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GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS                                                                                                ...
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EDITORIAL                                                                          xvThe correct equipment used to its ful...
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Maritime atlas

  1. 1. KolkataKolkata
  2. 2. i LLOYD’S MARITIME ATLAS OF WORLD PORTS AND SHIPPING PLACES Publisher: Lloyd’s MIU An Informa business 69-77 Paul Street, London EC2A 4LQ, United Kingdom Tel: +44 (0) 20 7017 4482 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7017 5007 Email: enquiries@lloydsmiu.com www.lloydsmiu.com Cartography: Department of Maritime Studies University of Wales College of Cardiff, Cardiff CF1 3YP Editor: Paul Aldworth Deputy Editor: Jan Waters Map Preparation and Origination: Oxford Cartographers, Eynsham, Oxford OX29 4TP, Index Origination: Interactive Sciences Ltd, Gloucester Distance Tables: BP Shipping Marine Distance Tables Printed and Bound By: Emirates Printing Press, Dubai Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of this Atlas at the time of publication, Lloyd’s Marine Intelligence Unit does not accept responsibility for any errors or omissions or for any consequences arising therefrom. © Lloyd’s MIU 2007 A division of Informa UK All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. ISBN 978-184311-604-2 ISSN 0076-020XLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  3. 3. ii USER GUIDE GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX Port Facility Key This index helps you find ports and places according to their geographic P Petroleum Q Other Liquid Bulk Y Dry Bulk G General Cargo proximity. The index begins with 120 GEOGRAPHIC INDEX C Containers R Ro-Ro B Bunkers D Dry Dock T Towage A Airport (within 100km) London, and follows the coastlines of NETHERLANDS ANTILLES continued 154A St. Pierre 14 44 N 61 11 W La Trinite 14 48 N 61 00 W 155A Frederiksted 17 43 N 64 53 W 156A the world in a spiral, incorporating all Fuick Bay 12 03 N 65 50 W Y G T A DOMINICA G C R B T A Krause Lagoon islands and ending in Canada. The world map below shows the route this P Petroleum Q Other Liquid Bulk Y Dry Bulk G General Cargo index takes. 120 GEOGRAPHIC INDEX C Containers R Ro-Ro B Bunkers D Dry Dock T Towage Country Column 154, section D The geographical index gives detailed Georgetown 13 14 N 61 10 W Bequia Island 13 00 N 61 14 W information for all port facilities, as Place, and BARBADOS well as the latitude and longitude latitude/longitude Bridgetown 13 06 N 59 36 W P Q Y G C B D T A (latitude for North and South of the Speightstown 13 17 N 59 37 W ST. LUCIA 154D equator, and longitude for East and Port Facilities Vieux Fort 13 44 N 60 57 W P Q Y G C R B A West of the Greenwich Meridian Line). The geographical index is arranged in columns which are divided into four sections, marked A-D. The column/section reference is used by the alphabetical index to cross-refer to the correct listing in the geographical index (see below). Cross-reference 132 ALPHABETICAL INDEX ALPHABETICAL INDEX to the geographical Look up a place in the Alphabetical Index. This will show the 25A 24 Brevik index, column 154, 24D 167C 154D 24 58 61 Brevikfjord Bridgeport Bridgetown column and section reference to the listing in the geo index. It section D 170A 4D 57 17 Bridgewater Bridgwater also shows the page number to the map on which the place is 15D 17 Bridlington 3B 17 Bridport Place featured. Map page number The Course Of The Geographical IndexLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  4. 4. SYMBOLS and ABBREVIATIONS iii LLOYD’S MARITIME ATLAS OF WORLD PORTS AND SHIPPING PLACESLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  5. 5. iv GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICSLloyd’s MIU Consultancy has compiled the following global statistics, examining the movements of the merchant fleet anddetailing some findings by vessel category where significant. The data is sourced from the Lloyd’s MIU database. For anystatistical or research enquiries please email enquiries@lloydsmiu.comPort Calls By Region 2006 North America 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Container Dry Bulk Gas Cargo General Misc Passenger RoRo Tanker Central America / Caribbean 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Container Dry Bulk Gas Cargo General Misc Passenger RoRo Tanker South America 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 Container Dry Bulk Gas Cargo General Misc Passenger RoRo Tanker Calls By Region 2006 No.Calls 500,000 Far East 493,989 Far East 471,079 400,000 Med/Black Sea 295,818 Number of Calls 300,000 North America 119,567 200,000 Indian Ocean 115,610 South America 85,560 100,000 Central America/Caribbean 68,500 0 Australasia 40,006 Far East North Europe Med/BlackSea America Indian Ocean South America America/Carib Australasia West Africa North West Africa 24,228 C. Total 1,714,357Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  6. 