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Motivational Interviewing
The Basics
JohnDye MRC LICDC-CS
Sami Clinician
Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare
2020 West Broad...
The Definition of MI
Motivational Interviewing is an effective way of talking with
individuals about the work of change.
What makes MI effective?
MI is evidenced based, 1200 publications or more supports it’s effectiveness.
There are four core principles of MI:
Express empathy----Build rapport
Roll with resistance---respect client autonomy
Deve...
Change is not quick or easy.
What kind of change are we talking about?
People face many decisions that require change at e...
Difficult decisions later in life include.
Medical Decisions
Retirement
Living alone
Accepting Help
When change is hard its NOT always because of
Lack of information
Laziness
Oppositional personality
Denial
When change is hard its often because of
Ambivalence
Wanting and not wanting change at the
same time.
Because ambivalence is uncomfortable it often leads to
Procrastination
Which is often seen by the counselor as resistance....
Partnership: Work together, avoid the role of the expert. Equal partnership working with the client. “ I value you and am
...
4 Skills of MI
(OARS)
1. Open Questions
2. Affirmations
3. Reflections
4. Summaries
Open Questions
1. You might ask your client:
How much alcohol do you drink everyday?
Translated into MI speak:
What role d...
2. Affirmations
Awards Words of Encouragement
Attempts
Achievements
Accomplishments
Anything the clinician see’s positive ...
Affirmation Examples
You really care about your family.
This is hard work that you are engaged in.
It took a lot of courag...
3. Reflection
Understanding what the client is thinking & feeling and saying it back to the client.
No questions just refl...
4. Summary
A long reflection of more than one client
statement.___________________________________________________________...
The Four Processes
Engaging
Feeling Welcome
Feeling comfortable
Feeling Understood
Having mutual goals
Feeling Hopeful
Dis- engaging
Assessing----
Telling----
Client is seen as impaired, unable to understand situation;
Counselor imposes “rea...
“I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you...
Focusing
An ongoing process of seeking and maintaining direction.
Agreeing on an agenda, goals & priorities, clear directi...
Evoking
Eliciting a clients own motivation for change.
Eliciting Change Talk
Planning
Developing a specific change plan that the client
agrees to and is willing to implement.
Change Talk
Client speech that favors movement in the direction of change.
“I want” … “I wish”…. “The reasons are” …. “ I ...
Planning
Developing a specific change plan that the client agrees to and is willing to implement.
Smart Plan
S – Specific
M – Measureable
A – Attainable
R – Realistic
T – Timely
Develop a Change Plan
SMART: Specific. Measureable. Attainable. Reasonable. Timely.
“I will try to quit smoking”
VS.
“Star...
Additional Resources
Miller, William and Rollnick, Stephen, Motivational
Interviewing: Helping People Change. Third Editio...
Motivational Interviewing
Motivational Interviewing
Motivational Interviewing
Motivational Interviewing
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Motivational Interviewing

  1. 1. Motivational Interviewing The Basics JohnDye MRC LICDC-CS Sami Clinician Twin Valley Behavioral Healthcare 2020 West Broad Street Columbus ,Ohio 43223
  2. 2. The Definition of MI Motivational Interviewing is an effective way of talking with individuals about the work of change.
  3. 3. What makes MI effective? MI is evidenced based, 1200 publications or more supports it’s effectiveness.
  4. 4. There are four core principles of MI: Express empathy----Build rapport Roll with resistance---respect client autonomy Develop discrepancy----Elicit pros and cons….identify between goals and current behavior. Support self-efficacy----communicate to the client he/she is capable of change. CORE PRINCIPLES
  5. 5. Change is not quick or easy. What kind of change are we talking about? People face many decisions that require change at every stage of life. Addictions/Drugs Housing Career Marriage/Relationships That’s just to name a few.
  6. 6. Difficult decisions later in life include. Medical Decisions Retirement Living alone Accepting Help
  7. 7. When change is hard its NOT always because of Lack of information Laziness Oppositional personality Denial
  8. 8. When change is hard its often because of Ambivalence Wanting and not wanting change at the same time.
  9. 9. Because ambivalence is uncomfortable it often leads to Procrastination Which is often seen by the counselor as resistance. In motivational interviewing we revert from the term resistance.
  10. 10. Partnership: Work together, avoid the role of the expert. Equal partnership working with the client. “ I value you and am delighted to work with you”. Acceptances: Respect the clients autonomy strength and hope. Compassion: Keep the clients best interest in mind. Evocation: The best ideas come from the client.
  11. 11. 4 Skills of MI (OARS) 1. Open Questions 2. Affirmations 3. Reflections 4. Summaries
  12. 12. Open Questions 1. You might ask your client: How much alcohol do you drink everyday? Translated into MI speak: What role does alcohol play in your life?
  13. 13. 2. Affirmations Awards Words of Encouragement Attempts Achievements Accomplishments Anything the clinician see’s positive about the client.
  14. 14. Affirmation Examples You really care about your family. This is hard work that you are engaged in. It took a lot of courage coming in today knowing that you would test positive today.
  15. 15. 3. Reflection Understanding what the client is thinking & feeling and saying it back to the client. No questions just reflection. In MI the clinician use reflection to convey empathy and understanding. To see the world through the eyes of the client.
  16. 16. 4. Summary A long reflection of more than one client statement._______________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________ Reinforce patient’s motivation to change Highlight realizations Identify transitions, progress or themes
  17. 17. The Four Processes
  18. 18. Engaging Feeling Welcome Feeling comfortable Feeling Understood Having mutual goals Feeling Hopeful
  19. 19. Dis- engaging Assessing---- Telling---- Client is seen as impaired, unable to understand situation; Counselor imposes “reality” of situation “Client is assumed to lack capacity for self-direction; Counselor tells patient what he/she must do” Power---- Authority figure. “I'm the Counselor” Labeling-----
  20. 20. “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Maya Angelou
  21. 21. Focusing An ongoing process of seeking and maintaining direction. Agreeing on an agenda, goals & priorities, clear direction.
  22. 22. Evoking Eliciting a clients own motivation for change. Eliciting Change Talk
  23. 23. Planning Developing a specific change plan that the client agrees to and is willing to implement.
  24. 24. Change Talk Client speech that favors movement in the direction of change. “I want” … “I wish”…. “The reasons are” …. “ I can” … “It would solve problems”
  25. 25. Planning Developing a specific change plan that the client agrees to and is willing to implement.
  26. 26. Smart Plan S – Specific M – Measureable A – Attainable R – Realistic T – Timely
  27. 27. Develop a Change Plan SMART: Specific. Measureable. Attainable. Reasonable. Timely. “I will try to quit smoking” VS. “Starting on Monday, I will cut back on 1 cigarette per day until I have reached zero cigarettes.”
  28. 28. Additional Resources Miller, William and Rollnick, Stephen, Motivational Interviewing: Helping People Change. Third Edition. New York: Guilford Press, 2012. Prochaska, J., Norcross, J. and DiClemente, C. Changing for Good. New York: Harper and Collins, 1994 Rollnick, S. and Miller, W.R., What is Motivational Interviewing? Behavioral and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 23, 325-334, 1995. Rollnick, Stephen, Miller, William, and Butler, Christopher, Motivational Interviewing in Health Care, New York, Guilford Press, 2008. Rosengren, David, Building Motivational Skills: A Practitioner Workbook, Guilford Press, 2009.
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