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South Africa.pptx

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South Africa.pptx

  1. 1. SOVEREIGN STATE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA Republic of Angola Republic of Namibia Republic of Zimbabwe United Republic of Tanzania FLAG Coat of Arms Population 57,725,600 25,789,024 2,606,971 16,150,362 55,572,201 Area 1,221,037 km2 1,246,700 km2 825,615 km2 390,757 km2 947,303 km2 Population Density 42.4/km2 20.69/km2 3.2/km2 26/km2 47.5/km2 Capital City Pretoria, Cape Town, Bloemfontein Luanda Windhoek Harare Dodoma
  2. 2. Capital: Pretoria (executive) Bloemfontein (judicial) Cape Town (legislative) Climate: subtropical along east coast; warm, sunny days and cool nights, experiences winter and summer. Religion: 82.0% Christian, 7.1% Indigenous religions, 5.4% Agnostic, 2.4% Hindu, 1.7% Muslim, 0.5% Bahá'í, 0.3% Buddhist and atheist, 0.2% Jewish, and less than 0.1% identified with each other group. Peak season: Summer months are December to March, Autumn is April to May, and Spring is September to November
  3. 3. The Family in South Africa • The basic unit of South African society is the family, which includes the nuclear family and the extended family or tribe. • In traditional African society, the tribe is the most important community as it is the equivalent of a nation. • The coloured and more traditional Afrikaans cultures consider their extended family to be almost as important as their nuclear family, while the English-speaking white community places more emphasis on the nuclear family. The Rural/Urban Dichotomy • There are vast differences between the values of the rural and urban dwellers. • The majority of the whites living in rural areas are Afrikaner farmers who are descended from the Calvinists. Their views on the world are sometimes narrow. At the same time they value human decency over materialism. • The many rural black communities are still rooted in the traditions of their heritage, whereas the increasingly urban black community combines their roots with the urban environment and international influences that surround them.
  4. 4. Meeting Etiquette • When dealing with foreigners, most South Africans shake hands while maintaining eye contact and smiling. • Some women do not shake hands and merely nod their head, so it is best to wait for a woman to extend her hand. • Men may kiss a woman they know well on the cheek in place of a handshake. Greetings are leisurely and include time for social discussion and exchanging pleasantries. Gift Giving Etiquette • In general, South Africans give gifts for birthdays and Christmas. • Two birthdays - 21 and 40 - are often celebrated with a large party in which a lavish gift is given. It is common for several friends to contribute to this gift to help defray the cost. • If you are invited to a South African's home, bring flowers, good quality chocolates, or a bottle of good South African wine to the hostess.
  5. 5. Dining Etiquette • If you are invited to a South African's house: • Arrive on time if invited to dinner. • Contact the hostess ahead of time to see if she would like you to bring a dish. • Wear casual clothes. This may include jeans or pressed shorts. It is a good idea to check with the hosts in advance. Business Meeting Etiquette • Appointments are necessary and should be made as far in advance as possible. • It may be difficult to arrange meetings with senior level managers on short notice, although you may be able to do so with lower-level managers. • It is often difficult to schedule meetings from mid December to mid January or the two weeks surrounding Easter, as these are prime vacation times.
  6. 6. The oldest urban area in South Africa, colloquially named the Mother City. The city is known for its harbor, for its natural setting in the Cape Floristic Region, and for landmarks such as Table Mountain and Cape Point.
  7. 7. Johannesburg, South Africa The Apartheid Museum illustrates the rise and fall of South Africa’s era of segregation and oppression, and is an absolute must-see. It uses a broad variety of media to provide a chilling insight into the architecture and implementation of the apartheid system, as well as inspiring stories of the struggle towards democracy. It’s invaluable in understanding the inequalities and tensions that still exist today.
  8. 8. Capital: Luanda Climate: Like the rest of tropical Africa, Angola experiences distinct, alternating rainy and dry seasons. Religion: 41.0% Roman Catholic, 38.0% Protestant, 12.0% None, 1.0% Animist, 8.0% other Peak season: mid-May to August Off Peak Season: December to
  9. 9. The Angolan People • Although many people when asked may say they are Angolan, most of them will really have their primary sense of identity and loyalty to a tribe. • The major ethnic groups are the Ovimnumdu, the largest, who live predominantly in the central highlands; the Mbundu who cluster around Luanda province; and the Bakongo who live in the northwest provinces. Spirit Worship • Traditional Angolan religions believe in a close connection with the spirit of dead ancestors. They believe that ancestors play a part in the lives of the living. Therefore, the spirits of dead ancestors remain prominent members of the community. • Ancestral worship is a common thread through many indigenous religions. It is considered that not revering the dead can jeopardize the living. It is thought that people must appease the ancestors so that they do not harm the living. It is believed that ancestors can bring famine, plague, disease, personal loss, and other catastrophes.