6. © Lloyds MIUv Tanker Tanker Tanker RoRo RoRo RoRo Passenger Passenger Passenger Misc Misc Misc Australasia Indian Ocean Far East General General Cargo General Cargo Cargo Gas Gas Gas Dry Bulk Dry Bulk Dry Bulk www.lloydsmiu.com Tanker Container Tanker ContainerGLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS Container RoRo 50,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 0 Tanker RoRo 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Passenger RoRo Passenger Misc NorthhEuropee Passenger Nort Europ Misc West Africa General Cargo Misc General Med/BlackSea Cargo Gas General Cargo Gas Dry Bulk Gas Dry Bulk Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas Container Dry Bulk Container 50,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 0 Container 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0 90,000 60,000 30,000 120,000 0
  7. 7. vi GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICSCalls By Region and Vessel Type 2006 Australasia Central Far East Indian America Ocean Caribbean Container 7,719 12,557 159,036 27,228 Dry Bulk 12,202 3,828 55,868 16,734 Gas 880 1,745 11,153 3,695 General cargo 6,976 12,604 130,964 20,036 Miscellaneous 2,023 7,306 28,477 4,494 Passenger 2,201 12,257 11,498 1,812 Ro Ro 4,143 7,013 20,555 7,953 Tanker 3,828 9,314 74,319 32,923 Container Australasia Gas West Africa 2% South America 1% 6% North Central America/Caribbean Australasia Europe 4% West Africa 2% South America 1% 15% 6% Central America/Caribbean 4% North America Far North 6% Far East Europe East 26% 30% Med/BlackSea 47% 11% IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastAfr Indian Sub/Arab Gulf/East Africa ica IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastAfr Indian Sub /Arab Gulf/ 8% North America Eastica Africa 3% Med/BlackSea 9% 19% Dry Bulk West Africa Australasia Central General Cargo South America 1% 7% America/Caribbean Australasia 9% 2% 2% Central North West Africa America/Caribbean Europe South America 1% 3% 13% Far East 3% 32% North America North Far 13% East Europe IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastA 28% IndianSub/Arab Gulf/East Africa 36% Med/BlackSea frica 14% 9% IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastA IndianSub/Arab Gulf/ East Africa frica North America 4% 2% Med/BlackSea 21%Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  8. 8. GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS vii Mediterranean North North South West Black Sea America Europe America Africa 35,906 22,046 52,764 19,070 4,150 23,544 23,741 23,869 16,966 2,691 8,072 1,276 12,720 2,449 555 96,116 9,948 165,998 14,209 6,315 6,333 11,110 44,048 3,461 2,354 48,841 13,168 31,790 2,414 713 29,700 9,894 59,580 3,219 2,150 46,428 27,993 79,997 15,667 5,264 Miscellaneous Australasia West Africa 2% RoRo South America Central America/Caribbean 2% 3% 7% West Africa 1% Far Australasia Central America/Caribbean South America East 3% 5% 26% 2% North Far 14% Europe East 40% North IndianSub/Arab IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastAfr IndianSub/Arab Gulf/ IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastAfr Europe Gulf/East Africa East Africa ica ica 6% 41% North America 4% Med/BlackSea 10% 6% Med/BlackSea 21% North America 7% Passenger Central America/Caribbean West Africa Australasia 10% South America 1% 2% 2% Tanker North Far Europe East 9% Australasia 25% IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastA West Africa 1% Central IndianSub/Arab Gulf/ America/Caribbean frica East Africa 2% 1% 3% South America 5% North America Far North East 11% Med/BlackSea Europe 39% 25% 28% IndianSub/ArabGulf/EastA IndianSub/Arab Gulf/ North America East Africa frica 9% Med/BlackSea 11% 16%Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  9. 9. viii GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICSMarine Casualties throughout 2006 North America Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 South America Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Casualties By Region 2006 South America Other North America Middle East Indian Subcontinent Europe Australasia Asia Africa 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  10. 10. GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS ix Europe Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Missing/overdue MiscellaneousMachinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour disputeHull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Asia Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) Middle East Middle East 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Indian Ocean Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Africa Australasia Australasia Wrecked/stranded (aground) Wrecked/stranded (aground) Piracy Piracy Missing/overdue Missing/overdue Miscellaneous Miscellaneous Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, Machinery damage/failure (lost rudder, fouled propellor) fouled propellor) Labour dispute Labour dispute Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural Hull damage (holed, cracks, structural failure) failure) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Foundered (sunk, submerged) Fire/explosion Fire/explosion Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Contact (eg. Harbour wall) Collision (involving vessels) Collision (involving vessels) 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 5 10 15 20 25Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  11. 