Hamilton Gray Park & Agnes Steele

2,462 views

Published on

PIONEER HISTORY OF
Hamilton Gray Park (1826 – 1912) &
Agnes Steele (1826 – 1896)

Published in: Spiritual, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,462
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Hamilton Gray Park & Agnes Steele

  1. 1. PIONEER HISTORY OF Hamilton Gray Park (1826 – 1912) & Agnes Steele (1826 – 1896) Hamilton Gray Park Born: 25 Nov 1826 at Newtownstewart, Tyron, Ireland Baptized: Nov 1840 Died: 1 May 1912 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah (Some family records show his death and burial was in Tooele, Utah) MARRIED: About 1844 Hamilton Gray Park married Agness Steele at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland Agnes Steele Born: 15 Sep 1823, Kilburnie, Ayrshire, Scotland Baptized: 5 Jul 1842 Died: 21 Feb 1896 at Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., Utah Hamilton Gray Park is the third (3) son of Samuel Park Sr and Isabella Gray who were Married: about 1820 at Newtownstewart or Douglas Bridge, Tyron, Ireland His father, Samuel Park, Sr., died April 1833 at Newtownstewart , Tyron, Ireland OR Kilburnie, Ayrshire, Scotland. Some time during 1832 early 1933 the family moved to Kilburnie, Ayrshire, Scotland On Nov. 1840 Hamilton Gray Park was baptized a member of the LDS Church. Some records show H. G. Park baptized 26 Dec 1841 On 6 Jul 1842 Agnes Steele was baptized a member of the LDS Church. In about 1844 Hamilton Gray Park married Agness Steele at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland They had four children while living in Scotland:
  2. 2. 1- Janette "Jessie" Alexander /Park/ Born; 1844 Kilburnie, Ayrs, Scotland Died: 20 Sep 1867 Fillmore, Millard, Utah 2- Hamilton Gray /Park/ Born: 10 Mar 1845 Died: 10 Aug 1845 Kilburnie, Ayrs ,Scotland 3- Isabella Gray /Park/ Born: 23 Feb 1848 Kilburnie, Ayrs, Scotland Died: 25 Jun 1932 Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah 4- Marion Martha /Park/ Born: 1849 Kilburnie, Ayrs, Scotland Died: Prob 1851 Possibly in St. Louis, Mo. During immigration to Utah and they were Sealed on 14 Mar 1856 at Endowment House, SLC, Utah. During 1850 Hamilton Gray Park and his family emigrated to SLC, Utah aboard the LDS chartered ship “North Atlantic”. Along with wife Agnes Steele Park and three (3) children; Jessie, Isabella and Marian M. Park http://mormonmigration.lib.byu.edu/Search/showDetails/db:MM_MII/t:voyage/id:306/keywords:1850+North+Atlantic LDS Emigration 4 Sep 1850, Departure: Liverpool, England, Ship “North Atlantic” 1 Nov 1850, Arrival: New Orleans, Louisiana It was not unusual for LDS member to stay in the Midwest, a year or so, before continuing on to SLC 10 Jun 1852 , Depart Kanesville, Iowa, Joseph Outhouse Co 6 Sep 1852, Arrival: SLC, Utah NORTH ATLANIC” Passenger List PARK, Hamilton <1824> North Atlantic 1850 Age: 26 Origin: Kilburne Occ: Miner Note: BMR, p. 70; Customs List, p. 3A PARK, Agnes S. <1824> North Atlantic 1850 Age: 26 Origin: Kilburne PARK, Jessie <1844> North Atlantic 1850 Age: 6 Origin: Kilburne PARK, Isabella <1848> North Atlantic 1850 Age: 2 Origin: Kilburne PARK, Marian M. <1849> North Atlantic 1850 Age: 1 Origin: Kilburne Note:Age:"8 months" (BMR) ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ship: North Atlantic 4 Sep 1850, Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 357 Church Leader: David Sudworth 1 Nov 1850, Port of Arrival: New Orleans, Louisiana North Atlantic, 357 souls. On Wednesday morning, September 4th, 1850, the ship North Atlantic sailed from Liverpool, carrying three hundred and fifty-seven Saints, including children, under the presidency of Elder David Sudworth. and Hamilton G. Park. . Their destination is the Great Salt Lake Valley, via New Orleans, St. Louis, and Council Bluffs. . . ." “On the voyage he (Hamilton G. Park) had actual charge of the Saints on board as the president appointed over the company, David Sudworth, was seriously ill.” “LATTER-DAY SAINT - “BIOGRAPHICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA”” After a rather lengthy, but safe and pleasant passage, the company arrived in New Orleans, November 1st 1850 There were two deaths on board, namely, Betty Hulme, aged sixty-three, and Katren Bonner, aged three years. One was added to the Church by baptism during the voyage, namely, Ann Burton, from Lincolnshire, England; she was baptized September 15th. Two infants were born on the ocean.