  10. 10. Meeting People • The most common greeting is the handshake. • Close friends may embrace, kiss, or offer a friendly back-slap. • As in most African countries, greetings should never be rushed. Gift Giving Etiquette • Gift giving is only really practiced in urban areas. • It is not so much a part of Angolan culture and as a result there are not many tips surrounding it. • If you are invited to an Angolan's home, bring fruit, flowers, or chocolates to the host. Dining Etiquette • Angolans are extremely hospitable and enjoy entertaining friends and family in their homes. • In Luanda, they may also entertain in restaurants or cafés since they have adopted more Western ideas about socializing. • The Angolan approach to entertaining retains much of the Portuguese influence, including the time of dinner invitations which are often 8 p.m. • Food is often served from a communal bowl. • Use the serving spoons to scoop food from the communal bowl on to your individual bowl.
  11. 11. is a modern city located in Angola and it overlooks the Altantic Ocean. The charms and uniqueness of the city can never fade away. So when you are in Angola, never forget to visit Luanda.
  12. 12. Benguela is an important tourist destination located in Angola. The Portuguese architecture is the main thing to watch in the city. ‘Benguela’ is a site that must be visited when you are listing a tour to Angola.
  13. 13. Capital: Windhoek Climate: has a sub-tropical climate, desert along the coast and in the south, and arid, with a rainy season from November to March, in the north-central and north-eastern inland areas. Religion: 80%–90% Christians. 75% Protestants, 50% Lutheran. Peak season: from May to August: it's a dry and sunny period, and it's the only one that allows to avoid the intense heat Off Peak Season: summer (December to February)
  14. 14. The Family in Namibia • Namibian culture is quite like any other. The family is recognized as the basic unit of society and it is the head of the household who provides and manages the family’s expenditures and makes all those all- important decisions. Namibian Society • Namibia used to be a patriarchal society, but ever since the women called for equal rights the government had to act for the good of all. Discrimination is still apparent in society. Women do have opportunities; however, it is extremely few to those that are offered to men. Wedding Tradition • In the light of developing relationships and family, it always starts with a great wedding; a union of two individuals. Marriage in Namibia is a social event that leads to marvelous festivities. • The weddings are filled with food and dances that it becomes a grand celebration that incorporates the old and new ways of Namibian culture and tradition.
  15. 15. Meeting Etiquette • First meetings will usually center on personal details (name, country of origin etc.). In turn, you should ask the same sort of questions. It makes a good impression showing a Namibian that one is really highly educated, although such revelations may seem as if one is showing off. • They also do not like to be asked: "What tribe are you?" The best way to put that question today is to ask ’which language is your mother tongue and which region or town do you come from?’ or ’Where did you go to school?’ Business Etiquette • When greeting a Namibian colleague, you may be initially surprised to experience a so-called African handshake. • Women tend to greet other women solely with words, shaking hands only with a woman of higher seniority. • When entering the room for a meeting, it is polite to greet everyone in the room. Even though the other participants may be late, you should try to arrive on time.
  16. 16. The second largest of Namibia’s game reserves after Namib-Naukluft, Etosha National Park surrounds the vast Etosha salt pan. The pan itself is usually dry and only fills with water briefly in the summer, but is enough to stimulate the growth of a blue-green algae which lures thousands of flamingos.
  17. 17. At Fish River Canyon Park, you’ll be able to see one of the largest canyons in the world. There are several fantastic ways to view and experience Fish River Canyon Park in person. If you’re up for a hike, the Fish River Canyon Trail is very popular.
