Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Teaching the Dream: 
The Enduring Idea, Art, and the 
National Civil Rights Museum 
Jody Stokes-Casey 
Education Coordinat...
Enduring Ideas comprise concepts that 
have drawn the attention of humans through 
the ages. 
Marilyn Stewart, Rethinking ...
COURAGE 
VOICE 
JUSTICE
COURAGE 
Enduring Idea: 
Courageous acts can become a part of a larger movement for 
change. 
Essential Questions: 
• Was ...
Defini&ons 
The 
willingness 
to 
act 
with 
or 
without 
fear 
in 
response 
to 
a 
threat 
to 
achieve 
an 
important 
m...
DEFINING COURAGE 
WILLFULNESS 
RISK 
MORALITY 
Courage is no accident. It is a choice. 
Courageous acts involve risks of m...
'There lived … a people who had the moral courage to stand 
up for their rights. And thereby they injected a new meaning 
...
Culture of Resistance Slavery in America 1619-1861
Art, Art History, History, Literacy 
Courage 
Quilt making 
Adaptable to all grades 
Harriet Powers, Bible Quilt, 1885-188...
Memory Jugs 
Art, Art History, History 
Faith 
Ceramics, Collage/Scrapbooking 
Adaptable to all grades 
Kente Cloth 
Art, ...
Frederick Douglass 
Ca. 1840s Ca. 1856 Ca. 1860s 
Ca. 1879 
Photographic Portraits 
Art, Art History, History, Visual Lite...
I, Too, Am American Combating Jim Crow 1896-1954
Aaron Douglas, Aspects of Negro Life: From Slavery to Reconstruction, 1934. Mural 
Painting, Mural Painting 
Art, Art Hist...
A few Harlem Renaissance Artists 
Agusta Savage 
Sculptor 
James Van Der Zee 
Photographer 
Jacob Lawrence 
Painter
Separate is Not Equal Brown v. Board of Education 1954
Malala Yousafzai 
Photo: Veronique de Viguerie/Getty Images
Dr. Kenneth Clark conducting the “Doll Test” with a young male child, 1947. 
Gelatin silver print. Prints and Photographs ...
Mark Rothko, Light Red Over Black, 
1957, Oil on canvas 
Jackson Pollock, Lavender Mist, 1950 
Enamel, oil, acrylic on can...
Standing Up by Sitting Down: Student Sit-ins 1960
Andy Warhol, Birmingham Race Riot, 1964, Screenprint on paper, 16”x 24” 
Printmaking 
Art, Art History, History, Visual Cu...
Gordon Parks, Eldridge Cleaver and His 
Wife, Kathleen, Algiers, Algeria. 1970, 
Gelatin silver print, 13x18” 
Ernest C. W...
Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round: Albany Movement 1961-1963
Neutral 
Courage Meter Activity 
Empty Full 
No Courage Ultimate Courage
Scenario: A group of teenage and younger girls are 
arrested in Albany, Georgia for participating in a non-violent 
protes...
Danny Lyon, The Leesburg Stockade, 1963, Photograph 
Photography 
Art, Art History, History 
Voice, Courage 
All Grades
Photo Jeff Simon The Washington Post, April 30, 2014
Say It Loud: Black Pride, 1966-1975
Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988, Acrylic on Canvas, Tie-dyed, pieced fabric border 74x69: 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, N...
José Clemente Orozco . Frescos at The Cabañas Cultural Institute 
Credit: Adriana Zehbrauskas for The New York Times 
Pain...
Emory Douglas 
(Left) Originally published in The Black Panther April 
18, 1970 (c) 2008 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights 
Soc...
Barbara Jones-Hogu, Unite, 1971, Silkscreen with ink on wove paper, 22 ¼ x 30.” National Civil Rights Museum. 
Graphic Des...
Barbara Jones-Hogu, Relate To Your Heritage, 1971, Silkscreen with ink on wove paper, 34x43.” 
National Civil Rights Museu...
ACTIVITY/ASSIGNMENT SUGGESTION (Learning Links for Say It Loud: Black Pride exhibit) 
Create your own artwork based on the...
Elizabeth Catlett, Negro Es Bello II, 1969, 
Lithograph on paper, 30 x 23 1/3”. National 
Civil Rights Museum. 
Graphic De...
Jet Magazine. November 1966, NCRM 201.003.009
Bayard Rustin and the Courage to Be Authentic
“And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a 
dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in ...
