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Effective Small Business Wellness (workshop)

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This workshop is designed to create collaborative problem solving for participants around a hypothetical scenario (See Part 4) to create a small business wellness initiative in the community.
Participants are assigned to tables for diversity of composition (employees, employers, providers, insurers, non-profits).
The room also has experts from the community available for consultation.
The goal is to identify key elements and strategy needed to launch an effective community-based wellness initiative that supports small businesses.
This full-day workshop was conducted at the Houston Wellness Association in January of 2010 with about 30 participants
This is PART 1 of the slide deck; PART 2 reviews the results of the grant-funded Small Business Wellness Initiative (www.sbwi.org)
Please contact OWLS at learn@organizationalwellness.com if you would like technical assistance or training on how to conduct this workshop and launch an SBWI in your community

Published in: Business, News & Politics
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Effective Small Business Wellness (workshop)

  1. 1. Build it and They Will Come: Launching an Effective Program for Small and Medium Size Companies<br />2010 WELLNESS SYMPOSIUM<br />Strategies for Companies &<br />Communities to Impact Health in <br />A Changing Economy<br />Facilitator<br />Dr. Joel B. Bennett<br />Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  2. 2. WORKSHOP OUTLINE<br />This workshop is designed to create collaborative problem solving for participants around a hypothetical scenario (See Part 4) to create a small business wellness initiative in the community.<br />Participants are assigned to tables for diversity of composition (employees, employers, providers, insurers, non-profits).<br />The room also has experts from the community available for consultation.<br />The goal is to identify key elements and strategy needed to launch an effective community-based wellness initiative that supports small businesses.<br />This full-day workshop was conducted at the Houston Wellness Association in January of 2010 with about 30 participants<br />This is PART 1 of the slide deck; PART 2 reviews the results of the grant-funded Small Business Wellness Initiative (www.sbwi.org)<br />Please contact OWLS at learn@organizationalwellness.com if you would like technical assistance or training on how to conduct this workshop and launch an SBWI in your community<br />
  3. 3. Other Presenters<br />Olivia M. Dear, Director<br />TexHealth Harris County 3-Share Plan (Harris County Healthcare Alliance)<br />Ashly Alberto, Corporate Market Director, <br /> Houston Heart Walk, American Heart Association<br />SebabiLeballo, Organizational Development Manager, HCSS, Construction Software & Services<br />Daniel Francik , Corporate Ambassador<br />HCSS, Construction Software & Services <br />
  4. 4. EMPLOYEES<br /> EMPLOYERS or their representative<br />A. Very Small Business Owner/Employee-<br /> less than 100 employees (not wellness provider);<br />B. Small Business Owner<br /> 100 to 500 employees (not wellness provider)<br />C. Small to Medium<br /> larger than 500 employees (not wellness provider)<br /> PROVIDER (Wellness Practitioner)<br /> INSURER<br /> CORPORATE Representative<br /> NON-PROFIT agency<br />Participants (YOU): Which best describes you?<br />
  5. 5. Each table has good representation?<br />
  6. 6. LAUNCHPAD<br />Small Business<br />Wellness Program<br />Workshop Segments<br />Strategy<br />Key Elements<br />
  7. 7. What we mean by “SMALL” businesses<br />26%<br />87%<br />11%<br />46%<br />1%<br />24%<br />These data refer to the first quarter of 2004, downloaded from the BLS Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW) website http://www.bls.gov/cew/ (accessed June 2005).<br />
  8. 8. Why Small Business? Top Ten Reasons<br />SBs significantly less likely to do Health Promotion* <br />SBs are 99% of all employers, w/60% of workforce<br />Have generated 60% to 80% of net new jobs<br />Employ majority of workers in a given community<br />Sickness absence impacts work (replacement issues)<br />1 person has more social modeling (CEO-ripple effect)<br />With less insurance, prevention more important<br />Many SBs have positive work culture to leverage<br />Entrepreneur/CEOs have humanitarian motives<br />Promising practices exist (CDC SWAT study)<br />* Healthy People 2010 targeted 75% businesses to receive wellness, but <50% do so and some indication this is declining<br />
  9. 9. More on the Insurance Problem<br />The principal barrier to small businesses in Texas offering employer-sponsored health insurance is affordability.<br />Recent US Census reports indicate that 1:3 Harris County non-elderly adults are uninsured; almost a quarter of the state’s population. <br />Two-thirds of uninsured adults are employed, with 44 percent working at firms that employ less than 25 workers. <br />Small business employers who depend on health insurance to attract and retain workers are finding it hard to find cost-effective insurance for their employees.<br />
  10. 10. Part 1: What are SBs doing?(norms and trends)<br />SIZE MATTERS<br />
  11. 11. Society of Human Resource Management 2009 Benefits Survey (% offering benefit)<br />3,000 HR managers randomly selected from 250,000—www.shrm.org<br />ISBN 978-1-586-44155-5—SHRM 2009 Employee Benefits Report<br />
  12. 12. Selected Programs compare with National Survey<br />
  13. 13. Five Areas to be Compared<br />Note. Gym membership is 30% to 35%, NO<br />size differences<br />