11. x GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICSThese charts identify the ownership, nationality and place of domicile of ownersof the world merchant fleet broken down by region.Ownership, nationality and place of domicile 2006 North America 7,723 70 Ships 7,719 Ships 60 50 Million DWT 40 30 20 10 0 Nationality Domicile Central America 5 1,247 Ships 1,234 Ships 4 Million DWT 3 2 1 0 Nationality Domicile South America 15 2,148 Ships 2,129 Ships Million DWT 10 5 0 Nationality DomicileLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  12. 12. GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS xi Europe 27,051 27,144 Ships Ships Far East 500 14,444 14,400 400 350 Ships Ships Million DWT 300 300 Million DWT 250 200 200 100 150 100 0 Nationality Domicile 50 0 Nationality Domicile Indian Subcontinent South East Asia 25 10,194 1,474 Ships 1,448 Ships 10,070 100 Ships Ships 20 Million DWT 15 75 Million DWT 10 50 5 25 0 Nationality Domicile 0 Nationality Domicile Australasia 707 Ships 703 Ships 4 3 Million DWT 2 1 0 Nationality DomicileLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  13. 13. xii EDITORIAL THE SHOREBASED USE OF AISWhilst only just over two years have passed since the carriage of AIS became mandatory for ships to which Ch V of SOLAS applies,things have moved a long way in the use of AIS ashore.Unfettered by the presentational restrictions that have necessarily been imposed on the display of AIS in ships, the more flexibleIALA guidelines for the presentation of AIS data has resulted in more imaginative solutions being offered by equipment providers.A significant number of VTS Centres now have AIS integrated into their traffic image displays. Some centres fuse AIS on a radardisplay but a growing majority fuse AIS and radar on a traffic image display that is backed by an Electronic Chart System (ECS).So what advantages has AIS brought to shore stations? Whilst a few centres have reported a reduction in VHF communications,the most significant benefit has been a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of tracking and confidence in the identification oftracks. When properly displayed, AIS can also improve the spatial awareness of VTS Operators through the presentation ofdynamic data such as heading and rate of turn, and through the accurate presentation of ship dimensions in the close passing sit-uations that are prevalent in the port environment (see example graphics). An AIS base station will generally see further than aco-located radar. This can offer the benefit of advanced warning for planning and pilot allocation. It can also provide the ability Example of AIS alone with radar video inhibitedto look into dock systems, under bridges and into channels where there would otherwise be a radar blind spot, but in suchcircumstances it should be used for vessel monitoring and traffic organisation rather than navigational assistance.To a degree AIS has been a victim of its own success. Its accelerated introduction resulted in the acceptance of the MinimumKeyboard Display (MKD) onboard ship; its tabular presentation is of much reduced benefit to the mariner compared with a graph-ical display. Although some vessels are fitted with a graphical display, the majority rely on MKD. With its poor interface for datainput, errors can be introduced that have the potential to confuse the unwary. Early teething problems were not unexpectedbut the situation is now much improved.Errors in the static message are now relatively infrequent and the introduction in some VTS Centres of comparisons betweendata sources to validate AIS identity fields will help reduce this still further. Voyage related messages rely on operator update andare more prone to errors - perhaps due to the MKD, but arguably such errors impact little on navigational safety. Errors in thedynamic message are becoming less and less frequent with the most common being the transmission of an offset heading due tothe misalignment of the gyro input signal with the AIS transponder. Whilst anecdotal reports suggest the incidence of erroneousLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  14. 