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Covid19 webinar final

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Final version with newer information. Mar 28 2020

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Covid19 webinar final

  1. 1. Tactical Solutions for Workplace Safety During the Coronavirus Pandemic Rachel Allshiny John Newquist Janet Schulte NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  2. 2. Global Information as March 26, 2020 RAPID INCREASES GLOBAL SPREAD Date Deaths Infected March 26 1004 69,684 March 20 195 13,676 March 6 12 233 February 28 0 55 Infections and Deaths 495,086 Infected globally 69,684 Infected USA 7,503 deaths Italy 4,145 Deaths Spain 3,287 Deaths China 1,004 Death USA NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  3. 3. What is a Coronavirus? ● Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. ● In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). ● The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  4. 4. What is COVID-19? • COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. • This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Although it is constantly changing, as of early March 9, 2020: ● 111,228 confirmed cases of COVID-19 ● 3,892 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 ● 62,369 confirmed recovered patients NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  5. 5. What is COVID-19? Image via 3M • COVID-19 is 0.125 um (microns) NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  6. 6. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Similarities Symptoms • Fever • Body aches • Fatigue • Cough • Shortness of breath • Sometimes vomiting and diarrhea • Can be mild or severe • Can be fatal in rare cases NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  7. 7. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Similarities Transmission: • Can be spread from person to person through droplets in the air from an infected person coughing, sneezing or talking. • COVID-19 might be spread through airborne routes (see Differences slide). • Like the flu, it is possible COVID-19 can be spread by an infected person for several days before symptoms appear — but we don’t yet know for sure. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  8. 8. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Similarities Treatment: • Neither virus is treatable with antibiotics, which only work on bacterial infections. • Both are treated by addressing symptoms, such as reducing fever. • Severe cases may require hospitalization and support such as mechanical ventilation NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  9. 9. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Similarities Prevention: ● Frequent, thorough hand washing ● Covering your nose when sneezing, and coughing into the crook of your elbow ● Staying home when sick ● Limiting contact with people who are infected or have reason to believe they might have come into contact with anyone who is. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  10. 10. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Differences Cause: COVID-19: Caused by one virus, the novel 2019 coronavirus, now called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2. Flu: Caused by any of several different types and strains of influenza viruses. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  11. 11. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Differences While the flu and COVID-19 may be transmitted in similar ways, there is also one possible difference: COVID-19 might be spread through the airborne route, meaning that tiny droplets remaining in the air could cause disease in others even after the ill person is no longer near. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  12. 12. COVID-19: Incubation The incubation period for COVID- 19 (i.e. the time between exposure to the virus and onset of symptoms) is currently estimated at between two and 14 days. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  13. 13. COVID-19 Life JHI: COVID-19 can persist on inanimate surfaces like metal, glass or plastic for up to 9 days, but can be efficiently inactivated by surface disinfection procedures with 62–71% ethanol, 0.5% hydrogen peroxide or 0.1% sodium hypochlorite within 1 minute NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  14. 14. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Differences Antiviral Medications COVID-19: Antiviral medications are currently being tested to see if they can address symptoms. Flu: Antiviral medications can address symptoms and sometimes shorten the duration of the illness. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  15. 15. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Differences Vaccine: COVID-19: No vaccine is available at this time, though it is in progress. Flu: A vaccine is available and effective to prevent some of the most dangerous types or to reduce the severity of the flu. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  16. 16. COVID-19 vs Influenza: Differences ● The COVID-19 situation is changing rapidly. ● Since this disease is caused by a new virus, people do not have immunity to it, and a vaccine may be many months away. ● Doctors and scientists are working on estimating the mortality rate of COVID-19, but at present, it is thought to be higher than that of most strains of the flu. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  17. 17. COVID-19 Animals ● Health authorities in Hong Kong have confirmed that a dog belonging to a person who had contracted the coronavirus had also tested a 'weak positive' for the virus. ● It is the first reported case of human-to-animal transmission of the virus.. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  18. 18. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work All employers need to consider how best to decrease the spread of COVID-19 and lower the impact in their workplace. This may include activities in one or more of the following areas: reduce transmission among employees, maintain healthy business operations, and maintain a healthy work environment. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  19. 19. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work Reduce Transmission Employees who have symptoms (i.e., fever, cough, or shortness of breath) should notify their supervisor and stay home. Employees should not return to work until the criteria to discontinue home isolation are met, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments. Employees who are well but who have a sick family member at home with COVID-19 should notify their supervisor. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  20. 20. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work Maintain a Heathy Business Operation Identify a workplace coordinator who will be responsible for COVID-19 issues and their impact at the workplace. Implement flexible sick leave and supportive policies and practices. Employers that do not currently offer sick leave to some or all of their employees may want to draft non-punitive “emergency sick leave” policies. Employers should not require a positive COVID-19 test result or a healthcare provider’s note for employees who are sick to validate their illness, qualify for sick leave, or to return to work. Healthcare provider offices and medical facilities may be extremely busy and not able to provide such documentation in a timely manner CDC – Medical when a fever of 100.4 or higher. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  21. 21. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work Maintain a healthy work environment Consider improving the engineering controls using the building ventilation system. This may include some or all of the following activities: Increase ventilation rates. Increase the percentage of outdoor air that circulates into the system. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  22. 22. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work Maintain a healthy work environment Support respiratory etiquette and hand hygiene for employees, customers, and worksite visitors: Provide tissues and no-touch disposal receptacles. Provide soap and water in the workplace. Place hand sanitizers in multiple locations to encourage hand hygiene. Place posters that encourage hand hygiene to help stop the spread at the entrance to your workplace and in other workplace areas where they are likely to be seen. Discourage handshaking – encourage the use of other noncontact methods of greeting. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  23. 23. COVID-19 What Happens When I go Back to Work Maintain a healthy work environment Routinely clean and disinfect all frequently touched surfaces in the workplace, such as workstations, keyboards, telephones, handrails, and doorknobs. Discourage workers from using other workers’ phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment, when possible, Provide disposable wipes so that commonly used surfaces. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  24. 24. COVID-19 What Can I Expect Next? Expect: More testing. More Ventilators. More PPE NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  25. 25. Quinine Hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are oral prescription drugs that have been used for treatment of malaria and certain inflammatory conditions. A (NONPEER REVIEWED) study in China reported that chloroquine treatment of COVID-19 patients had clinical and virologic benefit versus a comparison group, and chloroquine was added as a recommended antiviral for treatment of COVID-19 in China Based upon limited in-vitro and anecdotal data, chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine are currently recommended for treatment of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in several countries. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  26. 26. Potassium A new research (NON PEER REVIEW) study by researchers from Wenzhou Medical University in Zhejiang province lead by Dr Don Chen revealed that almost all Covid- 19 patients exhibited hypokalemia and that supplementation with potassium ions was one of the many factors that assisted in their recovery. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  27. 27. N95 Respirators N95 will filter out more than 95% of the particles Shortages presently 100% acrylic scarf, double wrapped 3M 1900 Furnace Filter Cloth triple layers. NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020
  28. 28. Any Questions? NATIONAL SAFETY EDUCATION CENTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2020

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