Licensing Act 2003The Act was brought in to consolidate all other previouslicensing regimes such as public entertainmentli...
Human Rights Act 1998Right to privacy, right to live, exist, right to have a family, to ownproperty, free speech, safety f...
Privacy lawRegulation or statute that protects a person’sright to be left alone, and governs collection,storage, and relea...
Libel LawEnglish law allows actions for libel to be broughtin the high court for any published statementswhich are alleged...
Race Relations Act 1976An Act to make fresh provision with respect todiscrimination on racial grounds and relationsbetween...
Copyright & Intellectual Property LawRefers to any creative work or inventionconsidered to be the property of its creator....
Broadcasting ActThis is a law of the British Parliament, oftenregarded by both its supporters and its critics asa quintess...
Obscene Publications ActThis law has governed what can be published orreleased in England and Wales. The classicdefinition...
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Legislation

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Legislation

  1. 1. Licensing Act 2003The Act was brought in to consolidate all other previouslicensing regimes such as public entertainmentlicences, late night refreshment and Justices alcohollicences and Private Members Clubs and has nowsuperseded the legislation governing them. Under theAct, Licensing Authorities, must carry out theirfunctions with a view to promoting the four licensingobjectives.
  2. 2. Human Rights Act 1998Right to privacy, right to live, exist, right to have a family, to ownproperty, free speech, safety from violence, equality of both males andfemales; women’s rights, fair trial, to be innocent until proven guilty, to be acitizen of a country, the right to express his or her sexual orientation, tovote, to seek asylum if a country treats you badly, to think freely, to believeand practice the religion a person wants to peacefully protest (speak against)a government or group, health care (medical care), education, tocommunicate through a language, not be forced into marriage, the right tolove and the right to work.
  3. 3. Privacy lawRegulation or statute that protects a person’sright to be left alone, and governs collection,storage, and release of his or her financial,medical, and other personal information.
  4. 4. Libel LawEnglish law allows actions for libel to be broughtin the high court for any published statementswhich are alleged to defame a named oridentifiable individual (or individuals) in amanner which causes them loss in their trade orprofession, or causes a reasonable person tothink worse of him, her or them.
  5. 5. Race Relations Act 1976An Act to make fresh provision with respect todiscrimination on racial grounds and relationsbetween people of different racial groups. Itemsthat are covered are; discrimination on thegrounds of race, colour, nationality, ethnic andnational origin in the fields of employment, theprovision of goods and services, education andpublic functions.
  6. 6. Copyright & Intellectual Property LawRefers to any creative work or inventionconsidered to be the property of its creator.Often recognised and protected under thecorresponding fields of law. Owners are grantedcertain exclusive rights, such as the ability topublish to various markets, license themanufacture and distribution of inventions, andsue in case of unlawful or deceptive copying.
  7. 7. Broadcasting ActThis is a law of the British Parliament, oftenregarded by both its supporters and its critics asa quintessential example of Thatcherism. Theaim of the Act was to reform the entire structureof British broadcasting; British television, inparticular, had earlier been described byMargaret Thatcher as the last bastion ofrestrictive practices. It governs what can beshown on TV.
  8. 8. Obscene Publications ActThis law has governed what can be published orreleased in England and Wales. The classicdefinition of criminal obscenity is if it “tends todeprave and corrupt”

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