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Designing for customers and the future—Case Study: NSW Department of Education (Relate Live Sydney)

Peter Buckmaster, Director, Digital Services, Communication and Engagement Directorate

Organisations have always been challenged by changes in customer behaviour and preferences. But today, more than ever, technology is radically changing how companies and customers communicate. Our physical and digital methods of communication are increasingly intertwined, and there is a greater need for omnichannel brand outreach. And even when a brand wants to keep up, the resources and investment may not be there.

There is hope—human-centered service design. By designing consistent and integrated customer experiences now, organisations can better understand where customer behaviours will be in the future.

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Designing for customers and the future—Case Study: NSW Department of Education (Relate Live Sydney)

  1. 1. #RelateLive
  2. 2. Peter Buckmaster NSW, Department of Education Director, Digital Services PeterBuckmaster peterbuckmaster.com
  3. 3. Designing for customers and the future human-centered service design
  4. 4. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN • Human Centred Design is 100 years old • But it's taken 80 years to recognise it • An early example is IBM's preto-type for speech to text PRETO-TYPE Early example is IBM's preto-type for speech to text. A typist sat hidden as participants dictated to a shell of a computer making the machine appear to type text. IBM discovered they were not just testing an interface and a human's ability to interact with the interface. Results were that the output was not grammatically correct or structured. PRETO-TYPE Early example is IBM's preto-type for speech to text. A typist sat hidden as participants dictated to a shell of a computer making the machine appear to type text. IBM discovered they were not just testing an interface and a human's ability to interact with the interface. Results were that the output was not grammatically correct or structured.
  5. 5. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN • User Centred Design has been present in design for key events... • Tank warfare (WWI) • Space race (1960’s) • Dotcom was our space race… “Many of the ideas developed during the period are just being realised.” • What makes UCD different is the study of humans in context, first to investigate and then to validate. 
  6. 6. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN The evolution of design is based on: • field studies/observations, • evolution of technology • concept design • prototyping • release • continuous improvement.
  7. 7. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN • To understand the importance of good User Experience Design we only need to see bad design.
  8. 8. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN “It’s taken me two years to realize that there was a headphone connector hidden below the monitor of this machine. All the time I was think that it was bluetooth…”
  9. 9. PRELUDE - USER CENTRED DESIGN Yet good design often goes unnoticed My mag connector on my apple mac air
  10. 10. Phygital • Nicholas Negroponte’s 1995 book Being Digital, tells of life in the future, a digital age at a time when the world was analogue. • We talk about digital first but our citizen or customers are past this.
  11. 11. Phygital • User experience evolves continuous. • In the beginning of the internet we dialed up… limited download speed and access. • Broadband moved us into always on/connected • With mobile internet and wireless we’re no longer constrained to a desktop but are mobile. • We’ve moved beyond physical and digital spaces into phygital.
  12. 12. Service Design • Service design is the idea that all business processes and customer interactions are designed to fulfil customer goals across all channels from face-to-face to digital. • Service Design Delivers on Phygital • The objective is to present an even experience across all channels. • A sign of success is a customer’s ability to start an interaction in one channel and move to another, seamlessly - aka Omnichannel. • EXAMPLE: Service NSW or Medicare use of a concierge directing/assisting people to resolve their problem. • Directing you to agent or a self-service kiosk or PC
  13. 13. Design Thinking Design Thinking sees a shift from analytical thinking to creating thinking. It looks at a problem and solving the problem through broad idea generation DISCOVERY [RESEARCH] EMPATHY [FIELD STUDIES] CONCEPT DESIGN [IDEATION] PLAN [ROADMAP DEVEL- OPMENT] • Review of any raw data; immersion, call centre statistics, web analytics, existing research • Stakeholder interviews • Business case development • Competitive & Comparative Studies • Field /ethnographic studies • User Workshops & in- terviews • Opportunity Analysis • Ideation/innocation workshops (via innova- ton with SMEs and key business reps) • Concept Develop • Business case/model- ling • Social strategy • Proto-typing and test- ing • Prioritise initiatives • GAP Analysis • Roadmap development • Project management plan development; Resource, Cost, Scope, Comms, Change, Risk and integration • Final document 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 DOCUMENTATION & APPROVALS • Document vision (including narrative/ video document) • Finalise business case • Roadshows/ Presentations • Approvals IMPLEMENTATION • Rollout of initiatives • Continual testing and product improvement based on user feedback
  14. 14. #RelateLive Delivering a Global Experience Language Case Study
  15. 15. Global Experience Language • A Global Experience Language drives consistency and coherence across sites and cross-platform by using and re-using a standard set of designs and code. • It delivers a familiar/intuitive experience to users/customers as things work in the same way. Westpac GEL - © Westpac Group - https://gel.westpacgroup.com.au/
  16. 16. Global Experience Language • At DoE we’re laying the digital platform foundations by implementing a global experience framework strategy, including: • New content management system • Redevelop our public website and intranet into a single destination - education.nsw • Site sections are cheaper and faster to deliver by re-using patterns/designs that have been tested with users and are accessible. • DoE’s GEL is called GEF (Global Experience Framework).
  17. 17. Discovery & Empathy Stage •For us the user research and discovery phase is key, not just in solving the problem but in business acceptance and change management.  •Start with desk research •Competitor and comparative reviews – e.g. look at UK.GOV and BBC plus Westpac. •Involves field studies or ethnographic studies - essentially studying people’s behaviours in the context of their environment.   •To do this we visited teachers in their environments