  3. 3. DEPART NEW ORLEANS From New Orleans the emigrants continued their journey up the Mississippi River to St. Louis, Missouri. Daughter, Marion Martha Park, may have died sometime and somewhere between New Orleans and Iowa. To SLC, UTAH They probably stayed in St. Louis or Iowa from their arrival in (early 1851 until departure in June 1852) http://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/companyDetail?lang=eng&companyId=229 Departure Post Departure Date Company Captain - Company Name or No. Number of People Wagons Arrival Date Roster Kanesville, Iowa About 10- Jun-1852 Joseph Outhouse 230 50 6-Sep- 1852 J.H. Supp. after 31 Dec 1852, p. 19-24*; D.N. Vol 2, p. 90 1852 4th Company, Joseph Outhouse, Capt., Hamilton G Park and 8 persons Joseph Outhouse Company (1852) http://history.lds.org/overlandtravels/pioneerDetail?lang=eng&pioneerId=10964 Joseph Outhouse Company (1852) Departure: 10 June 1852 from Kanesville, Iowa Arrival in Salt Lake Valley: 6 September 1852 Company Information: Joseph Outhouse Co. 50 individuals [50 wagons] were in the company when it began its journey from the outfitting post at Kanesville, Iowa (present day Council Bluffs). From the list of individuals known to have traveled in this company. I do not know who the 8 people traveling with Hamilton Gray Park were, but the following are listed with the Joseph Outhouse Co. (on the internet pioneer site). Park, Hamilton Gray (26) Park, Agnes Steele (28) Park, Janette Alexander (6) Park, Isabella Gray (4) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  4. 4. Gardner, Nathan Hale, [Biographical sketch of Ann Rogers Snow] 1978, 10-11. Early in June 1852 we were organized into a company of 50 with Bro. Joseph Outhouse as Captain of the company. There was a captain for every ten wagons. We crossed the Elkhorn River and started out on our long journey with full faith that the Lord would guide us through. “In this age of steam and electricity one can scarcely imagine that anyone could be all day going 10 or 15 miles, but the Saints traveled this way in early days, camping where we could find feed and water. When a wagon needed repairing they would stop a day and the women would wash and cook and prepare to continue the journey. 3 or 4 weeks after we started there was a little trouble arose in the company and part of the company went on and we were left with 10 wagons and we came all the way with this small company with Bro. Page as our Captain. “When we came near Ft. Laramie the Sioux Indians frequently visited our camp. They were well dressed in their buckskin suits which were all trimmed with beads. One day there were several rode past our train and tried to stampede our cattle, but we were blessed and the cattle were not frightened. Thus the Indians were unable to carry out their designs. “Sometimes there was a herd of Buffalo or Antelope skipping over the plains, and occasionally one was killed and then we would have fresh meat, which was a great treat as our supplies were scant. “The weather was warm until we reached Sweetwater, when it was very cold and froze hard. Just before we came to Green River we saw about one hundred Snake Indians, but they turned off the road and did not molest us. We crossed the Green River and in a few days reached our destination, tired and weary from our long journey, some of us having walked half of the way. We were truly glad and thankful to rest”. Ann R. Snow ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Wood, Lyman Stephen, Autobiographical sketch 1901, 55-58. The guards or sentinels were placed along outside the line of wagons, with orders to walk their beat first one way then the other until they would meet a fellow guard and report to him of any occurence note worthy. It was orders for guard no 1 to cry out the time of night, every half hour, then no 2 and no 3 and so on until the report that all was well went the entire length of the line every half hour. Each successive guard repeating what the former one had reported. The writer of this happened to be near guard quarters where sentinel no 1 was placed and close to sentinel no 2 who passing on his beat came near a wagon where the owner and his family were supposed to be sleeping as most all the wagons were slept in, one nearby was occupied by a man by the name of Gates, who it seems at this particular moment was indulging in a very fierce dispute with his wife, sentinel no 1 called the time like this, half past ten o, clock and all is well, sentinel