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Referencing your resources harvard

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Updated 19 February 2013

Referencing your resources harvard

  1. 1. Bibliographies, In-text Referencing and Reference Lists Harvard System Version 2 – 19 February 2013
  2. 2. Bibliographies, In-text Referencing and Reference Lists Acknowledge the origin and give credit for the information and ideas that you use in your assessment.
  3. 3. Why are they important? In addition to acknowledging the work of other people bibliographies and referencing –  Avoids plagiarism  Enable your reader to locate and verify your sources independently  Demonstrate that you have read widely and used quality resources
  4. 4. What needs referencing? Any source of information - books statistics from ABS book chapters encyclopaedia and journal articles dictionaries newspaper articles websites conference papers * even emails and personal government publications correspondence
  5. 5. Bibliographies An alphabetical list of all resources consulted in researching an assignment. Citations include author, date, title, publisher and place of publication.
  6. 6. Annotated Bibliographies An alphabetical list of all resources consulted in researching an assignment. Each entry includes a citation and a description of the resource including information about content, readability, language and relationship to required information.
  7. 7. In-text Referencing Acknowledges ideas and sources of information in the main body of your writing. In-text referencing is an abbreviation of the full citation your reader can find in the reference list. E.g. In his conclusion, Rajaratnam (2001) points to the possible economic and social costs incurred by a nation, when individuals work 'out of phase' with their biological clocks.
  8. 8. Reference List An alphabetical list of all resources used or referred to in writing an assignment. Citations include author, date, title, publisher and place of publication.
  9. 9. Arranging citation information Details about a source of information are arranged in a set order using strict punctuation rules There are a number of world recognized referencing systems  Harvard  APA  Chicago  MLA
  10. 10. What does a reference list look like?
  11. 11. Where does it go? At the end! Only an index would appear after a bibliography or reference list
  12. 12. Take the hard work out of citing and referencing Use the tools on the References tab in Microsoft Word
  13. 13. Referencing a book
  14. 14. Referencing a book Use information found on the title page and verso
  15. 15. Referencing a book Author, initial year, title, edition, Publisher, Place. Our example: O’Connor, I, Wilson, J, Setterlund, D & Hughes, M 2008, Social work and human service practice, 5th edn, Pearson Longman, Frenchs Forest.
  16. 16. Referencing a journal article
  17. 17. Referencing a journal article Author, initial year, ‘Title of article’, Journal title, Volume number, Issue number, page number (s). Our example: Castelino, T 2009, ‘Making children’s safety and wellbeing matter’, Australian social work : the journal of the Australian Association of social workers, 62, 1, (61-73).
  18. 18. Referencing a website http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release-detail/?id=10737420865
  19. 19. Referencing a website Author (person or organisation) Year, (site created or revised) Title of document, Name, (and place if applicable) of sponsor of the site, date of viewing the site, (day month year) <URL> Our example: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011, Young women the dominant users of specialist homelessness services, Australian Government, Canberra, 13 March 2012 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release-detail/?id=10737420865>
  20. 20. Referencing an app https://itunes.apple.com/au/genre/ios/id36?mt=8
  21. 21. Referencing an app Use originator/ author – if not available use the title. Year, (use access year if release date is not available) Title of app. Version number. Mobile app. [Accessed Date]. Our example: Skyscape. 2010. Skyscape Medical Resources. Version 1.9.11. Mobile app. [Accessed 18 January 2011]. Morgan, J. 2012. Business Marketing Lecture. Duke University. itunes-u. Version 1.9.11. Mobile app. [Accessed 25 January 2012].
  22. 22. Our Sample Reference List References: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011, Young women the dominant users of specialist homelessness services, Australian Government, Canberra, 13 March 2012 <http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release-detail/?id=10737420865> Castelino, T 2009, ‘Making children’s safety and wellbeing matter’, Australian social work : the journal of the Australian Association of social workers, 62, 1, (61-73). Morgan, J. 2012. Business Marketing Lecture. Duke University. itunes-u. Version 1.9.11. Mobile app. [Accessed 25 January 2012]. O’Connor, I, Wilson, J, Setterlund, D, Hughes, M 2008, Social work and human service practice, 5th edn, Pearson Longman, Frenchs Forest. Skyscape. 2010. Skyscape Medical Resources. Version 1.9.11. Mobile app. [Accessed 18 January 2011].
  23. 23. Points to remember  Be consistent. Use the same process for each resource  Bournemouth University – easy to follow clear examples of a wide range of sources http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/library/local-assets/how-to/docs/citing-references.pdf  Using Microsoft Word? Remember to select Harvard as your referencing style  Have a question? Please call your library
  • jaypeellanda

    Feb. 17, 2017
  • lyscaj

    Jul. 5, 2016
  • clegg15

    Jun. 19, 2016

Updated 19 February 2013

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