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Spain: Retain final conference

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Presentation from the Retain final conference

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Spain: Retain final conference

  1. 1. FINAL CONFERENCE Brussels 21st April 2016 The RETAIN Project is supported by The Lifelong Learning Programme
  2. 2. OUTLINE 1. Procedure - school selection & characteristics 2. Diagnostic phase - work-related stress 3. Intervention tools - Shared Vision & World Café 4. Good practice - a case study Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  3. 3. 1. PROCEDURE: SCHOOL SELECTION ➢ There was a public contest for the participation of schools in Catalonia in the project. ➢ A letter was sent in which the main lines of work of the RETAIN project were explained. ➢ From the responses, five government-subsidised private schools were finally selected. These schools are in the provinces of Barcelona, Tarragona and Girona, in Catalonia . Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  4. 4. 1. PROCEDURE: SCHOOL SELECTION ➢ The main selection criteria were: 1. sample project requirements were fulfilled; 2. that during the duration of the project, schools could not be involved in other processes of change or in the development of other projects; 3. schools should have novice teachers. ➢ In each organization, work has been carried out with three different groups: management teams, senior teachers and novice teachers. Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  5. 5. AN IMPORTANT ASPECT OF PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS IN CATALONIA In the schools we visited, there appears to be no brain drain with teachers leaving their posts. Teacher remain for reasons of vocation and job security. Nevertheless, teaching staff are unmotivated, appear stressed, and this ultimately hinders the development of new talent. Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  6. 6. SCHOOLS Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  7. 7. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SCHOOLS Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  8. 8. 2. DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK-RELATED STRESS 1. Ambiguity and role conflict: a) new functions b) diversity c) limits to the teacher’s role d) the use of ICT DIFFICULTIES RELATED TO TEACHING DIFFICULTIES RELATED TO ORGANIZATION (organizational context) 1. Perception of low participation 2. Poor communication 3. Lack of recognition 4. Strategic planning deficit Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  9. 9. DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK- RELATED STRESS 1. Role ambiguity: What is the scope of the teaching role: a) new functions such as handling family conflicts (dysfunctional families) for which teachers do not feel trained. Is such work the teacher’s responsibility? TEACHING TASK Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  10. 10. b) Another source of role ambiguity was found in some of the centers, for reasons arising from the diversity teachers have to cope with and the lack of training / information they perceive they have. TEACHING TASK Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK- RELATED STRESS
  11. 11. c) limits or boundaries of the teacher’s role: • receiving mail from parents, the school, at weekends, and not knowing whether to answer or not. • urgent demands for a quick response from message senders that come during non-contact hours and interfere with teachers’ work-life balance. Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 TEACHING TASK DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK- RELATED STRESS
  12. 12. Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 TEACHING TASK d) ICT DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK- RELATED STRESS
  13. 13. Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 DIFFICULTIES RELATED TO ORGANIZATION (organizational context) DIAGNOSTIC PHASE: FACTORS THAT LEAD TO WORK- RELATED STRESS 1. Perception of low participation 2. Poor communication 3. Lack of recognition 4. Strategic planning deficit
  14. 14. affects DIAGNOSTIC CONCLUSIONS Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016
  15. 15. 3. INTERVENTION TOOLS Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 VISION The purpose of this tool is to provide an overview of the values that make up the vision, purpose and project organization. The term ‘vision’ is used for an intervention in which the group members or organization, develop and describe their vision of what they want the organization to be in the future.
  16. 16. INTERVENTION TOOLS Final Conference Brussels 21 April 2016 WORLD CAFÉ World Café is a methodology that enables the generation of informal conversation networks and social learning. It promotes dialogue and the exchange of experiences among a large number of people on relevant issues within an organization. The spirit of this process is to enable the generation of new ideas, proposals, agreements and plans for creative and innovative action.
  17. 17. The kind of activities we have implemented... SHARED VISION: Teachers Team WORLD CAFÉ: Teachers Team SHARED VISION: Improvement Projects SHARED VISION: Organizational project SHARED VISION: Teacher’s Role
  18. 18. ...and the people who have taken part in the activities Teachers team. Primary School. 40 people The whole school. Primary and secondary teachers & managers. 50 people Teachers team. Primary school. 40 people The whole school. Primary teachers & managers team. 25 people
  19. 19. The Shared Vision tool has allowed us to: 1. jointly explore issues of concern to the vast majority of teacher teams and management teams. 2. show that participants have ideas, beliefs and visions which are often shared, and which have not been reported before. This has encouraged a climate of cooperation and trust. 3. share ideas, allowing for the emergence of collective intelligence, beyond individual talents. RESULTS - IMPACT
  20. 20. RESULTS - IMPACT 4. achieve a significant impact over a short period of time (Nausicaa & Vedruna) 5. provide a space for dialogue and guided reflection, which serves as a starting point to begin working in a more cooperative way 6. obtain higher levels of satisfaction as participants perceive themselves as part of a project, in which they are active agents.
  21. 21. 4. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY Semi-private secular school. Located in the centre of Barcelona. It's a small school. The management team, consisting of three women, is a recent addition. The previous management used to work in a much more hierarchical way when issuing guidelines, and the current management team wants to change this culture. They want to introduce a more participative style of management, in which the whole staff is involved in the formulation of goals and the achievement of results THE SCHOOL
  22. 22. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY DIAGNOSTIC EVIDENCE After the diagnostic phase, we noticed the lack of a common vision for the school. The lack of a clear vision is a source of unease and concern for the management team, who also transmit this to the teaching staff, through a lack of clear guidelines and a sense of disorientation. All this creates stress, lack of motivation and not knowing where to focus energy. In short, this results in a serious inability to develop teachers’ talents.
  23. 23. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY PROCEDURE Dec 2014 • Management Team (MT) meeting to give feedback on the diagnosis • MT Meeting to explain the VISION tool and other tools in the Retain Toolbox May 2015 • MT Meeting to work out the details of the Intervention • Intervention June 2015 • Analysis of results of intervention • MT meeting to monitor the action plan they have drawn up from this first intervention with the Vision Tool
  24. 24. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY IMPACT: PROMOTING FACTORS Intervention with the VISION tool has: ✓ provided the school with a starting point to be able to define itself and to adopt a more cooperative approach ✓ led to the generation of enthusiasm and motivation to build the future of the school ✓ created a shared vision from different personal points of view. As the management team points out, this has had a satisfactory effect, since all teachers felt they were listened to, valued and were part of the same project.
  25. 25. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY NEXT STEPS Detailed analysis obtained by the management team resulting from the data from both their joint work and the development of action plans to move forward: 1. appraisal interview - headteacher with each of the team members 1. satisfaction surveys 1. working committees 1. different types of meetings in order to bring teachers from different stages together.
  26. 26. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY SOCIAL IMPACT HELEN…Insertar comentarios en notas
  27. 27. GOOD PRACTICE: CASE STUDY TEAM MANAGEMENT VIDEO NAUSICA
  28. 28. CARMELITAS

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