The Ripple Effect: The Role of Leadership & Management in Workplace Health (Dr. Joel Bennett)

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WORKSHOP AT 2010 HOUSTON WELLNESS ASSOCIATION. Designed to be used with self-assessment handout.

OBJECTIVES
1) Understand the three main paths of the ripple effect (healthy role model, job design, heart-centered leadership)
2) Review research supporting the ripple effect
3) Review and/or take self-assessments that pertain to each path
4) Re-assess personal legacy and personal influence on the ripple effect

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The Ripple Effect: The Role of Leadership & Management in Workplace Health (Dr. Joel Bennett)

  1. 1. The Ripple Effect: The Role of Leadership & Management in Workplace Health<br />2010 WELLNESS SYMPOSIUM<br />Strategies for Companies &<br />Communities to Impact Health in <br />A Changing Economy<br />Facilitator<br />Dr. Joel B. Bennett<br />Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  2. 2. The ripple effect of a leader&apos;s enthusiasm and optimism is awesome. <br /> - General Colin Powell <br />
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION<br />We need a program for leaders who want to improve/maintain this relationship, their own health, and enhance the overall strength of their workplace.<br />Employees will tell you that the number one driver of their own health, stress, and productivity is their relationship with <br />their boss.<br />FREE ACCESS: http://207.32.116.96/owls/execuprev_2004/index.html<br />
  4. 4. Key Quote<br />Executive healthis not simply a personal issue; it has collective consequences for all members of any organization who depend upon the strength, experience, skills, and insights of its leaders… <br /> One strong, healthy executive in a key organizational position can serve as a primary prevention agent for tens, hundreds, and even thousands of employees who serve under his or her wing. Therefore, the interests of the organization as well as its individual executives are served well by the preventive health management of its executive cadre.<br /> (Quick et al., 2002; pp. 41-42)<br />
  5. 5. Objectives<br />Understand the three main paths of the ripple effect (healthy role model, job design, heart-centered leadership)<br />Review research supporting the ripple effect<br />Review and/or take self-assessments that pertain to each path<br />Re-assess personal legacy and personal influence on the ripple effect<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  6. 6. LeadWell~LiveWell<br />Workplace managers and executives can present significant medical savings to an organization through three positive paths of influence:<br />(1) they provide supportive supervision and positive leadership, a known health protective factor in the work environment; <br /> (2) they model heart healthy life-styles to associates (role modeling);<br />(3) managers and executives make decisions about providing EAP/health promotion programs. <br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  7. 7. HUG YOUR BOSS: Special ATTENTION<br />Managers have a unique set of needs for protecting against cardiovascular risk<br />Programming should be suited to these needs<br />Combine LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT with WELLNESS SUPPORT<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  8. 8. How it Works<br />The Ripple Effect<br />https://www.execuprev.com/content/login.cfm<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  9. 9. Ripple Effect Literature Review (Sample 1)<br />Leader behavior impacts employee well-being (Gavin & Kelley, 1978; Gilbreath & Benson, 2004). <br />Workers who felt treated fairly by their bosses have lower CVD risk up to 8 years later (Kivimäki et al., 2005). <br />Inverse relationship between supportive behavior in immediate supervisors and employee ratings of burn-out (Constable & Russel, 1986; Russel, Altmaier, & Van Velzen, 1987; Burke, Shearer, & Deszca, 1984; Seltzer & Numerof, 1988). <br />When leaders are perceived as concerned, honest, and consistent, their subordinates experience reduced stress (Alimo-Metcalfe and Alban-Metcalfe; 2003). <br />Employees with emotionally abusive supervisors (e.g., ridicules, blames) have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and emotional exhaustion six months later (Tepper, 2000).