no 2 who was very near to Mr. Gates wagon, heard the conversation in there, cried out, half past 10 o, clock, and all is well, "except Gates and his wife are quarreling like hell. Sentinel no 3 reported and so on all down the line which was nearly a mile in length. This publicity was heard by the entire camp who were not already asleep, and didn't hear the cries of the sentinels. This affair caused a considerable amount of amusement for the next few days. Our camp was large there being something over six hundred wagons and when strung out in line of march would reach something like three or four miles. While traveling up the Platt[e] river when it was thought feasible, in many places we formed two lines for better protection from assault by the Indians. Our travel was necessarily very slow many days not covering more than from five to ten miles. One of the greatest difficulties we had to contend with, was the great scarcity of wood, we were compelled to resort to the use of the dried droppings of the buffalo, (that had recently passed along) commonly called, "Buffa[lo] chips"
  5. 5. We encountered many very severe electrical storms, thunder and such sharp lightning, every few days at which time the "buffa[lo] chips" became so wet, we had great difficulty in starting fires to cook our food. It was truly a novel as well as an amusing sight many times when our captain would give orders for all to prepare for camping for the night. To see women and children leaving their wagons, scattering in every direction to gather the indispensable buffalo chips, some getting baskets full and some sacks full. Some of the women would gather their aprons full, some in their arms, as long as they could be piled on, many times holding the last piece in place with their chin. Nothing of special importance transpiring other than the usual routine. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It is interesting to note that in 1855 Hamilton G. Park provided “Surity” for his sister and family (Mary Jane Park Draney) with PEF. Mary Jane Park Draney with family and mother, who emigrated in 1856 aboard Enoch Train and were with the 2nd Handcart Co. In Perpetual Emigration Fund (Book)-Microfilm 25686 “1855 Park, Hamilton G. “Surety for” John Dreaney and Mary Jane” ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Park, Hamilton G, 1850, North Atlantic, Ship roster on microfilm(s) 200165 25690 Park Hamilton G. and 8 persons, 1852, Joseph Outhouse, Deseret News Vol 2 P 90 Sept – 18 – 1852 microfilm 0026586 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Park, Hamilton G., 1854, 27, LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, Page 684 Microfilm 410869 LATTER-DAY SAINT “BIOGRAPHICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA” A Compilation of Biographical Sketches of Prominent Men and Women in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints BY: Andrew Jenson, Assistant Church Historian, VOLUME I Published by the Andrew Jenson History Company, and Printed by The Deseret News, Salt Lake City, Utah – 1901 Pages 684 - 685 Park, Hamilton Gray, second counselor in the presidency of the High Priests’ quorum of the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, is a son of Samuel Park and Isabella Gray, and was born Nov. 25, 1826. He received the fullness of the gospel at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, where he as baptized in November, 1840. Soon after baptism he was ordained to the office of a Teacher, three months later to that of a Priest and afterwards to that of an Elder. He was also appointed to preside over the Kilbirnie branch of the Church, a position which he occupied until he emigrated to Utah, together with a company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool, England in the ship “North Atlantic”, Sept. 4, 1854. On the voyage he had actual charge of the Saints on board as the president appointed over the company, David Sudworth, was seriously ill. Two years after his arrival in Utah, Elder Park entered the service of Pres. Brigham Young and was his business manager most of the time from 1852 till May 1869, during which time he was closely connected with most of the enterprises of that master mind in developing the resources of the country. Thus he assisted in opening up canyons north, east and west of the city, building flouring and saw-mills, constructing the first overland telegraph line spanning the continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific, etc.