Teaching the Dream: 
The Enduring Idea, Art, and the 
National Civil Rights Museum 
https://www.slideshare.net/JodyStokesC...
Notes and Links 
Slide 10: 
Show Way Purchase: http://www.amazon.com/Show-Way-Jacqueline-Woodson/dp/0399237496 
Show Way L...
Teaching the Dream: The Enduring Idea, Art, and the National Civil Rights Museum
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Teaching the Dream: The Enduring Idea, Art, and the National Civil Rights Museum

This is a presentation I gave at the 2014 Tennessee Art Education Association conference in Memphis, TN. The conference was themed "We Can Dream." The presentation seeks to demonstrate how enduring ideas and essential questions connect classroom concepts to real-world experience to promote higher order thinking. The presentation also shares how my art education training has been essential in shaping the National Civil Rights Museum's educational materials for teachers. Also included are ways to incorporate civil rights history into art lessons.

View the last slide for additional links.

  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Teaching the Dream: The Enduring Idea, Art, and the National Civil Rights Museum

  1. 1. Teaching the Dream: The Enduring Idea, Art, and the National Civil Rights Museum Jody Stokes-Casey Education Coordinator, National Civil Rights Museum Presentation given at the Tennessee Art Education Association State Conference Memphis, TN October 24, 2014
  2. 2. Enduring Ideas comprise concepts that have drawn the attention of humans through the ages. Marilyn Stewart, Rethinking Curriculum in Art (Worcester, Mass: Davis Publications, Inc., 2005), 17.
  3. 3. COURAGE VOICE JUSTICE
  4. 4. COURAGE Enduring Idea: Courageous acts can become a part of a larger movement for change. Essential Questions: • Was courage a necessary component of the Civil Rights Movement? • What happened in the Civil Rights Movement that made people courageous enough to push back and challenge systems and beliefs? • How can learning about the courageous actions of individuals during the Civil Rights Movement influence our own approaches to fears, challenges, or other limitations?
  5. 5. Defini&ons The willingness to act with or without fear in response to a threat to achieve an important moral goal (Woodard and Pury) Types Characteris&cs Examples Non-­‐Examples COURAGE FRAYER MODEL GRAPHIC ORGANIZER Physical Moral Emo&onal/Psychological • Feeling FEAR yet choosing to act • Passion, Conscious, Following your heart • Persevering in the face of adversity • Facing suffering with dignity or faith • Exhibit integrity and character • Standing up for what is right • Indifference/not caring • Bystander • DoubIul, wavering, indecisive Ac&ons and lives of “Big Names” Rosa Parks, Mar&n Luther King, Jr. Thurgood Marshall, Harriet Tubman, etc Small ac&ons can be courageous too. Helping someone in need even if it may be a risk. Doing something by yourself for the first &me. Asking someone on a date
  6. 6. DEFINING COURAGE WILLFULNESS RISK MORALITY Courage is no accident. It is a choice. Courageous acts involve risks of many varieties. Physical, Emotional, Professional, Personal, etc. Oftentimes, the acts considered to be most courageous have a worthy, noble or moral goal.
  7. 7. 'There lived … a people who had the moral courage to stand up for their rights. And thereby they injected a new meaning into the veins of history and civilization.’ Martin Luther King, Jr. 5 December 1955 , Address to the first Montgomery Improvement Association (MIA) Mass Meeting
  8. 8. Culture of Resistance Slavery in America 1619-1861
  9. 9. Art, Art History, History, Literacy Courage Quilt making Adaptable to all grades Harriet Powers, Bible Quilt, 1885-1886, cotton, 75”x89” Smithsonian National Museum of American History Jaqueline Woodson, Show Way, 2005 Harriet Powers (1837-1911), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
  10. 10. Memory Jugs Art, Art History, History Faith Ceramics, Collage/Scrapbooking Adaptable to all grades Kente Cloth Art, Art History, History Voice, Faith Fiber Arts Adaptable to all grades Nkisi Nkondi Art, Art History, History Faith, Justice Sculpture Adaptable to all grades
  11. 11. Frederick Douglass Ca. 1840s Ca. 1856 Ca. 1860s Ca. 1879 Photographic Portraits Art, Art History, History, Visual Literacy, Literacy Voice, Courage, and Justice Photography, Drawing, Criticism Upper levels Contemporary: Have students evaluate their Facebook profile pictures to determine their own visual legacy.