14. EDITORIAL xiii Examples with radar video overlaid with AISAIS messages are still as high as 30%, VTS Centres with accurate records indicate that the incidence of AIS errors of navigation-al significance that are not immediately corrected is probably nearer 1% or less.Clearly any level of error is unacceptable if AIS is used as the sole source of information and for this reason AIS needs to bevalidated in the port environment if it is to be used for the provision of a navigational assistance service, or in the organisation oftraffic where it involves the management of navigational safety. There are many reasons why a VTS Centre would not considerdecommissioning existing radars and placing reliance for coverage solely on AIS at this early stage. However, AIS may allow a VTSto extend its area of influence and there are examples of AIS being introduced for non-SOLAS vessels in the inland and riverenvironment where radar coverage may be impractical.The messaging features of AIS are not widely used at present but early examples include the transmission of tidal data and secu-rity related information. As users become more familiar with the system and its capabilities, it is likely that AIS messaging will beused more widely for the dissemination of routine information that must otherwise be passed by voice over VHF.In sum, the use of AIS ashore has provided a quantum enhancement of VTS capability. Whilst it may extend the horizon and theability to monitor traffic at extended ranges or in confined areas, AIS should be seen as another sensor. Properly correlated, AISprovides the maritime world with the sort of additional track data, and more, that the air world has enjoyed for decades.Barry GoldmanIHMA reprepresentative at IALAand VTS Manager, PLA Sponsored byLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  15. 15. xiv EDITORIAL A SEAMAN’S PERSPECTIVE - THE ROLE OF AIS ON THE BRIDGE AT SEALife at sea has changed immeasurably over recent years, and the advances in equipment have come thick andfast. This technological progress has been relentless, touching every facet of the ship-to-shore relationship,and spanning almost every shipboard activity.Many initiatives have made routine tasks simpler, while others have changed forever the way watch-keepersoperate and the very safety and processes of navigation itself.One of the most fundamental changes has been the introduction of Automatic Identification Systems (AIS)for vessels. AIS brings to the seafarer many benefits, principal amongst these is the automatic and immedi-ate provision of vessel identity, thereby facilitating rapid radio communication where necessary, no longer donameless ships simply pass in the night.There are other advantages of AIS over existing navigation equipment, and the systems provide precise nav-igational advice over a wide geographical coverage. AIS offers real-time maneuvering data and a high level oftraffic image accuracy, and all without the effect of the weather on tracking performance, and with theabsence of “radar shadow” areas. Advantages that provide a real boost to the officers on the bridge, as theyno longer struggle to adjust sets for rain and sea clutter.AIS has changed not just the reactions and procedures of the navigators using it, but has affected the provi-sion of assistance to them – whether from other vessels or port Vessel Traffic Services (VTS) operators. Theprovision of navigation data is now a complete closed loop, with all parties provided with the informationthey need, when they need it.While there are numerous benefits gained from the new equipment, we must never become complacent, andmust always remember that professional navigators still have work to do – it’s not all just pressing buttonsand relying solely on the machine to do all the work.There are naturally some drawbacks to the system, one major concern being that some operators maybecome overly dependent on AIS, and therefore, may treat the system as a sole or primary means for vesselidentification. This can be a fatal mistake, especially when one considers that AIS has the same vulnerabilitiesas VHF-FM, and has a propensity to cull transmissions when it reaches its saturation point (maximum num-ber of transmission receipts), so just when you need it most, in heavy traffic, it may not be providing the fullpicture – the old lesson remains, and we must never rely on scanty information.Other weaknesses to be guarded against include poor installation, incorrect data, poor displays (MKDs), andofficers not switching units on/off as appropriate.There are also important issues related to the development of electronic aids to navigation, and The NauticalInstitute has long stressed the difficulties of dealing with technology, such as AIS, before it is fully developedand realised. We have also stressed the absolute need for proper training long before crews are expectedto use such equipment.Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  16. 