  18. 18. Capital: Harare Climate: There are three main seasons: a rainy season, hot and humid. The kind of climate, with a long dry season, almost always produces a savannah landscape. Religion: 80% Christians. 63% Protestants, 11% Ethnic Religions, 1% Muslims Peak season: mid-May to August, having a cooler weather and almost no rain Off Peak Season: December to February- rainiest period, hot and muggy
  19. 19. The Family in Zimbabwe • The “family” traditionally refers to an expansive kinship network. • There is no such thing as a “cousin” in Zimbabwean culture. Cousins are referred to and understood as one’s brothers and sisters. • Zimbabwean society is generally very patriarchal, men generally hold more decision-making power. Within the family, the oldest male (usually the father) is the patriarch and is expected to be the breadwinner for the entire household. Marriage and Dating • Commonly, Zimbabwean couples date privately and only tell their parents of their relationship once they are ready to get married. • The most common unions among Zimbabweans are unregistered customary marriages. These are customary marriages that are not legally recognized because the man and woman have fulfilled the cultural marriage ceremonies without signing the marriage register.
  20. 20. Greetings • Greet anyone older than than yourself first. Greetings are performed in order of age. If someone doesn’t greet you, it may be because they are older than you and are waiting for you to make the first gesture. • The common greeting is a firm handshake with the right hand. • The traditional greeting involves a clap after the handshake. The first person claps twice whilst saying “Makadii” (‘How are you?’ in Shona). Business Etiquette • Arrive on time. Though your Zimbabwean counterpart may be late, your punctuality is likely to give a good impression. • Greet everyone individually, starting with the person who is standing closest to you and so on. • Offer and receive people’s business cards with your right hand.
  21. 21. For pure adventure consider visiting river Zambezi near Victoria Falls. Here, you’ll definitely have a number of breath-taking fun activities like rafting and triggerfish fishing.
  22. 22. Victoria Falls is a “must sea” tourist attraction in Zimbabwe. Named after the well-known explorer, David Livingstone, the falls attract the bulk of Zimbabwean tourists from different corners of the world.
  23. 23. Capital: Dodoma Climate: The climate is tropical and coastal areas are hot and humid, while the northwestern highlands are cool and temperate. There are two rainy seasons; the short rains generally from October to December, while the long rains last from March to June. Religion: 61.4% Christians, 1.8 % Traditional Religions, 35.2% Muslims, 1.4% unaffiliated with any religion Peak season: June to October- dry season Off Peak Season: March-May
  24. 24. TANZANIA CULTURE • Tanzania is well-known for being a premier safari destination in Africa and attracts travelers from across the globe annually. Alongside the wealth of wildlife and breath-taking landscapes, the country is rich with culture. • Tanzania is home to over 120 different tribes. • Tanzania culture is Swahili, an Arab/African mix, but there are also big Asian communities, particularly Indian, in towns and cities. The Family Unit • the man will be the head of the household and will take all of the major decisions. • The wife will earn respect by having children, and often will not be considered to have reached full womanhood until she has produced a healthy offspring. • Children eat separately, often with their mothers.
  25. 25. Greeting Etiquette • Men greeting Men – A handshake is appropriate in most situations. Handshakes tend to be energetic and very often linger a bit. It is also appropriate for two men to walk hand in hand in public. • Women greeting Women – A handshake and/or bow is appropriate in most situations.If you would like to show great respect you may also place your left hand over your right elbow when handshaking and bowing. • Meetings between Men and Women – Appropriate greetings depend on the nature of the relationship. For all others a handshake and/or bow is appropriate but it is best to wait for the woman to extend her hand, otherwise a bow or a nod of acknowledgment will suffice.
  26. 26. Gift Giving Etiquette • Gifts are nice gestures and are appreciated but are not expected. • A gift does not have to be something that cost a lot of money. Bringing something small from your country such as candy, a calendar, postcards, etc, is appropriate. • Depending on the culture and tribe that you are with, you may find that community members ask you to bring back gifts when you go away, or ask you for gifts upon your arrival. This is actually common for some tribes of Tanzania to ask each other, so do not think that it is only because you are a foreigner. • Often any wrapped gifts will be put aside in public and only opened later in private. Business Etiquette • It’s best to show up on time for a meeting even though you may end up waiting. • Higher ups are usually greeted first, then other men and lastly women. • The person who is hosting the meeting should usually open and close the meeting.
  27. 27. One of the most frequented attractions in Tanzania, Mount Kilimanjaro National Park is home to Africa's highest mountain peak. Unlike other parks in northern Tanzania, this one is not visited for the wildlife but for the chance to stand in awe of this majestic snow-capped mountain and, for many, to climb to the summit.
  28. 28. Serengeti National Park is a vast treeless plain with thousands, even millions of animals searching for fresh grasslands. As the largest national park in Tanzania, the Serengeti attracts thousands of tourists each year.

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