  14. 14. 2004 national worksite health promotion survey<br />Directed by “Healthy People 2010” Initiative<br />Random telephone survey<br />Worksites sample (not organizations)<br />Respondents “directly responsible for health promotion or wellness” or “in-depth knowledge of these types of programs at the worksite”<br />Sample size 730 (60% response rate compares with 19% rate in SHRM survey)<br />Over-sampled small businesses (compares with more corporate focus of SHRM survey)<br />Linnan, L., Bowling, M., Childress, J., Lindsay, G., Blakey, C., Pronk, S., Wieker, S., & Royall, P. (2008). <br />Results of the 2004 national worksite health promotion survey. American Journal of Public Health, 98(1), 1-7.<br />
  15. 15. Comparing HR with those more familiar<br />Providers (National Survey)<br />HR Personnel (SHRM)<br />
  16. 16. Focus on Small Businesses (2000, California)<br />PHYSICALHEALTH<br />BEHAVIOR<br />MANAGEMENT<br />SAFETYPROGRAMS<br />Violence<br />Prevention<br />Substance<br />Abuse<br />Prevention<br />Stress<br />Manage-<br />ment<br />Counseling<br />Smoking<br />Cessation<br />Cholesterol<br />Screening<br />Physical<br />Fitness<br />Diet or<br />Weight<br />Manage-<br />ment<br />1,846 Small Businesses Surveyed (sizes 2-14, 15-99, 100-500)<br />[Los Angeles and Orange counties, California] <br />McMahan, S. Wells, M., Stokols, D., Phillips, K., Clitheroe, H. C., (2001, Summer). Assessing health promotion programming <br />in small businesses. American Journal of Health Studies (17.4% Response Rate)<br />
  17. 17. The Smallest of the Small (looking at the smallest businesses across the three surveys)<br />For planning, targeting, and marketing <br /> small distinctions make a big difference<br />
  18. 18. So what? There is promise . . .<br />Need to pay more attention to the very small (< 50) as these are majority of establishments<br />Essential to know who you are talking to:<br />Human Resources<br />CEO<br />Internal Wellness Champion<br />Significant variation by industry<br />Safety may be a lever<br />Humanitarian outcomes (rather than financial) may be more important *<br />Genuine concern for well-being of employees<br />Improve the quality of their life<br />Small businesses can do comprehensive programs<br />* Divine, R. L. (2005). Determinants of small business interest in offering a wellness program to their employees. Health Marketing Quarterly, 22(3), 43-58.<br />
  19. 19. Part 2<br /> Many Methods are Available<br />
  20. 20. Strategy is a critical<br />
  21. 21. Strategic Elements of the Launch Pad<br /> CEO/Mgr<br /> Engagement<br /> Organization<br /> (Policy)<br />Individual <br /> Health<br />External Support<br />& Community<br />Integration<br />Environment<br />Team/Support<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23. Strategy Matrix for Small Business Wellness Planning<br />© 2009; Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc.—www.organizationalwellness.com<br />
  24. 24. PART 3<br />SOLUTIONS AND BEST PRACTICES<br />
  25. 25. Solutions & Best Practices<br />START: FIT FRIENDLY (Walking Challenges)<br />TEXHEALTH HARRIS COUNTY 3-SHARE PLAN (Accessing Community Healthcare/Insurance)<br />WORKPLACE WELLNESS<br /> ‘LIVE UP TO YOUR FULL POTENTIAL’<br /> (HCSS-Heavy Construction Systems Specialists)<br />SMALL BUSINESS WELLNESS INITIATIVE<br /> (Evidence-Based Health Promotion)<br />
  26. 26. SCENARIO<br />PART 4<br />
  27. 27. Scenario<br />Harris County (towns, cities) identified as 1 of 20 areas in the country to receive a Phase I challenge grant (cooperative agreement) for $2 Million<br />8 counties/areas will move to Phase II (10 years; $5M)<br />Three years to demonstrate:<br />Can match the $2M with private & public monies<br />Deliver health promotion to 100 small businesses that have not received services (industry, diversity, health disparities)<br />50 of these with less than 50; 25 w/51 to 100; 25 w/ 100+<br />Demonstrate Insurers and SB CEO collaboration w/community<br />Programs in place for at least 1 year with demonstrable outcomes in four areas<br />Behavior change (health improvement)<br />Environmental and/or culture change<br />Policy changes are effective<br />CEO engagement<br />
  28. 28. References<br />Barbeau, E., Roelofs, C., Youngstrom, R., Sorensen, G., Stoddard, A., & LaMontagne, A. D. (2004). Assessment of occupational safety and health programs in small businesses. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 45, 371-379.<br />Brissette, I., Fisher, B., Spicer, D. A., & King, L. (2008). Worksite characteristics and environmental and policy supports for cardiovascular disease prevention in New York State. Preventing Chronic Disease, Public Health, Research, Practice, and Policy, 5(2), 1-12. <br />Divine, R. L. (2005). Determinants of small business interest in offering a wellness program to their employees. Health Marketing Quarterly, 22(3), 43-58.<br />Eakin, J. M., Cava, M., & Smith, T. F. (2001). From theory to practice: A determinants approach to workplace health promotion in small business. Health Promotion Practice, 2(2), 172-181.<br />Linnan, L., Bowling, M., Childress, J., Lindsay, G., Blakey, C., Pronk, S., Wieker, S., & Royall, P. (2008). Results of the 2004 national worksite health promotion survey. American Journal of Public Health, 98(1), 1-7.<br />Hunnicutt, D. Big steps for small businesses: The art of implementing a great wellness program in a small business setting. Absolute Advantage, The Workplace Wellness Magazine, 7(2), 3-44.<br />McMahan, S., Wells, M., Stokols, D., Phillips, K., & Clitheroe, H.C., Jr. (2001). Assessing health promotion programming in small business. American Journal of Health Studies, 17(3), 120-128.<br />McPeck, W., Ryan, M., & Chapman, L. S. (2009). Bringing wellness to the small employer, American Journal of Health Promotion, 23(5), 1-10.<br />Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM). (2009). Employee benefits: Examining employee benefits in a fiscally challenging economy. Retrieved INSERT DATE, from www.shrm.org/surveys.<br />

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