16. EDITORIAL xvThe correct equipment used to its full potential by fully trained individuals can have a positive effect on thepassage planning, voyage monitoring and safe conduct of the vessel. Small problems though, can quicklybecome very big problems if the equipment is not used properly and if it is not maintained correctly.Equipment needs always to reflect the needs not just of the company, and the vessel – but also the peopleusing it. So providers must stay aware of the operational demands, the design, ergonomics and must ensurethat any equipment is truly fit-for-purpose.In general,The Nautical Institute has found that mariners really do like AIS, as it improves situational aware-ness and provides positive and effective identification of targets. The days of the “ship on my port bow” VHFchatter are now over, and this is significant progress.The Nautical Institutes Technical Committee has long been involved in the collation of reports from faultyAIS units, and the aim of this initiative has been to identify problems, improve installation and ultimately toimprove the technology through design and regulation. AIS users are requested to report any AIS problemsto ais@nautinst.orgAs the professional body for those in command of seagoing craft, the Nautical Institute supports, recognisesand embraces the importance of advances such as AIS, we also applaud the efforts of Lloyd’s MIU in work-ing to bring this system to its full potential, and thank them for giving us this chance to put the views of ourmembers, the seafarers, across.For more details of the work of the Nautical Institute, or to enquire about membership please visit our web-site, www.nautinst.orgSteven JonesProfessional Development ManagerThe Nautical InstituteLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  17. 17. xvi CONTENTSPAGE PAGE INSIDE FRONT COVER 31 Gulf of Naples WORLD DISTANCE TABLE 31 Gulf of Tunis 31 Gulf of Venice 32 Aegean SeaII USER GUIDE Inset: Piraeus 33 Eastern MediterraneanIII SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS 34 Africa and the Middle East Inset: Azores 36 West AfricaIV GLOBAL MARITIME STATISTICS 37 Persian Gulf 38 South AsiaXII INDEX TO MAPS Inset: Hong Kong 40 IndiaXIII EDITORIAL - SHORE-BASED AIS 41 Gulf of Thailand 42 Malaysia, Indonesia Insets:XIV EDITORIAL - AIS AT SEA Singapore, Brunei1 FOREWORD 44 Philippines 45 Japan2 MAPS 46 China, Korea 48 Australasia and Pacific Islands 50 North America69 GEOGRAPHICAL INDEX 52 Pacific Northwest 53 Southern California131 ALPHABETICAL INDEX 54 Eastern United States Inset: Bermuda 56 Great Lakes2 INDEX MAP 57 Gulf of St. Lawrence 58 Eastern Seaboard4 WEATHER HAZARDS AT SEA Inset: New York 59 Central America6 INTERNATIONAL LOAD LINE ZONES 60 Caribbean Sea 62 South America 64 River Plate, Southern BrazilOCEAN MAPS 65 Kiel Canal 66 Rhine-Main-Danube Canal8 North Atlantic Ocean 67 Suez Canal10 Atlantic and Indian Oceans 68 Panama Canal12 Pacific Ocean 69 Geographical Index14 Arctic 134 Alphabetical Index15 AntarcticREGIONAL MAPS16 United Kingdom and Ireland Insets: Thames Humber, Trent Tyne, Tees FACT PANELS Clyde18 English Channel19 North Sea 18 Seine 57 St. Lawrence20 Northern Europe 23 Rhine Seaway22 Belgium, Netherlands and Germany 23 Western Scheldt 62 Amazon24 Southern Scandinavia 25 Lake Vanern 64 River Parana26 Baltic Sea 26 Saimaa Canal 65 Kiel Canal27 Black Sea, Caspian Sea 27 Volga, Don 66 Rhine-Main-Danube28 Mediterranean Sea 38 Yangtze Canal30 Bay of Biscay (Chiang Jiang) 67 Suez Canal30 Strait of Gibraltar 56 Great Lakes 68 Panama Canal31 Northern MediterraneanLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU
  18. 18. FOREWORD 1 LLOYD’S MARITIME ATLAS OF WORLD PORTS AND SHIPPING PLACESThis is the 24th edition of the Lloyd’s Maritime Atlas, the premier reference guide to the world’s ports and shippingplaces.Fully updated and revised to reflect changes in port and country names and international borders, the latest edition isagain supplemented with a FREE CD Rom, which gives the book enhanced portability. In this edition, 225 port placeshave been added to the geographical index.The Atlas provides precise latitude and longitude co-ordinates, details of the main canals and river systems, weatherconditions, load line zones, international airports, plus details on principal road and rail connections. In addition, theAtlas features world and regional marine distance tables, a comprehensive user guide and detailed statistics on com-mercial vessel movements, characteristics and casualties.Featuring world maps, regional maps and larger scale maps for the busiest shipping areas, the book also encompassesa unique indexing system which allows users to search for ports on both a geographical and alphabetical basis.The useof full colour throughout adds to the user friendliness of the Atlas.The Atlas is designed to be used in conjunction with the Lloyd’s List Ports of the World annual publication. By crossreferencing between the two books, users can glean full details on cargo-handling facilities and services provided at allthe major ports and shipping centres across the globe.As a group, Lloyd’s MIU is always looking for ways in which its products and services can be improved and we wel-come any comments and suggestions that you may have concerning this Atlas or any of our other publications.To con-tact us, please send an e-mail to enquiries@lloydsmiu.comJohn FosseyEditorial DirectorLloyd’s Marine Intelligence Unitwww.lloydsmiu.comLloyds and the crest are the registered trademarks of the Society incorporated by the Lloyds Act 1871 by the name of LloydsLloyd’s Maritime Atlas www.lloydsmiu.com © Lloyds MIU

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