  12. 12. I, Too, Am American Combating Jim Crow 1896-1954
  13. 13. Aaron Douglas, Aspects of Negro Life: From Slavery to Reconstruction, 1934. Mural Painting, Mural Painting Art, Art History, Music, History Voice Painting, Drawing, Value or Color Studies All Grades TN Connection – Nashville, Former teacher at Fisk University, holds extensive collection of his paintings Compare painting to Duke Ellington’s Brown, Black, and Beige
  14. 14. A few Harlem Renaissance Artists Agusta Savage Sculptor James Van Der Zee Photographer Jacob Lawrence Painter
  15. 15. Separate is Not Equal Brown v. Board of Education 1954
  16. 16. Malala Yousafzai Photo: Veronique de Viguerie/Getty Images
  17. 17. Dr. Kenneth Clark conducting the “Doll Test” with a young male child, 1947. Gelatin silver print. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress (62)
  18. 18. Mark Rothko, Light Red Over Black, 1957, Oil on canvas Jackson Pollock, Lavender Mist, 1950 Enamel, oil, acrylic on canvas Painting Art, Art History, History, Philosophy Voice Color Studies Upper Middle – High School Grades
  19. 19. Standing Up by Sitting Down: Student Sit-ins 1960
  20. 20. Andy Warhol, Birmingham Race Riot, 1964, Screenprint on paper, 16”x 24” Printmaking Art, Art History, History, Visual Culture Voice, Courage Upper Grades
  21. 21. Gordon Parks, Eldridge Cleaver and His Wife, Kathleen, Algiers, Algeria. 1970, Gelatin silver print, 13x18” Ernest C. Withers, Young Woman Receives her voter registration card, Fayette County, TN 1960. Gelatin silver print, 15x15” Photography Art, Art History, History, Visual Culture, Philosophy Voice, Courage Middle and Upper Grades
  22. 22. Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round: Albany Movement 1961-1963
  23. 23. Neutral Courage Meter Activity Empty Full No Courage Ultimate Courage
  24. 24. Scenario: A group of teenage and younger girls are arrested in Albany, Georgia for participating in a non-violent protest march. They are jailed in the Leesburg Stockade and held for 45 days with no bedding, extremely unsanitary conditions, and undercooked food. Danny Lyons (member of SNCC) risked his own well-being by sneaking into the stockade and photographing the conditions of the girls. His photographs were entered into the congressional records and used to release the Stolen Girls. Neutral Empty Full No Courage Ultimate Courage
  25. 25. Danny Lyon, The Leesburg Stockade, 1963, Photograph Photography Art, Art History, History Voice, Courage All Grades
  26. 26. Photo Jeff Simon The Washington Post, April 30, 2014
  27. 27. Say It Loud: Black Pride, 1966-1975
  28. 28. Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988, Acrylic on Canvas, Tie-dyed, pieced fabric border 74x69: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Fiber Arts, Painting Art, Art History, History, narrative/story telling Voice All Grades
  29. 29. José Clemente Orozco . Frescos at The Cabañas Cultural Institute Credit: Adriana Zehbrauskas for The New York Times Painting, Mural Painting Art, Art History, History Voice, Justice, Courage Painting, Drawing All Grades
  30. 30. Emory Douglas (Left) Originally published in The Black Panther April 18, 1970 (c) 2008 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York (Below) February 2008, Black Panther: Emory Douglas @ MOCA Pacific Design Center Graphic Design, Printmaking, Painting Art, Art History, History, Visual Culture Voice All Grades
  31. 31. Barbara Jones-Hogu, Unite, 1971, Silkscreen with ink on wove paper, 22 ¼ x 30.” National Civil Rights Museum. Graphic Design, Printmaking, Painting Art, Art History, History, Visual Culture Voice All Grades AfriCOBRA
  32. 32. Barbara Jones-Hogu, Relate To Your Heritage, 1971, Silkscreen with ink on wove paper, 34x43.” National Civil Rights Museum.