  6. 6. In the spring of 1869 he was called on a mission to Great Britain; he left home in May and arrived in Liverpool, England June 9th of that year; labored a few months as a traveling Elder in Scotland and subsequently presided over the Glasgow conference, including the whole of Scotland. He returned home in charge of a large company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool July 12, 1871, and arrived in Salt Lake City Aug. 4th following. Later in 1871 he was appointed to act as second counselor to Bishop Edwin D. Woolley, in the 13th Ward, which position he filled till 1876, when being on a second mission to Great Britain, he resigned. At the request of Pres. Brigham Young he became business manager for his son Jos. A. Young, in which position he combined farming, coal-mining, railroading, etc. Being called on another mission to Great Britain, he left home in October and arrived in Liverpool, England, Nov. 12 1875. He succeeded Elder David McKenzie in the presidency of the Scotch mission and returned home in charge of another company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool Sept, 19th and arrived in Salt Lake City Oct. 6, 1877. Since his return from his last mission he has been in the employ of Z.C.M.I. In his missionary experience abroad, Elder Park has witnessed many marvelous manifestations of the power of God in the healing of the sick, the rebuking of evil spirits, and has even seen the dead raised under the administrations of the Elders. At home he has been an active laborer in the Ward Y.M.M.I.A. and Sunday school. For eight years he labored as a home missionary in the Salt Lake Stake, where he also, by appointment of the late Pres. Joseph Young, labored for a number of years among the mass quorums of Seventies as their president. From 1882 to 1891 he acted as clerk of the Thirteenth Ward. When the Bishopric of the 13th Ward was reorganized; after the death of Bishop Millen Atwood, in 1891, Hamilton G. Park was ordained a High Priest by Pres. Joseph F. Smith and set apart as fist counselor to Bishop Nelson A. Empey, which position he held for nine years, or until 1900, when he was called to the position of second counselor in the presidency of the High Priests quorum in the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, which office he still holds. Elder Park is one of Zion’s most faithful and trustworthy sons; his zeal and integrity in the interest of God’s cause has been continuous and unfaltering, and his influence for good has been felt in every locality where he has resided, and on all his missions, both at home and abroad. As an employee for many years in Z.C.M.I., he has been and is at the present time entrusted with some of the most responsible duties of a financial nature in that institution. A few years ago he changed his place of residence from the 13th to the 18th Ward. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  7. 7. PAGE 684
  8. 8. http://www.thisistheplace.org/farm/farm.html The Brigham Young Farm House at This Is The Place Heritage Park is the original structure that was built in 1863 on the Mormon leader’s 823-acre farm in what is now the Sugarhouse area of the Salt Lake Valley (about 700 East and 2300 South). Brigham Young used the farm for experimental agriculture to determine which crops and livestock would survive and thrive in the unfamiliar climate conditions of Utah. Crops ranged from the familiar, such as alfalfa, strawberries and cauliflower to the exotic, like Chinese sugar cane and chufa nut (an edible root from Africa). About 25 acres of mulberry trees were imported to feed imported silkworms in what eventually was a futile attempt to produce silk domestically in Deseret. The farm also produced most of the dairy products, vegetables and grains used by the Young families. The farming operation was managed by Hamilton Gray Park, but the home and dairy were run by several of Brigham’s wives. They managed the household and supervised the daily activities there, from cooking to laundry to spinning wool and other aspects of pioneer life. In addition to the wives and their children, the household included girls hired to help and, at least for meals, the large number of farmhands needed to produce crops on such a large acreage. Though he never lived in the house, Brigham visited often. He entertained visiting dignitaries and held dances and other social events there. His daughter, Clarissa, recalled that her father especially enjoyed showing off the farm to visitors from the East. The house had a couple of unusual features for its time. A three-sided wooden trough carried cool water from a spring near the house into a basement tank so fresh water did not have to be carried in buckets from a well each day as was necessary in most pioneer homes. And while the second floor was primarily bedroom space, one large room was kept as a dance hall.
  9. 9. http://search.ldslibrary.com/search/text Hamilton Gray Searching 1 to 5 of 5 for Hamilton Gray park in LDS Library PREV | NEXT LDS Authors , Jenson Andrew, Church Chronology (A. Jenson), Church Chronology , 1912 , May 1 1912 (Wednesday) Hamilton Gray Park, a Utah pioneer of 1854 and a prominent Church veteran, and C.A. Sperry, a prominent Church worker, of Nephi, Utah, died in Salt Lake City. Park, Hamilton Gray Park Hamilton Gray LDS Biographical Encyclopedia, Andrew Jenson, Vol. 1 Park, Hamilton Gray, second counselor in the presidency of the High Priests' quorum of the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, is a son of Samuel Park and Isabella Gray, and was born Nov. 25, 1826. He received the fulness of the gospel at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, where he was baptized in November, 1840. Soon after his baptism he was ordained to the office of a Teacher, three months later to that of a Priest and afterwards to that of an Elder. He was also appointe... Improvement Era 1904 Public Workers. Hamilton Gray Park. Among the public workers who stand prominent in the history of the business and commercial development of our state, is the name of Hamilton Gray Park, who came to Utah in 1854, and two years thereafter entered the service of President Brigham Young as his business manager, which position he retained from that time until May, 1869. In all these years he was closely connected with the leading business enterprises that were inaugurated and carried on by that great pioneer, in developing the resources of the new commonwealth. Among these may be mentioned the opening up of canyons, north, east and west of Salt Lake City, and the establishment of flouring and saw mills, one of the earliest necessities of the state. Another important enterprise was the contract for the first overland telegraph line, spanning the continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in which, under President Young, he took a leading part in the division built in the Rocky mountain region. Hamilton G. Park was born Nov. 25, 1826, in Scotland, he received the Gospel, and was later baptized at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, in Nov., 1840. He is the son of Samuel Park and Isabella Gray. Soon after his baptism, he was ordained to the office of a teacher, and some three months thereafter to that of a priest, and in due time to that of an elder, taking a leading part in Church affairs in his native land. He was appointed to preside over the Kilbirnie branch of the Church, which position he retained until Sept. 4, 1854, when, together with a company of saints, he sailed from Liverpool in the ship North Atlantic. Owing to the illness of the president, who had been appointed to take charge of the company of saints that emigrated with him, he became the president in charge during the voyage.