<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  10. 10. Ripple Effect Literature Review (Sample 2)<br />Meta-analysis 73 studies, perceived organizational support (POS): fairness and supervisor supports have greatest relationship: “Employees with high POS generally…suffer fewer strain symptoms such as fatigue, burnout, anxiety, and headaches.” (Rhoades & Eisenberger, 2002)<br />Longitudinal study of female hospital workers (doctors, nurses, administrative, and maintenance), 10 locations, managerial practices predicted sickness absence, minor psychiatric morbidity, health status 2 years later (Kivimäki, Elovainio, Vahtera,  & Ferrie, 2003).<br />Importantly, across these and other studies –no moderator effects for organizational type, suggesting that these effects do not vary by job level, industry, or intra-study site differences.<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  11. 11. Ripple Effect is UNIVERSAL<br /> Across these and other studies – no moderator effects for organizational type.<br /> These effects do not vary by job level, industry, or intra-study site differences.<br />
  12. 12. 12<br />Stress Affects Business Results but Little Action Taken<br />Long Hours, Doing More With Less<br />Ability of Managers to Recognize Stress<br />It is getting worse!<br />Manager Ability-Find Solutions for Stress<br />*Percent of respondents indicating “to a great extent” or “to a very great extent”<br />Watson Wyatt “Staying@work” 2008 Study (n = 355 HR Directors; 1,000+ EE)<br />
  13. 13. PATH 1<br />Healthy Role Modeling<br />
  14. 14. PATH 1: Healthy Role Modeling<br />Four Dimensions:<br />Physical (exercise, diet, symptom monitoring)<br />Emotional (stress, hostility)<br />Spiritual (big picture, sense of purpose)<br />Ethical (conscience, moral compass)<br />Work-Life Balance<br />Use and describe how I benefit from the wellness program<br />
  15. 15. © 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  16. 16. SURVEY 1 (DEEPER DIVE ON PATH 1)<br />S=Spiritual; P=Physical; E=Ethical; Em=Emotional<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  17. 17. PATH 2<br />Work & Job Design<br />
  18. 18. Path 2: DESIGN: Jobs + Wellness Programming<br />ATTEND TO THE THREE LEGS OF THE STOOL<br />Offer wellness programs<br />Policies and environmental support<br />Three main work conditions that significantly influence cardiovascular disease<br />JOB STRAIN (HIGH DEMAND + LOW CONTROL)<br /> EFFORT-REWARD IMBALANCE<br />SUPERVISOR SUPPORTIVENESS<br />
  19. 19. Both Work SETTING and LIFESTYLE<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  20. 20. Strategic Elements of the Launch Pad<br /> CEO/Mgr<br /> Engagement<br /> Organization<br /> (Policy)<br />Individual <br /> Health<br />External Support<br />& Community<br />Integration<br />Environment<br />Team/Support<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  21. 21. Strategy Matrix for Wellness Planning<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  22. 22. SURVEY 1 (DEEPER DIVE ON PATH 2)<br />Range between -8 and +24<br />-8 to 0: Very Weak<br />0 to 6: Weak<br />6 to 10: Moderate<br />10 to 15: Strong<br />16 to 24: Very Strong<br />Items 1 to 4: Lifestyle; Items 5 to 8: Work Support<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  23. 23. PATH 3<br />Heart-Centered Leadership<br />
  24. 24. Path 3: Heart-Centered Leadership<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  25. 25. Heart-Centered Leadership<br />Dr. Joel Bennett ~ owls@charter.net<br />
  26. 26. Heart-Centered Leadership <br />
  27. 27. SURVEY 3 (DEEPER DIVE ON PATH 3)<br />Wellness<br />Balance<br />Presence<br />Teamwork<br />Accounta-<br />bility<br />Coping<br />Support<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  28. 28. Contact<br />Joel B. Bennett, President Ashleigh Schwab, Project Director<br />Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems <br />3221 Collinsworth St., Suite 220  <br />Fort Worth, Texas, 76107<br />817.921.4260 office  <br />817.845.2772 cell  <br />learn@organizationalwellness.com <br />www.organizationalwellness.com<br />Resource<br />PROTOTYPE: http://207.32.116.96/owls/execuprev_2004/index.html<br />PROGRAM: www.execuprev.com<br />

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