  33. 33. ACTIVITY/ASSIGNMENT SUGGESTION (Learning Links for Say It Loud: Black Pride exhibit) Create your own artwork based on the print “Relate to Your Heritage” by AfriCOBRA artist Barbara Jones-Hogu. AfriCOBRA artists sought to celebrate African heritage by using artistic elements found in traditional African art, such as rhythmic patterns and bold colors. In “Relate to Your Heritage” Jones-Hogu uses the rectangular sections to create a rhythmic pattern in the overall composition. She also creates patterns within each rectangular panel by using the letters of the words “relate to your heritage.” Follow the directions below to create artwork in a similar style, using similar technique to Jones-Hogu. • Take a piece of white paper and using a ruler, draw 4 straight lines from the top of the page to the bottom of the page, dividing the page into 5 sections. Make sure each section is wide enough for you to draw a picture inside. • Cut along the lines to create 5 separate strips of paper. • Using a pencil, draw a profile (side view) of yourself in one strip. • Draw a portrait (front view) of yourself in the second strip. • In the third strip draw a picture (you may pick between profile, portrait, or full body) of either your mother, father, aunt, uncle, or someone in your family or community you look up to or feel close to. • In the fourth strip, draw a picture of another relative or older friend or community member (you may pick between profile, portrait, or full body). • In the fifth strip, draw a picture of what you think one of your ancestors may look like (you may pick between profile, portrait, or full body). Think of a great grandmother or grandfather several generations back. You may also choose someone who is a hero to you. • Pick from the following sayings or create your own saying that represents your family or community: Relate to Your Heritage Celebrate Your Family Proud of My Community • In the background of each strip you drew on, write the saying you choose. Use block or bubble letters. You can write the words up and down or sideways. You can repeat words from the saying and have letters disappear off the edges of the page. Use the words of the saying to create a pattern. • Pick 4 bold colored crayons or markers. In addition to the 4 colors, you may also use black and white. Using only these colors, color in each of the 5 strips you drew on. Make sure to color in the background too and each strip can have a different background color. • Move the strips around until you find an order that looks good to you. Once you decide on the order of the strips, glue them down to second piece of paper to create one picture like in the artwork by Jones-Hogu.
  34. 34. Elizabeth Catlett, Negro Es Bello II, 1969, Lithograph on paper, 30 x 23 1/3”. National Civil Rights Museum. Graphic Design, Printmaking, Painting Art, Art History, History, Visual Culture Voice All Grades
  35. 35. Jet Magazine. November 1966, NCRM 201.003.009
  36. 36. Bayard Rustin and the Courage to Be Authentic
  37. 37. “And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal." Martin Luther King, Jr., 1963 March on Washington
  38. 38. Teaching the Dream: The Enduring Idea, Art, and the National Civil Rights Museum https://www.slideshare.net/JodyStokesCasey/ taea-presentation-40512850 Jody Stokes-Casey Education Coordinator, National Civil Rights Museum Presentation given at the Tennessee Art Education Association State Conference Memphis, TN October 24, 2014
  39. 39. Notes and Links Slide 10: Show Way Purchase: http://www.amazon.com/Show-Way-Jacqueline-Woodson/dp/0399237496 Show Way Lesson Plans: http://www.teachingbooks.net/tb.cgi?tid=6143&a=1 Harriet Powers Bible Quilt: http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_556462 Slide 11: Memory Jugs Lesson Plan: http://changing-exhibit.museum.state.il.us/sites/changing-exhibit.museum.state.il.us/files/Memory Jug gallery: http://www.ohiofolk.com/Memory%20Jug%20Gallery.html Kente Cloth Lesson Plan (Elementary) http://www.kinderart.com/multic/kente.shtml AND http://www.dickblick.com/lesson-PBS Lesson Plan for Kente Cloth: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/africa/tools/music/activities3.html Information about Nkisi Nkondi: http://www.artsconnected.org/resource/93730/nail-figure-nkisi-nkondi Slide 12: History on Douglass, photography, and visual culture: http://www.huarchivesnet.howard.edu/0002huarnet/freddoug.htm Visual Literacy: http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/visualliteracy Frederick Douglass as abolitionist : http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p1539.html Also see Courage Guide and http://www.cmbernier.org/ Slide 14: Aspects of Negro Life essay: http://www.jmu.edu/evision/archive/volume4/Burlovich.pdf Duke Ellington “Black, Brown, and Beige” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GM2N8_H4me0 Slide 18: Dark Designs and Visual Culture by Michele Wallace available on Google Books Slide 30: Watch Faith Ringgold Discuss her artwork: http://www.makers.com/faith-ringgold Slide 31: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/17/arts/design/the-legacy-of-the-painter-jose-clemente-orozco-is-revived.Slide 34: Interview with Barbara Jones-Hogu http://never-the-same.org/interviews/barbara-jones-hogu/

×