  10. 10. In the spring of 1869, he was called on a mission to Great Britain, arriving in Liverpool on the 9th of June, that year, and laboring as a traveling elder in Scotland for a few months. He was subsequently appointed to preside over the Glasgow conference, which at that time included the whole of Scotland. After finishing his mission, he sailed from Liverpool on the 12th of July, 1871, in charge of a large company of saints, arriving in Salt Lake City on the 4th of August. Soon after his return, he was appointed to act as second counselor to Bishop Edwin D. Woolley, in the Thirteenth Ward, which position he filled until 1876, when he resigned to fill a second mission to Great Britain. On this mission, he arrived at Liverpool on the 12th of November, 1875, succeeding Elder David McKenzie in the presidency of the Scotch Mission, returning from Liverpool on Sept. 19, 1877, again in charge of another company of saints. Improvement Era 1904 Hamilton G. Park was born Nov. 25, 1826, in Scotland, he received the Gospel, and was later baptized at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, in Nov., 1840. He is the son of Samuel Park and Isabella Gray. Soon after his baptism, he was ordained to the office of a teacher, and some three months thereafter to that of a priest, and in due time to that of an elder, taking a leading part in Church affairs in his native land. He was appointed to preside over the Kilbirnie branc... When returning from two different missions, Hamilton Gray Park presided over the two groups of LDS emigrants on their way to Utah. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ship: Colorado Date of Departure: 12 Jul 1871,Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 146, Church Leader: Hamilton G. Park Date of Arrival: 25 Jul 1871Port of Arrival: New York, New York Date of Arrival: 4 Aug 1871 at Salt Lake City ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ship: Wisconsin Date of Departure: 19 Sep 1877, Port of Departure: Liverpool, England LDS Immigrants: 482, Church Leader: Hamilton G. Park Date of Arrival: 29 Sep 1877, Port of Arrival: New York, New York Date of Arrival: 6 Oct 1877 at Salt Lake City CROSSING THE ATLANTIC ON STEAMSHIPS AND RAILROAD TRAVEL FROM NEW YORK TO SALT LAKE CITY SIGNIFANTLY CHANGED THE TIME AND COMFORT LEVEL OF THE LDS IMMIGRANTS.