  18. 18. Concepting/Ideation • To create our GEF we used concepting/ideation across a broad range of disciplines to create our designs • We also use co-design, that is engaging users or customers in the ideation process. • Ideation starts with broad range of ideas, then narrowed down into three and then one concept.
  19. 19. Concepting/Ideation • Designs are validated through a Proof of Concepts and user feedback. • Design Thinking states that anyone can be a designer and problem solve. • HOWEVER detailed design and visual design is completed by the UX and visual designers specialist. Design templates – Sarah Mills, Lead Visual Designer and Laura Zucchetti, Principal UX Designer
  20. 20. Concepting/Ideation • The idea is to test often as you iterate the designs “essentially run as many small tests as you can afford.” • The validation happened via a clickable proto-types testing the information architect or sitemap. • https://www.nngroup.com/articles/why-you-only-need-to-test-with-5-users
  21. 21. User Testing • Key to User Centered Design/Design Thinking is the validation of design with users. • The research with users is continuous from solving the problem to validation. • Our user research has run continuously for 12 months. To understand how and if ‘one site’ would work, we engaged 452 school staff and 276 corporate staff through user research activities. • May not sound a lot in comparison to market research, however, the focus here is on behavioural research. • Noting Nielsen Norman group show that 5 participants’ capture around 80% to 90% of error.
  22. 22. User Testing • Includes: • Lab Testing • Remote Testing • Guerrilla Testing • Contextual Inquires
  23. 23. Lab Tests • Includes use of test scripts and “Think-out Aloud” process were participants describe a task as they complete it. • The aim is to see if the application or website behaviours in the way it is intend. • Part of the testing includes attitudinal feedback from the participant. • These are behavioural tests as the tester observes the participant.
  24. 24. Remote Testing •User testing that is conducted remotely via video link. •Its key advantage is reduced cost and broader access to participants – E.G. Rural areas •Uses same structure as lab tests. •Can also be used to run shorter tests.
  25. 25. Guerrilla Testing • Contextual as its conducted in a real environment. • Unstructured in terms of recruitment – participants are people sourced in the environment – E.G. Testing in a Café would use available patrons. The incentive a free coffee.
  26. 26. Contextual Inquires • The contextual inquiry are interviews and observations gathered in the field with users. • It is done through interviews and observations of users completing task in context. • May also include 
 1) shadowing to observe a participant or 
 2) diary studies were participants record there own activities.
  27. 27. User Testing - What we Discovered • Users needed to login 3 times to access content • They access speed was an issue in some areas • That users want to go to a single destination - i.e they don’t see the difference between internet/intranet or portals • This highlighted, “despite our best endeavours to deliver an amazing experience, this could be destroyed if we didn’t fix some of the basics, such as Simple Sign On .” Clickable interactive that contains the Information Architecture and pathway for a specific set of tasks.
  28. 28. Persona & User Journeys • Part of the User Research Generates Personas and User Journeys Olivia our Primary School Teacher Persona Sample User Journey
  29. 29. User Journeys Example Sample User Journey - Virtual Assistant
  30. 30. Gaining Buying • To engage the business and seeking broader feedback we use “Drop in centres” and Roadshows.   • Drop in centres are an exhibition style of approach to presenting information. Visitors are invited to walk the walls and the Digital Team are at hand to answer questions. • Use of information boards with user interviews, concepts designs, user testing findings, personas, proto-types, user journey quite often linking video to the content via QR Codes. • Participants were encouraged to wear earphone attached to their handset to watch the video. • Our team was also there to answer questions and encourage feedback.
  31. 31. Gaining Buy In Drop in Centre – Persona Displayed on a Wall • To engage the business and seeking broader feedback we use “Drop in centres” and Roadshows.   • Drop in centres are an exhibition style of approach to presenting information. Visitors are invited to walk the walls and the Digital Team are at hand to answer questions.
  32. 32. Gaining Buy In QR Codes are used to link video to boards • Use of information boards with user interviews, concepts designs, user testing findings, personas, proto-types, user journey quite often linking video to the content via QR Codes. • Participants were encouraged to wear earphone attached to their handset to watch the video. • Our team was also there to answer questions and encourage feedback.
  33. 33. Wrap up We are now Phygital We have moved beyond channels… not just digital... not just physical but PHYGITAL 1 2 3 4 Service Design delivers Service Design allow us to deliver this experience by taking service development and design it with a user centric approach Users Research is key to design A key part of this involves users research/contextual enquires, proto-typing and validation with users Behaviours are key to research Research is based on behaviours rather than pure attitudes. Design should be iterative and continually evolving 5 Iterate Design should be iterative and continually evolving

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  • colorhive

    Jun. 5, 2018

Peter Buckmaster, Director, Digital Services, Communication and Engagement Directorate Organisations have always been challenged by changes in customer behaviour and preferences. But today, more than ever, technology is radically changing how companies and customers communicate. Our physical and digital methods of communication are increasingly intertwined, and there is a greater need for omnichannel brand outreach. And even when a brand wants to keep up, the resources and investment may not be there. There is hope—human-centered service design. By designing consistent and integrated customer experiences now, organisations can better understand where customer behaviours will be in the future.

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