The English In North America By: Josh Kessner History 140 Professor Arguello
Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>Chesapeake Colonies were very persistent in maintaining African slaves as laborers...
Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>Slavery was partly brought about because of the high demand for labor and lack of ...
Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>As difficult as it was for many of the servants to work in the fields, eventually ...
Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>The Chesapeake Colonies had a power system with a distant king at the head of reig...
Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>Initially Puritans had looked at the Indians as hunters and that they had no hope...
Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>The Indians seemed far more experienced and understanding of their environment th...
Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>As the Puritans continued to pour into the native lands, they brought with them d...
Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>Again the productivity of the native Indians was astonishing to the Puritans </li...
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The english in north america

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The english in north america

  1. 1. The English In North America By: Josh Kessner History 140 Professor Arguello
  2. 2. Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>Chesapeake Colonies were very persistent in maintaining African slaves as laborers since there was a decline in the amount of white laborers. </li></ul><ul><li>Planters had purchased many slaves for better productivity on the farm land </li></ul><ul><li>It was understood by the owners of the slaves that fear and punishment was the most powerful way to cause the slaves to work faster with better output </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually it became more of a market of slave owners that participated in the planting business because the families who didn’t own slaves couldn’t keep up with the productivity of multiple cultivators </li></ul>
  3. 3. Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>Slavery was partly brought about because of the high demand for labor and lack of colonists willing to partake in the tobaccos fields </li></ul><ul><li>With the higher demand and poor care of the workers, colonists turned to slave purchasing because they were more capable of working in the harsher conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Slaves were also purchased and sold between the owners, some even sold to pay off gambling debts. </li></ul><ul><li>Slave ownership was seen as more of an investment of property rather than the caring of another worker under their responsibility </li></ul><ul><li>Emigrants were given advantages in coming to the Chesapeake Colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Slaves were further manipulated by the court system and given longer serving time to their masters instead of the court punishing the owner </li></ul>
  4. 4. Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>As difficult as it was for many of the servants to work in the fields, eventually many lived long enough to enjoy some freedom </li></ul><ul><li>Freed slaves often tried to start their own farms </li></ul><ul><li>After defeating the Indians, the Chesapeake colonies maintained more land that was capable of crops simply because it lied close to nearby water supplies. </li></ul><ul><li>With this new fertile land colonists and freed slaves were able to expand further and create greater plantations of tobacco </li></ul><ul><li>The colonial government demanded high taxes to be paid upon these plantations and because of this rebellions broke out amongst the planters </li></ul><ul><li>In 1673, the Dutch came with warships with the intention of burning many of the English tobacco ships </li></ul><ul><li>They were successful in burning a good couple dozen, and added to the economic downfall </li></ul>
  5. 5. Chapter 7 – Chesapeake Colonies <ul><li>The Chesapeake Colonies had a power system with a distant king at the head of reign </li></ul><ul><li>Although there was a distant king, a lot of the decisions were made by the local government which was comprised of mostly the wealthiest of planters </li></ul><ul><li>In the system that the Chesapeake colonies had, wealth was the major identifier of one’s social status </li></ul><ul><li>Below that of local government, were the county courts within each county </li></ul><ul><li>And at the bottom of the legislation, was the family household </li></ul><ul><li>Tobacco harvesting and cultivation was the heart of the way the colonists gained their wealth </li></ul>
  6. 6. Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>Initially Puritans had looked at the Indians as hunters and that they had no hope in agriculture </li></ul><ul><li>Later they discovered that the Indians actually had a superior way of growing crops and cultivating their food </li></ul><ul><li>The Puritans feared that if they were involved with the Indians for a substantial period of time, that they would gain traits and attributes of the natives </li></ul><ul><li>This was looked at in a negative way because the Puritans didn’t see the native Indians as anything to look up to </li></ul><ul><li>The goal of the puritans, as far as working with the Indians, was to convert them to their beliefs and have them follow their way of life. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>The Indians seemed far more experienced and understanding of their environment then the Puritans </li></ul><ul><li>They would use fire to maintain their forests and harvest nuts </li></ul><ul><li>Also, the men would go out and hunt while the Indian women would harvest and plant the crops </li></ul><ul><li>This was far more productive because you know had both man and woman participating in food outcome </li></ul><ul><li>As beneficial as all of this hunting and gathering was though, the downfall was the lack of material possessions </li></ul>
  8. 8. Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>As the Puritans continued to pour into the native lands, they brought with them disease </li></ul><ul><li>The disease definitely had an effect on the native Indians and the power struggle began between native groups </li></ul><ul><li>Another affect of the many Puritans arriving was that their goods were looked at as possessing a spiritual power </li></ul><ul><li>As the population of the colonists began to grow, wars began to break out between the Indians and the Puritan armies </li></ul><ul><li>The Puritans continued to expand their colonies by winning battles between enemy Indians, but they did also help some natives defeat other enemy Indians </li></ul>
  9. 9. Chapter 9 – Puritans and Indians <ul><li>Again the productivity of the native Indians was astonishing to the Puritans </li></ul><ul><li>The Indian men would hunt, fish, create weapons such as bows, spears, nets </li></ul><ul><li>Also they would craft canoes </li></ul><ul><li>Indian women would maintain homes as well as weave baskets and mats </li></ul><ul><li>They also gathered berries, roots, herbs, and stored animals </li></ul><ul><li>The way that the families would work together showed much productivity, yet the puritans saw to it as an exploitation of working women </li></ul><ul><li>The viewpoint of the Indians to the Puritans were that they were mean and selfish destructive people </li></ul>

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