  11. 11. Hamilton Gray Home >> LDS Authors >> Group Biographies Autobiographies and Diaries >> LDS Biographical Encyclopedia >> LDS Biographical Encyclopedia v1 (A. Jenson) >> Biographies >> Park Hamilton Gray Park Hamilton Gray Park, Hamilton Gray, second counselor in the presidency of the High Priests' quorum of the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, is a son of Samuel Park and Isabella Gray, and was born Nov. 25, 1826. He received the fulness of the gospel at Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland, where he was baptized in November, 1840. Soon after his baptism he was ordained to the office of a Teacher, three months later to that of a Priest and afterwards to that of an Elder. He was also appointed to preside over the Klbirnie branch of the Church, a position which he occupied until he emigrated to Utah, together with a company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool, England, in the ship "North Atlantic," Sept. 4, 1854. On the voyage he had actual charge of the Saints on board, as the president appointed over the company, David Sudworth, was seriously ill. Two years after his arrival in Utah Elder Park entered the service of Pres. Brigham Young and was his [p.669] business manager most of the time from 1852 till May, 1869, during which time he was closely connected with most of the enterprises of that master mind in developing the resources of the country. Thus he assisted in opening up canyons north, east and west of the city, building flouring and saw-mills, constructing the first overland telegraph line spanning the continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific, etc. In the spring of 1869 he was called on a mission to Great Britain; he left home in May and arrived in Liverpool, England, June 9th of that year; labored a few months as a traveling Elder in Scotland and subsequently presided over the Glasgow conference, including the whole of Scotland. He returned home in charge of a large company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool July 12, 1871, and arrived in Salt Lake City Aug. 4th following. Later in 1871 he was appointed to act as second counselor to Bishop Edwin D. Woolley, in the 13th Ward, which position he filled till 1876, when, being on a second mission to Great Britain, he resigned. At the request of Pres. Brigham Young he became business manager for his son Jos. A. Young, in which position he combined farming, coal-mining, railroading, etc. Being called on another mission to Great Britain, he left home in October and arrived in Liverpool, England, Nov. 12, 1875. He succeeded Elder David McKenzie in the presidency of the Scotch mission, and returned home in charge of another company of Saints, which sailed from Liverpool Sept. 19th and arrived in Salt Lake City Oct. 6, 1877. Since his return from his last mission he has been in the employ of Z. C. M. I. In his missionary experience abroad Elder Park has witnessed many marvelous manifestations of the power of God in the healing of the sick, the rebuking of evil spirits, and has even seen the dead raised under the administrations of the Elders. At home he has been an active laborer in the Ward Y. M. M. I. A. and Sunday school. For eight years he labored as a home missionary in the Salt Lake Stake, where he also, by appointment of the late Pres. Joseph Young, labored for a number of years among the mass quorums of Seventies as their president. From 1882 to 1891 he acted as clerk of the Thirteenth Ward. When the Bishopric of the 13th Ward was reorganized, after the death of Bishop Millen Atwood, in 1891, Hamilton G. Park was ordained a High Priest by Pres. Joseph F. Smith and set apart as first counselor to Bishop Nelson A. Empey, which position he held for nine years, or until 1900, when he was called to the position of second counselor in the presidency of the High Priests quorum in the Salt Lake Stake of Zion, which office he still holds. Elder Park is one of Zion's most faithful and trustworthy sons; his zeal and integrity in the interest of God's cause has been continuous and unfaltering, and his influence for good has been felt in every locality where he has resided, and on all his missions both at home and abroad. As an employee for many years in Z. C. M. I., he has been and is at the present time entrusted with some of the most responsible duties of a financial nature in that institution. A few years ago he changed his place of residence from the 13th to the 18th Ward.
  12. 12. http://findingaid.lib.byu.edu/viewItem/MSS%201436 Hamilton Gray Park papers Dates: 1869-1910 - Collection contains diaries from 1898 to 1909 concerning activities in Salt Lake City, Utah; a ticket to the School of the Prophets; missionary notes; correspondence; notebooks; business and legal documents; articles of incorporations of the Latter-day Saint Church Salt Lake City 13th Ward; and printed matter. Extent: 3 boxes (1.5 linear ft.) - Creator: Park, Hamilton Gray, 1826-1912 Call Number: MSS 1436 Repository: L. Tom Perry Special Collections; 19th Century Western & Mormon Manuscripts; 1130 Harold B. Lee Library; Brigham Young University; Provo, Utah 84602; http://sc.lib.byu.edu/ Access Restrictions: Open for public research. Find A Grave - Hamilton Gray Park http://www.findagrave.com/cgi- bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Park&GSfn=Hamilton&GSmn=Gray+&GSby=1830&GSbyrel=before&GSdy=1915& GSdyrel=before&GSst=47&GScntry=4&GSob=n&GRid=90671697&df=all& Burial: Salt Lake City Cemetery Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Utah, USA Plot: A_2_6_1E Find A Grave - Agnes Steele Park http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=90672238 Burial: Salt Lake City Cemetery , Salt Lake City , Salt Lake County , Utah, USA Plot: A_2_6_2E Your tombstone stands among the rest neglected and alone. The name and date are chiseled out on polished, marbled stone. It reaches out to all who care. It is too late to mourn. You did not know that I exist. You died and I was born. Yet each of us are cells of you in flesh, in blood, in bone. Our heart contracts and beats a pulse entirely not our own. Dear Ancestor, the place you filled so many years ago. Spreads out among the ones you left who would have loved you so. I wonder as you lived and loved, I wonder if you knew That someday I would find this spot and come to visit you. Author Unknown

×