An Enterprise Ontology based approach to Model-Driven Engineering

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The presentation of a Model-Driven Enterprise Engineering (MDEE) approach based on a sound theoretical foundation, providing end-to-end guidance to refine and transform an organization model into an IT system supporting that organization.

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  • To read more information on Model-Driven Enterprise Engineering and some background information of this presentation, see http://www.theenterprisearchitect.eu/archive/2009/10/15/an-enterprise-ontology-based-approach-to-model-driven-engineering
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An Enterprise Ontology based approach to Model-Driven Engineering

  1. 1. An Enterprise Ontology based approach to Model-Driven Engineering Model-Driven Development isn’t about making the computer do your work for you, but stopping you from doing the computer’s work via proper separation of concerns. - Rafael Chaves (@abstratt) Johan den Haan
  2. 2. Model-Driven
  3. 3. Overview  Research goal  Model-Driven Engineering (MDE)  Enterprise Ontology  Model-Driven Enterprise Engineering (MDEE)  The MDEE approach  Conclusions & Contributions
  4. 4. Research goal Design an MDEE approach based on a sound theoretical foundation, providing end-to-end guidance to refine and transform an organization model into an IT system supporting that organization
  5. 5. MDE - Goal  Raise abstraction and automation  To increase productivity  Short-term: build faster  Long-term: less sensitive for changes
  6. 6. MDE - Definition
  7. 7. MDE – multi-model
  8. 8. Enterprise Ontology  Theoretical foundation for MDEE  Human ability: Forma – Informa – Performa  Why? – Layered view on organizations – Applied to service specification – Applied to component identification – Proven in practice
  9. 9. Model-Driven Enterprise Engineering - MDEE
  10. 10. MDEE  Architecture – Easy to change IT systems – Encourage reuse of autonomous building blocks – Separation of business logic and infrastructure code  Starting point: SOA principles of Thomas Erl  Service Component Architecture (SCA) – Components – Services – References
  11. 11. MDEE
  12. 12. Organization model  Reverse engineering  Organization multi-model Construction Process State Action B I D
  13. 13. Service Specification model (1)  Service: delivered by executor of transaction  Service identification – Assumption: one service for each transaction – B, I, D service based on transaction type – IT or Human is a human decision  Service specification – Generic Service Specification Framework – Terlouw & Albani
  14. 14. Service Specification model (2) IT Human B I D
  15. 15. Business Component Construction model
  16. 16. Component Construction model (1)  Business Component Construction multi- model  Components – Provided services – Consumed services – Information objects
  17. 17. Component Construction model (2) Transaction enclosing Transactions related Service interactions types through Withing the same aspect Action rules Orchestration organization Across aspect Actor shaping Service parts are called by organizations the implementation of the composite service
  18. 18. Component Construction model (3)  Construction design – Service orchestration design – Component identification (BCI3D) – Component specification
  19. 19. Business Component Implementation model
  20. 20. How to come to an executable model?  Component-Based Software Engineering – Component model (SCA) – Component framework  Model-driven – Engine – Implementation model
  21. 21. How to come to an executable model?  Service implementation types – Human – IT – Data
  22. 22. Implementing service orchestrations  WS-BPEL  SCA component
  23. 23. Implementing human services  Supporting humans with tasks  WS-BPEL + BPEL4People + WS-HumanTask
  24. 24. Implementing IT services  Default SCA component implementation is Java  We want higher level models  Need to model infological production acts  WS-BPEL + 3 additional activities – Validate (content) – Calculate – Change
  25. 25. Implementing data services  Need to model datalogical production acts  WS-BPEL + 5 additional activities – Validate (format) – Create – Retrieve – Store – Delete  Database schema
  26. 26. Component Implementation model  Engineering – Coordination part • Service orchestration -> WS-BPEL process • SCA component configurations • SCA composite containing all SCA components – Production part • SCA composite for each component • SCA component for each provided service • Each SCA component contains implementation model for service
  27. 27. Component Implementation model
  28. 28. Component Implementation model  Implementation – Transform all configurations and models into XML files – Bundle them in SCA contributions – Deploy these contributions on an SCA framework  Needed engines – SCA framework – WS-BPEL engine (service orchestrations) – WS-BPEL engine + WS-HumanTask extension (human services) – WS-BPEL engine + custom activities (IT services) – WS-BPEL engine + custom activities (data services) – DBMS (data services)
  29. 29. Conclusions & Contributions
  30. 30. Conclusion
  31. 31. Contributions  A formal, clear definition of MDE  MDE applied to Enterprise Engineering  First formal end-to-end approach – From organization to IT implementation – With mostly automatable transformations  Combining DEMO, I- and D-organization, service specification, component identification, and MDE and DSL approaches  Real-life example of Insurance company
  32. 32. An Enterprise Ontology based approach to Model-Driven Engineering Blog http://www.theenterprisearchitect.eu Twitter: @JohanDenHaan @ModelDriven

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