrophire Star (Last Edition) published the greatest amount of criticism, with 34 of its 74 items containing negative commentary. • Alison Dayani was the leading journalist in October, writing in the Birmingham Mail, Birmingham Post, Birmingham Sunday Mercury and Black Country Mail.
  5. 5. 5 Topline information
  6. 6. 6 Key performance indicators The favourability index shows the balance of positive and negative impact. A figure above the zero line means positive impact outweighs negative, while a figure below the zero line means there is more negative than positive impact. All coverage Regional media only Number of articles 1,840 1,664 Total reach (gross, includes national & regional media) 37.7m National 28.4m Regional 4.3m Percentage by tone Very positive 0.3% 0.3% Positive 73.3% 75.6% Negative 26.0% 24.0% Very negative 0.4% 0.1% % with message (positive) 67% Leading issue Strategy, planning Leading publication by volume Express & Star - First October 2009
  7. 7. 7 What was the profile of NHS West Midlands? The NHS in the West Midlands was mentioned in 1,664 regional media items in October (down from 1,723 in September). The level of positive and very positive impact rose to 75.9% after a month at 63.8%. Impact levels within regional media remained stable month-on-month. Very negative and negative coverage in all media decreased to their lowest levels since February.
  8. 8. 8 How did the various PCTs and Trusts perform in the media? South Staffordshire headed PCT coverage and commentary included a wide range of stories. News of extended visiting hours at Staffordshire General Hospital, and particularly initiations for relatives to visit patients during mealtimes, have been “welcomed by campaigners who want to see greater access for relatives outside of normal visiting hours” (Express & Star – various editions). Meanwhile, the release of Peter Garland’s “secret report” into the conduct of Martin Yeates under the Freedom of Information Act fuelled criticism for the PCT as talk of the scandals resurfaced (Express & Star – various editions). Dudley was also prominent this month and discussion was more positive than negative. A series of free workshops for parents of children with learning difficulties in Dudley and a new therapy service to help patients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder helped to boost upbeat comment (Kidderminster Express & Star). However, poor ratings from the Quality Care Commission on a number of different areas increased negative reporting for the PCT (Halesowen Chronicle, among others).
  9. 9. 9 How did the various organisations perform in the media? •“A cookery demonstration for women undergoing breast cancer treatment is part of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Ladan Hajihassani, Worcestershire Royal Hospital’s dietician, will also be present to answer specific questions on nutrition” (Worcester News). •“University Hospital Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust … received good ratings for both quality of services and quality of financial managing [from the Care Quality Commission]” (Coventry Observer). •“Poorly people can simply walk into a flagship GP health centre to see a doctor even if they are registered to another surgery. That is one of the benefits of the brand new Camp Hill Healthcare Centre in Nuneaton” (Heartland Evening News - Nuneaton). •“Results of a national survey of people’s experiences revealed that patients across South Staffordshire and Shropshire were generally satisfied with the South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust” (Uttoxeter Advertiser). •“A secret report obtained by the Express & Star … sheds new light on the scandal at Stafford Hospital and the role of former hospital boss Martin Yeates” (Express & Star – print and online). •“The University Hospital of North Staffordshire £40 million maternity complex was singled out for praise at the Labour Party conference in Brighton. Speaking in front of Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Stoke-on-Trent city councillor Mark Davis described the maternity centre as ‘magnificent’” (Leek & Post Times).
  10. 10. 10 How did the various organisations perform in the media? •“Kindhearted staff from The Dudley Group of Hospitals have been rewarded for going the extra mile and making a real difference to patient care. More than 210 workers from the Trust attended the celebratory Committed to Excellence event at The Copthorne Hotel, which was hosted by comedian and practicing GP Dr Phil Hammond” (Dudley News). •“The Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS FT was deemed to be among the worst in the country. It was rated weak for its overall quality of services to patients after failing to meet targets for waiting times by NHS regulator the Care Quality Commission” (Express & Star – various editions). •“The Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals Trust deserves credit for maintaining its excellent rating, as does Sandwell and West Birmingham, which is described as good [by the Care Quality Commission]” (Express & Star – various editions).
