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LASSN volunteer training – the asylum journey April 2016

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The Asylum Journey - Training for Volunteers - Revised and updated April 2016

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LASSN volunteer training – the asylum journey April 2016

  1. 1. LASSN volunteer training – The Asylum Journey APRIL 2016 Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  2. 2. Introductions ◦ Your name ◦ What you are volunteering for ◦ How did you hear about LASSN? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  3. 3. Outcomes By the end of this session we hope you will ◦Understand the differences between a refugee, an asylum seeker, and other migrants ◦Understand why people seek asylum ◦Have an overview of the UK asylum system ◦Have had chance to ask questions and broaden your understanding Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  4. 4. Housekeeping & Groundrules Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  5. 5. Where does LASSN fit with other agencies in Leeds? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  6. 6. What do the media say about asylum seekers & refugees? ◦ Talk to your neighbour for 2 minutes about the way asylum seekers and refugees are talked about in the UK media Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  7. 7. What does LASSN say about asylum seekers & refugees? ◦ Many people are misinformed about issues around asylum and refuge ◦ When people know more about the reality of seeking refuge or asylum they are often ◦ Generous ◦ Supportive ◦ Sympathetic Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  8. 8. What do the tabloids say about asylum seekers & refugees? ◦ Talk to your neighbour for 2 minutes about the popular perception of asylum in the UK Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  9. 9. Who is a refugee? A refugee is a person who has fled their country due to a well founded fear of persecution for reasons of ◦Race ◦Religion ◦Nationality ◦Membership of a particular social group ◦Or political opinion and cannot rely on the protection of that Country Article 1 The 1951 Convention Relating to the status of Refugees Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  10. 10. Who is an asylum seeker? ◦ Someone who has fled their own country, arrived in another, and has asked for the protection of that Country, due to a well founded fear of persecution. ◦ “Asylum Seeker” is the legal term for someone who is asking for protection, but whose right to protection has not yet been established. ◦ “Claiming Asylum” describes the legal process of asking for protection. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  11. 11. Turn to your booklet page 1 ◦ Please just look at the first page, and don’t turn over… (yet) ◦ Have a think about the kinds of experiences your person may have experienced that has forced them to flee ◦ Write down your thoughts Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  12. 12. Where do refugees come from? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  13. 13. Exercise: preparing to go You have decided you need to flee your country. Which items do you take with you? You can only choose 5. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  14. 14. Exercise: taking a journey The Syrian Journey: choose your own escape route Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  15. 15. Where do refugees go? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  16. 16. Turn to your booklet page 2 Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  17. 17. Migration into the UK (2015) Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  18. 18. Asylum applications to the UK Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  19. 19. Definitions Asylum Seeker – fleeing persecution and has arrived in another country to claim asylum. Refused asylum seeker – asylum claim refused (many variations). Refugee – asylum claim successful, given the right to remain in the country, work etc. Economic Migrant – has ‘chosen’ to travel to another country to take up or seek employment. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  20. 20. What are the chances of success? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  21. 21. And what if you appeal? Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  22. 22. The Asylum Process Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network 1. Application for Asylum 2. Basic Screening interview 3. Home Office Case owner assigned 4. Moved to Initial Accommodation 5. Substantive interview at Home office or 7. Decision on claim (target = 30 days) 8a. Claim accepted, 5 years Leave to Remain 8b. Claim refused, 28 days to lodge an appeal 6a. Dispersed 6b. Detained Eligible for legal aid funded advice (but solicitor not funded to attend interview) Eligible for Section 95 support – housing, utilities and weekly cash. Must sign at Home Office regularly.
  23. 23. Asylum Support Home Office ‘Section 95’ support oaccommodation (bills included) oweekly cash support - £36.95 for each person in the household (reduced August 2015) Home Office ‘Section 4’ support ofor refused asylum seekers (“vulnerable” or unable to return) o£35.39 per person on a payment card Local authority supports ‘unaccompanied minors’ Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  24. 24. Turn to your booklet page 3 Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  25. 25. Detention All asylum seeking adults and families are “Liable to be detained” No statutory limit to length of immigration detention. The decision to detain is made by an immigration officer or a Home Office case owner, it is not automatically subject to independent review at any stage. The coalition government committed to ending the detention of children. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  26. 26. Appeals process Application is refused Appeal (within 10 days) Appeal refused Judicial review Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network Limbo Deportation/ Voluntary Return Refugee Status/ leave to remain
  27. 27. Turn to your booklet page 4 Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  28. 28. Further information o Section 4 – for those at the end of the legal process or Judicial Review or Fresh Claim submitted. Illness, pregnancy or young children. Housing plus limited financial support. o Destitution – Can happen at any stage, but most likely at end of legal process. Support from friends, family, charities. o Healthcare – Asylum seekers get free primary health care (GP, Family planning), hospital and secondary services are chargeable. Refugees same as UK residents. o Legal advice – solicitors (paid and Legal Aid), charities, advisors. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  29. 29. Section 4 Support Housing, utilities and (less) weekly cash on an ‘Azure card’ 1.Taking all reasonable steps to leave the UK 2.Unable to leave the UK - medical reason 3.Unable to leave the UK - is no viable route of return 4.Have made an application for judicial review. 5.Require support in order to avoid a breach of a person’s rights under the European Convention on Human Rights, e.g. submitted a fresh claim Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  30. 30. Destitution When does this happen? ◦Refugees if bad transition between systems ◦Refused asylum seekers ◦Stateless people – no country will accept them UK Government policy seems to encourage destitution – creating “an extremely hostile environment” Can take the form of: ◦Street homelessness ◦‘Sofa surfing’ ◦Charity housing Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  31. 31. Access to healthcare Refugee - all health care, same as any other resident. Asylum seekers, refused asylum seekers appealing/on section 4, trafficked people ◦ Free GP primary care (inc. mental health), free hospital treatment ◦ Free prescriptions Refused Asylum Seeker ◦ treatment already underway is completed free of charge ◦ free prescriptions Free services to all ◦ A&E, Family planning, treatment for certain communicable diseases, (TB, Measles), Treatment for STIs; HIV/AIDS treatment; compulsory mental health treatment Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  32. 32. Legal Advice Asylum seekers are entitled to FREE legal representation from: ◦A solicitor, or ◦An adviser who is Office of the Immigration Services Commissioner (OISC) registered (usually through a charity). BUT Legal Aid is now very limited. Do NOT give legal advice if you are not OISC registered, it’s illegal. Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  33. 33. Any Questions? See also the lassn.org.uk/qa Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network
  34. 34. Useful sources of information unhcr.org - Global refugeecouncil.org.uk - National migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk – National/Regional www.migrationyorkshire.org.uk - Regional/Local lassn.org.uk Leeds Asylum Seekers’ Support Network

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