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Social Media in Healthcare

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Social Media in Healthcare

  1. 1. Social media in health care<br />John Sharp, MSSA, PMP<br />
  2. 2. Objectives<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 2<br />Define Social Media<br />Describe the impact of social media on patient care <br />Outline appropriate use of social media for health care professionals, both during work hours and on personal time <br />
  3. 3. Disclosure<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 3<br />Advisory Board, Within3.com<br />Within3 enables that engagement by building and sustaining secure online communities for formal and informal networks of health professionals. <br />
  4. 4. Social Media Defined<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 4<br />Social media is a blending of technology and social interaction for the co-creation of value <br />Uses web-based technology to enable dialog<br />User-generated content<br />Social Networking a large part<br />Health 2.0 – User generated healthcare<br />Wikipedia, Health 2.0 Conference<br />
  5. 5. Traditional Websites – limited interaction<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 5<br />One-way communication- contact us<br /><ul><li> request appointment
  6. 6. ask a question</li></li></ul><li>Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 6<br />Social Media – Two way communication<br />My husband has had one conversation with a staff member at Cleveland Clinic, and I love you all already. The person he talked with was knowledgeable, professional, empathetic, and encouraging. Thank you for giving him hope after a long and difficult medical crisis. We can't wait for his surgery!<br />
  7. 7. Social Media – the Big Four<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 7<br />Facebook – 500 million users<br />Twitter - 145 million users <br />LinkedIn – 60 million<br />YouTube – more that 12 billion video views per month<br />
  8. 8. Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 8<br />Facebook for<br />organizations<br />
  9. 9. Twitter<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 9<br />Tags - #hcsm<br />Health CareSocial Media<br />
  10. 10. LinkedIn<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 10<br />610Connections link you to 4,782,747+ professionals<br />
  11. 11. LinkedinGroupsDiscussions<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 11<br />
  12. 12. Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 12<br />YouTube – Hospitals, Health Information<br />
  13. 13. Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 13<br />Social Media Presentations<br />
  14. 14. Social Media Uses in Health Care<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 14<br />Facebook – Wellness, links back to website<br />Twitter – daily wellness tips, seminars, discoveries<br />LinkedIn – recruitment, professional community<br />YouTube – content, diseases and conditions, discoveries, medical specialties, patient stories<br />
  15. 15. Social Media for Patients - Empowerment<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 15<br />Patient Communities<br />Health and Wellness Information<br />Custom Tools for monitoring/managing illness<br />
  16. 16. Patient Communities<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 16<br />
  17. 17. PatientsLikeMe.com- profile<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 17<br />
  18. 18. PatientsLikeMe – Personal Profile<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 18<br />
  19. 19. CaringBridge.org<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 19<br />Communicating <br />with family, friends<br />
  20. 20. Crowd Sourcing<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 20<br />
  21. 21. Blogs as the Center of Online Communities<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 21<br />
  22. 22. Health Information for Patients<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 22<br />
  23. 23. Combining Health Content and Community<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 23<br />Content<br />Discuss<br />
  24. 24. Information on Treatments<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 24<br />Integration with Personal Health Record<br />
  25. 25. Custom Health Tools for Patients<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 25<br />
  26. 26. Wellness Challenge<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 26<br />
  27. 27. Managing Diabetes<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 27<br />
  28. 28. Helping Patients Find Useful Social Media Tools<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 28<br />Post 3 times a day<br />
  29. 29. What to Recommend to Patients<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 29<br />As with healthcare websites, start with reliable, well known organizations – hospitals, non-profits<br />Depends on the patient’s motivation, tech savy-ness<br />Review the sites within your area of interest<br />Cancer – ACOR.org<br />Diabetes – Diabetesmine.com<br />ALS, MS – PatientsLikeMe.com<br />Prescribe social media? The ePatient Dave Story<br />
  30. 30. ePatient Dave<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 30<br />Diagnosed with Stage IVkidney cancer<br />Oncologist prescribe ACOR<br />Discovered a support groupand new information on currenttreatments<br />Now cancer free<br />Speaking, writing on the empowerment of online communities<br />
  31. 31. Unhelpful Social Media<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 31<br />Promote unproven treatments<br />Cancer communities promoting marijuana use<br />Pain communities as potential sources for prescription drugs<br />Unsubstantiated rumors about vaccination side effects<br />Links to bogus treatments<br />Social media like Twitter and Facebook can link to anything and may point someone away from effective treatment (experience-based rather than evidence-based)<br />Information overload <br />health information sites plus social media can easily overload a desperate patient<br />
  32. 32. Social Media At Work<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 32<br />
  33. 33. Communities for health care professionals<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 33<br />Promote a broad base of professional support<br />Latest news, trends<br />Job opportunities<br />Reviews of books and journal articles<br />Greater ownership in national organizations<br />
  34. 34. Physician Social Networking<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 34<br />Clinical case discussions<br />Clinical Trial management<br />Professional associations<br />Discussions before, during and after professional meetings<br />
  35. 35. Social Work Networks<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 35<br />
  36. 36. Nursing Communities<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 36<br />
  37. 37. LinkedIn – for Recruitment<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 37<br />
  38. 38. Employee Social Media Policy<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 38<br />Don’tshare any information about patients<br />Any selling or soliciting donations must be approved in advance<br />Make it clear that you are posting your own opinions and not those of your employer<br />Don’tpublish confidential or proprietary information<br />Posting and viewing social media sites should not interfere with your work<br />Post to social media sites should not contain any product or service endorsements or any content that may construed as political lobbying, solicitations or contributions<br />Approved Social Media Networkers should stay within the scope of their role in posting on behalf of the organization<br />
  39. 39. Professional versus Personal<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 39<br />What is appropriate to share?<br />Who to share with?<br />How to control privacy? <br />Does privacy exist anymore?<br />What about harassment? <br />
  40. 40. Understand privacy settings<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 40<br />
  41. 41. Closed versus Open Communities<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 41<br />Closed communities are rare in social media- Will ask you to validate your identity<br />Most allow anonymous user accounts – can’t confirm other’s identity<br />Who is listening, watching? – hospital staff post photo takenof dying patient on Facebook – LA Times, 8/8/10<br />
  42. 42. Patient Contact Through Social Media<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 42<br />Patients or families want to “friend” you on Facebook<br />Ignore? – will they ask you in person<br />Allow? – how will you respond outside of the clinical setting? Do you want them to know about your family, vacations, fiends?<br />HIPAA violation once you discuss clinical issues<br />Have a personal policy which follows the institutional policy<br />“I don’t friend my patients/clients online but I would be glad to direct you to some helpful sites/communities”<br />
  43. 43. Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 43<br />Future<br />Wellness<br />Convergence<br /><ul><li>Comprehensive</li></ul>Online experience<br />-Interact withonline communities<br />-mobile apps<br />-home monitoring<br />-wellness &disease prevention<br />-new social mediatrends<br />Health Content<br />Website<br />Find MD<br />Second Opinion<br />eHealth<br />PHR<br />Google Health<br />Twitter<br />blogs<br />Social Media<br />Facebook<br />YouTube<br />
  44. 44. card.ly/JohnSharp<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 44<br />
  45. 45. Links<br />Social Media in Healthcare l October 1, 2010 l 45<br />www.delicious.com/johnsharp/promedica<br />Delicious is an online bookmark organizer which allows you to tag links and share with others<br />

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