  11. 11. 11 Detailed analysis
  12. 12. 12 What did the coverage focus on? Corporate issues dominated again in October, despite a further decrease in article count (979 this month down from 1,017 in September and 1,055 in August). There was less Service coverage compared with Corporate, and similarly volumes were down month-on-month (797 this month and 861 in September). Coverage of Corporate issues was largely favourable, as 66.8% of impact was positive or very positive, and for Service delivery this was 62.4%. More detail on Service and Corporate topics is available on the next two pages.
  13. 13. 13 What did the articles talk about? “There were 129 on-the-day operation cancellations in the first quarter of 2009-2010 at the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust - more than double those for the same period in 2005- 2006” (Staffordshire Newsletter - Stafford). “A unique child-friendly area has been unveiled at Nuneaton’s George Eliot Hospital. TV’s John Craven did the honours yesterday, cutting the ribbon on the facility which will ensure young patients are separated from their adult counterparts” (Heartland Evening News - Nuneaton). “Gordon Brown and David Cameron united to praise the care provided to British troops at Selly Oak Hospital in Birmingham … [Gordon Brown] praised the remarkable treatment at Selly Oak … and at Headley Court in Surrey, which provides rehabilitative care, such as physiotherapy” (Birmingham Mail).
  14. 14. 14 What did the articles talk about? “More than 300 people packed a meeting to voice their anger at moves which could lead to a downgrading of Telford’s Princess Royal Hospital with key services moved to Shrewsbury” (Shropshire Star – Last Edition). “Warwick Hospital chiefs say they are well on course to clear their once crippling debts” (Leamington Spa Observer). “Plans for an £11 million health centre which promises to transform NHS care in a community have been unveiled … If approved, the centre will bring seven GP practices together and a range of health services, including physiotherapy and district nursing” (The Sentinel – Stoke-on-Trent).
  15. 15. 15 Which messages came through for NHS West Midlands? “Sick youngsters could be sent from Birmingham to Leicester for treatment because the city’s Children’s Hospital is struggling to cope with a lack of beds” (Birmingham Mail). “Although actual incident figures were not available from the Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital Trust … numbers are believed to be low and 80.4% of those which occurred resulted in no harm, a far better percentage than the national average for all acute hospitals” (Shropshire Star – Last Edition). “Twenty nursing officials at the University Hospital of North Staffordshire wore purple uniforms … so they could stand out to patients. They will repeat the colourful spectacle every Friday as part of an initiative for the bosses to keep an eye on things at ward level … the distinctive uniforms were added yesterday so patients can easily pick them out if they need to raise any grievances” (The Sentinel – Stoke-on-Trent).
  16. 16. 16 How influential were the SHA’s representatives? Providers remained prominent within internal comment in October, and experienced a significant increase in their share of voice (67.9% up from 53.8% in September). PCTs saw a considerable drop in their share, falling from 41.9% to 24.8%. The leading group continued to be Managers, as those from Trusts/Hospitals had 56.5% of impact while the PCTs had 24.2%. Political figures dominated amongst external stakeholders, as Patients, members of public rose from third to second place.
  17. 17. 17 And which were the most favourable? Positive comment from Providers included Dr Sam Ramaiah, Director of Public Health for NHS Walsall who praised the acknowledgement of progress made by NHS staff working on the Fun4Life initiative: “Childhood obesity is a major public health problem with one-in-four children being obese or overweight. Fun4Life is a proven programme to tackle obesity and I am delighted colleagues from Walsall have won the award” (Express & Star - Sandwell). Elsewhere, boosting positive impact for PCTs, Laurence Tressier, NHS Coventry’s Deputy Head of medicines management, commented on the success of the Got a Cough campaign: “We’re delighted all 84 pharmacies in the city took part in this campaign, resulting in many patients getting earlier diagnosis and treatment” (Coventry Observer). Commentary from Political figures was more negative than positive. Dudley North MP Ian Austin approached the Chief Executive of the Dudley Group of Hospitals following official reports of sub-standard clenliness. He explained: “It’s really important that issues like these are dealt with so that every patient gets the very best treatment available and we have to take it very seriously when standards slip” (Kidderminster Express & Star).
  18. 18. 18 Media and journalists
  19. 19. 19 Which media gave the most attention to NHS West Midlands? “There are more than 60 vacancies for cleaners at Dudley’s Russells Hall Hospital, union officials have claimed. They called for the positions to be filled as a matter of urgency in the wake of a report which condemned hygiene standards”. “A walk-in health clinic is to open in Hereford in December to serve patients seven days a week, with the opening hours aimed at workers”. “Toddlers have enjoyed a special visit from paramedics as part of a lesson on who takes care of them in times of need. Representatives from West Midlands Ambulance Service went to see youngsters and their parents at the Little Monkeys parents and toddlers group .... Children got to wear mock bandages, sit in an ambulance, and learn about flashing lights and sirens”.
  20. 20. 20 And which journalists should the organisation be talking to? “Pupils from a Birmingham school are … picking acorns from hospital grounds and germinating their own trees … at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, in Northfield, to the delight of doctors and nurses” (Birmingham Mail). “NHS managers planning to downgrade maternity services in Solihull have been told they must rethink after failing to factor in the borough’s population growth in coming years” (Birmingham Post). “The Dudley Group of Hospitals NHS FT was deemed to be among the worst in the country. It was rated weak for its overall quality of services to patients after failing to meet targets for waiting times by NHS regulator the Care Quality Commission” (Express & Star – various editions).
  21. 21. 21 How did individual journalists describe the NHS West Midlands? “South Warwickshire General Hospitals looks set to become the first NHS trust in Coventry and Warwickshire to win the coveted FT status. This will give the trust … more control to tailor its services to local patients’ needs and a board of elected governors who will hold hospital chiefs to account” (Coventry Telegraph). “A new £1.8 million mobile intensive care service to move desperately-ill children if a critical care bed is not available has been launched … to help save more young lives … It has been made possible by £1.8 million funding from PCTs across the West Midlands” (Birmingham Mail). “Eye treatment in Birmingham has picked up a national excellence award for exceptional care of patients with a devastating illness that causes blindness” (Birmingham Mail).
  22. 22. 22 Appendix
  23. 23. 23 • The system used for this analysis uses a composite impact measure, termed the "Media Influence Index". A description of this measure is provided below. THE MEDIA INFLUENCE INDEX • Precis is a computerised method of evaluating the impact of coverage of selected material on a given target audience. This material may relate to competitors, competitors' products, key messages, market issues or any other topic of interest. The Media Influence Index is a sophisticated, comprehensive measure which encompasses all the factors which contribute to the likelihood of the target audience assimilating coverage analysed. • Using information from articles fed into the system, it is possible to produce reports showing the physical impact of the material on the selected target. This is done by using an algorithm which produces an impact measure based on a variety of factors which have a role to play in determining impact. These are as follows: • The circulation of each publication • an article in a high-circulation title will have more impact than one in a smaller title • Percentage of the page occupied by the article • a large article will have more impact than a small article • Percentage of the page occupied by a photograph • an article with a photograph will have a higher impact score than one without • The columnar spread of the article • an article with a large headline will have a higher impact than one with a smaller headline • The position of the article on the page • an article in the upper-right of the page is more likely to be read than an article elsewhere • The location of the page (front, back, etc.) • a front or back-page article will have a higher impact than an article within a publication • Each cutting is attributed an impact value of between 1 and 100, based on the above parameters, thereby providing a composite measure of impact. For each period, these individual impact scores are cumulated, thereby giving an effective measure of the overall amount of “noise” on the issues, products or companies analysed during the period. Week-by-week comparisons then permit trends to be identified. THE FAVOURABILITY INDEX • Data can also be displayed in a simpler way by netting out the amount of positive and negative impact achieved by each organisation which is being tracked. Positive impact is multiplied by 5 and negative by -5, then they are added together. If positive impact outweighs negative, the overall favourability index will be above zero, and if negative impact is dominant, the overall favourability index will be less than zero. Methodology

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